#BlogTour #LoveBooksTours @LoveBooksGroup / #GuestPost : The Devil’s Apprentice – Kenneth B. Andersen @K_B_Andersen

– ‘The Magic of Wor(l)ds’ blog is a hobby, reviews and other bookish stuff on this site are done for free. –

Devils-apprentice.jpg

Today I’m on the ‘The Devil’s Apprentice’ blogtour, organised by Love Books Group Tour.
To promote this book I have a guest post written by its author, but before I let you read it first some ‘basic’ information.

About the Author :

Author PicI WAS BORN IN DENMARK ON A DARK AND STORMY NIGHT IN NOVEMBER 1976 …
… and I began writing when I was a teenager. My first book was a really awful horror novel titled Nidhug’s Slaves. It didn’t get published. Luckily.
During the next 7 years, I wrote nearly 20 novels–all of which were rejected–while working as a school teacher. The rest of the time I spent writing.
In 2000 I published my debut fantasy book, The Battle of Caïssa, and that’s when things really took off. Since then I’ve published more than thirty-five books for children and young adults in genres ranging from fantasy to horror and science fiction.
My books have been translated into more than 15 languages and my series about the superhero Antboy has been adapted for film, which is available on Netflix. An animated tv series is currently in development.
A musical of The Devil’s Apprentice opened in the fall 2018 and the movie rights for the series have also been optioned.
I live in Copenhagen with my wife, two boys, a dog named Milo and spiders in the basement.
About THE GREAT DEVIL WAR: The Great Devil War was published in Denmark from 2005-2016, beginning with The Devil’s Apprentice.
Even though the story (mostly) takes place in Hell and deals with themes like evil, death and free will, it is also a humoristic tale about good and evil seen from a different perspective. A tale that hopefully will make the reader – young or old, boy or girl – laugh and think.
Welcome to the other side!

Author Links:
Kenneth B. Andersen
Twitter
Facebook
Instagram

Synopsis :

Book CoverPhilip is a good boy, a really good boy, who accidentally gets sent to Hell to become the Devil’s heir. The Devil, Lucifer, is dying and desperately in need of a successor, but there’s been a mistake and Philip is the wrong boy. Philip is terrible at being bad, but Lucifer has no other choice than to begin the difficult task of training him in the ways of evil. Philip gets both friends and enemies in this odd, gloomy underworld—but who can he trust, when he discovers an evil-minded plot against the dark throne?

Goodreads

Amazon

The Great Devil War Books 1 – 3

Guest Post :

“Isn’t it boring to be a writer?”

I do a lot of talks in schools, talking to students about my books and about being a writer. It’s a nice way for me to get away from the computer and – being a former school teacher – I really enjoy talking to the students. And – being a writer – I really enjoy being reminded that there are readers out there. They always have a lot of questions and almost every time the above question comes up – usually asked by a boy in the 8th grade. And the question is legit and totally understandable, because what does a writer actually do? You sit and look at a computer screen, containing nothing but letters, all day long. For a kid in the 8th grade it’s very hard to imagine anything more boring than that.
My answer to his question is, that he’s absolutely right. I think it sounds boring, too – the keyword being sounds. Because being a writer is without a doubt the job where you get to travel the most and where you get to see the most amazing places! Just a few examples from my life as a writer: I’ve been to Hell, I’ve seen the future, I’ve had tea with Death and I’ve visited Santa’s workshop.
Because when you’re sitting there writing, you’re not just sitting there writing. You’re with your characters in whatever world you’ve created and that’s as exciting as … well, Hell. Just like reading isn’t about staring at letters, but being sucked into another world and another mind, being presented with ideas you never would have come up with yourself. Ideas that might inspire you and sometimes even change your way of thinking.
I started writing because it’s an easy way of telling stories. Grab a pen and paper or turn on the computer and you’re good to go, ready to travel to other worlds. It really is that easy. The not easy part is writing a good story. That takes time, effort and practice. But as scary as the blank page can be, it can also be very inspiring: Worlds are waiting to be born, and you are the one who can create them. So is being a writer boring? No, it’s like being God. Literally.  The only difference between me and God is that I get paid for my job (okay, that might not be the only difference, but you get the picture 😊)

The Magic of Wor(l)ds

White Zion – Gila Green @green_gila @cervenabarva , A #GuestPost With An #Excerpt

– ‘The Magic of Wor(l)ds’ blog is a hobby, reviews and other bookish stuff on this site are done for free. –

want57927-1XmoeQ1515910732

Today I’m not on a blogtour, but I’m sharing a guest post written by Gila Green, author of ‘White Zion’, to promote this book.
Before I let you read it, I’ll first post some ‘basic’ information.

About the Author :

Gila_GreenCanadian Gila Green is an Israel-based author. Her novels include: No Entry, White Zion, Passport Control, and King of the Class and she’s published dozens of short stories. She writes about racism, war, alienation, immigration, and survival. She has a fascination with the 1930s and 40s in the Middle East, and most recently has turned her attention to African elephant poaching. She does most of her work in a converted bomb shelter overlooking the Judean Hills. She loves to hear from readers. Please visit her

Website
Instagram
Facebook
Twitter
GoodReads
Amazon
YouTube

Synopsis :

WhiteZionMedium
The cover photo is an authentic family photo from Ottoman Palestine around 1920

Gritty Yet Shimmering Stories! I’m not exaggerating here one bit.
It’s titled ‘White Zion’ but Gila Green paints from all the colors/hues of the Jewish palette. These gritty yet shimmering stories get into you. I read them all in two swoops, then stayed up for an hour or two, maybe four, waiting for my heart to return to normal.
– Ruchama King Feuerman, author of In the Courtyard of the Kabbalist and Seven Blessings

In a journey of generations from Aden to Palestine to Ottawa, one Yemenite family encounters new and difficult realities: racism and war, rejection and divorce, resourceful survival and tragic death. With smells of delicious breads wafting up from the page, embroidering detail upon detail in fine literary stitch, Gila Green draws us fully into her narrative, as she generously shares with us the hidden core of family life and the stories she is not afraid to tell.
– Yael Unterman, author of The Hidden of Things: Twelve Stories of Love & Longing

Imagine a group of friends and relatives coming together throughout the afternoon over food and drink, staying late into the evening to share stories that engender laughter, tears, empathy and admiration. The profoundly satisfying stories in White Zion are rich in intimate detail, peopled with a cast of heart wrenching characters at once familiar and unique, a gathering of personalities that leaves me reluctant to leave their company and eager to revisit them.
– Pearl Luke, author of Madame Zee and Burning Ground

BackWhiteZionMedium.jpg

Cervena Barva
Amazon

Guest Post :

Betrayal in White Zion, my historical novel-in-stories

Betrayal between family members often feels like a blow to the stomach with a hockey stick. In this excerpt, a daughter-in-law—who I never name, so for this article let’s call her Sadie—is desperate to keep her mother-in-law from giving her son, Allen, a burial. Sadie is so frantic to achieve her goal that she cremates her husband less than one day after his death from cancer.
There’s no opportunity for Allen’s parents, who live in Canada, to arrive in the USA on time to suspend Sadie’s dubious plans. With no prior knowledge of what is to come the parents are helpless; the betrayal is successful. Sadie single-mindedly fulfills her dead husband’s wishes, or that is what she tells the reader. Allen is dead before the story begins. We have no way of knowing if Sadie’s completing his final desire or peppering betrayal with a generous dose of revenge. Though nothing is explicitly written, it’s obvious there’s no love lost between Sadie and her in-laws. Still, Sadie puts on a pretense of innocently trying to do the right thing.
This is the type of deceit many of us will find familiar. We all do it and when we do, it’s the kind of betrayal we try to justify and in White Zion, this recognizable type of betrayal is served up in larger-than-life doses.
But before White Zion even begins one of its heroes, a young boy named Assaf, would be able to tell you about another kind of betrayal. He’d say it feels more like a descent into a personal hell. Assaf is born in British Mandatory Palestine. He is only twelve in the 1948 War of Independence when his city of birth is attacked from all sides, including the air. The Jewish population of Jerusalem is cut off from supplies when the road from Tel Aviv is blockaded. Young Assaf must boil grass to eat and stand in long lines for a ration of water from a well. He is not yet a teenager but he feels betrayed by humanity itself. He must dodge bombs and bullets on the way to primary school. He must grapple with the violation of an assumed contract that many of us have; we have the right to visit public places without experiencing violence, let alone murder.
And so, my theme of this other, more fatal type of betrayal is off to a running start before the first page of White Zion is written. In other words, that’s the backstory.
A third type of betrayal in White Zion happens on a generational level; to be more precise transgenerational. The central conflict is with the heroine Miriam, often called Miri, and her own DNA. Miri is grown-up Assaf’s Canadian-born daughter.
Today, we are told that epigenetic changes pass from father to daughter, mother to son, preprogramming us for diseases. The research is still ongoing, but either way humans must step up to the plate and realize that long after a war is over, it’s darkest most horrific shadows and bloodiest wounds live on for decades. No one needs to tell this to Miri. She has no need of the latest scientific studies.
The betrayal connections in White Zion are not coincidental. I set out to thread the devastation felt by one Canadian mother, from one of the planet’s coldest capitals, with the grief felt by a boy born on the other side of the world in one of the planet’s most ravaged capitals. I set out to weave betrayal on a macro and a micro level to show its innumerable faces and its inevitable consequences as a warning to all of us. My goal is to make you uneasy, or at least edgy enough, so that readers don’t finish White Zion without taking a backward glance at their own homegrown betrayals.

Excerpt :

“We’re here,” Bubby announced in a trembling voice. “How are you? Can you take us to him or should we go ourselves?”
“No, I can’t do that,” my cousin’s wife slurred, she was clutching an empty bottle in one hand.
“Can you just tell us where?”
“I mean, you’re too late.”
My aunt and uncle looked at one another and then back at their daughter-in-law’s long face, her doll-like lips and reddened eyes.
“I had him cremated immediately. That’s what he would have wanted. His ashes are—”
“Ah!” Bubby shrieked, her hands flying up to protect her ears. “His ashes? Cremated? Our son. Our boy. We’ve come to say goodbye. How could you not let us say goodbye? We came as quickly as we could. We want to say goodbye to Allen. Allen! Why didn’t you wait?”
But my Zaide was already putting his white windbreaker on and tightening his black shoelaces. Then he puts his shaking hand on the doorknob.
“Izzy? Izzy do something. I want to see Allen at least. I’m his mother.”
“Let’s go, Bets, let’s go,” my Zaide said. His voice was just above a whisper. He had already opened the door wide.
“How dare she? How dare she? No asking, no telling, so fast, my God,” my Bubby demanded.
“That’s what he would have wanted,” cousin Allen’s wife repeated firmly, she steadied herself on the sideboard.
“What’s wrong with you?” my Bubby asked. “We’re his parents.”

The Magic of Wor(l)ds

 

#BlogTour #DamppebblesBlogTours @damppebbles @DamppebblesBTs / #GuestPost : A Proclivity to Prurience (The Obsession Trilogy #1) #AProclivitytoPrurience – Cheryl Butler @cherylbuts

– ‘The Magic of Wor(l)ds’ blog is a hobby, reviews and other bookish stuff on this site are done for free. –

A Proclivity to Prurience banner.png

Today I’m on the ‘A Proclivity to Prurience’ blogtour, organised by Damppebbles Blog Tour.
To promote this book I have a guest post, but before I let you read it first some ‘basic’ information.

About the Author :

IMG_7229Having worked in a variety of industries, Cheryl has met many interesting people and, with a profound interest in what makes them tick, she has spent a lifetime of asking ‘What would I do in that situation?’ and ‘What if things happened this way?’, creating a multitude of plots and twists that she had always dismissed until one storyline nagged her constantly and she decided to alleviate herself of the burden, committing her ideas to virtual paper. Assuming she would run out of steam five chapters or so in, she amazed herself by writing two novels within a year and A Proclivity To Prurience was born. It was difficult to write, given the themes, but Cheryl felt it was a story that would resonate in the current climate. Writing between a part-time job and raising two young children was a task in itself, but, every spare minute was spent doing so or thinking about doing so and her characters took on a life of their own.
Cheryl loves character-driven tales with a psychological edge and aims to produce that kind of work herself, and she’s not afraid to tackle issues that some may find difficult… other than horror – she can’t read or write horror as she scares far too easily!
Aside from writing and her family, Cheryl’s greatest passion is music and she can easily lose herself in a favourite album or song, rather like she does within a book she’s writing or reading, and a musician’s ability to move you on any level is pure genius.

Social Media:
Twitter
Facebook
Website
Instagram

Synopsis :

Front Cover - CopyJoe’s controversial approach to life is fuelled by his fixation on Abbie, and a beautiful wedding offers the perfect opportunity for him to seduce her – everyone loves a wedding, don’t they? The only hurdle is Eddie – Abbie’s son and Joe’s best friend – but inebriated and forcing an end to the evening, he inadvertently assists Joe’s quest and a suitably indulgent night beckons. But what should have been a culmination of Joe’s eleven-year obsession descends into chaos and devastation, wrenching Joe from all he’s known for the majority of his life. Accustomed to getting what he wants, it’s not until he really gets what he wants that his world unravels and his control slips away. Be careful what you wish for, be careful who you wish for, for obsession comes with a price… but is it a price worth paying?
Explicit – strictly 18+

Purchase Links:
Amazon UK
Amazon US

Publishing Information:
Published in ebook and paperback formats on 24th May 2019 by Little Bee Publishing.

Guest Post :

Hurdles I’ve Faced

When I decided to write A Proclivity To Prurience (the first in the Obsession Trilogy), all I had was an idea about a relationship between a young man – Joe, 23 – and an older woman – Abbie, 40/41. I figured, quite quickly, that Joe’s interest would not be in Abbie’s art collection (Abbie doesn’t have an art collection, but you get my point), so I knew I would have to include some sex scenes, and because Joe was a troubled man with a difficult history, I felt those scenes would need to reflect his attitude, and that meant they would be coarse and explicit. I balanced that with the use of lengthy, poetic sentences and paragraphs, but despite that, when A Proclivity To Prurience was first published, it was classed as Erotica. I disagreed because I saw the sex scenes as a contrivance to better understand the characters, not as the whole story, and the language as a mirror to those same characters, but I was overruled. That said, I have no issue with Erotica, but many people do, and it made it very difficult to get my book noticed. Whilst historically, a lot of Erotica has been badly written, things have changed, but still people are scared by the notion of books containing sex… why, then, was the Fifty Shades series so hugely popular? Was it the romance that lured women to read the books? Maybe, but I didn’t hear anybody complain about the sex scenes; in fact, when the films were released there were complaints that there wasn’t enough sex, given the content of the novels, and yet sex continues to be a contentious subject; a very natural and necessary part of life has been tainted by… what? No matter what Christian Grey did for womankind, many novels still skirt around the subject – films don’t, nor do television programmes, so why do books? Is it merely the language? Visuals don’t need to use those tricky words that describe those tricky acts – is that what authors are afraid of? Is that what readers are afraid of? Is that why my writing has been called ‘filth’, ‘smutty’ and ‘porn’? It’s OK, my therapist has given me a fabric doll and some pins… I’ve been called various names for daring to write about sex, and my novel has been dismissed by reviewers and bloggers because of its content, yet when readers have contacted me, it has never been about the sex scenes, but rather about the twists in the story that have, thankfully, moved or shocked them; these open-minded individuals are rare, and I love them dearly. The other oddity – one I could never have anticipated – is that many people ask me, once they learn the premise, if my book is about me and my life; my responses have ranged from, ‘What the…?’, to, ‘Yes, but my husband doesn’t know so please keep it to yourself’. But had I written about mass murder or a plot to bring down the government, would I be asked the same question? I think not.
Whilst sex may be fitting for the relationship between my two main characters, the relationship itself is rather non-conformist; we’re familiar with the image of a mature male with a younger partner, but not so much with the opposite, and being a fan of the unconventional, I wanted Joe to be the instigator of that association, though with much provocation. Nothing about Joe is conventional, nor Abbie, and I’d go so far as to say the same applied for the entire story, and that has its own issues as many readers long for a traditional love story, a happily-ever-after. Is A Proclivity To Prurience a love story? Well, that is most certainly up for debate, but, like Joe, it doesn’t fit neatly into a box; it crosses many genres, and that causes consternation too, but I wanted to create discussion; I wanted readers to see a different perspective and deliberate the characters and their deeds, but despite the inclusivity we strive for in society, the huge progress we’ve made, yet again I find a need for the ‘norm’ precludes readers from diversifying slightly. Add sex into the mix and suddenly my book becomes scarier than a horror novel!
So, what hurdles have I faced? Sex (did I make that clear?) – and people’s aversion to the subject matter – and the conventional. I don’t understand either, but should someone wish to enlighten me, I’m all ears. The world would be far happier if we just relaxed a little and saw sex in a more positive light and welcomed everything that defied convention, and so would this author: discuss…

The Magic of Wor(l)ds

dpbt 2

#BlogTour #RachelsRandomResources @rararesources / #GuestPost : A Christmas Kiss (Life on the Moors Book 4) – Eliza J. Scott @ElizaJScott1

– ‘The Magic Of Wor(l)ds’ blog is a hobby, reviews and other bookish stuff on this site are done for free. –

A Christmas Kiss.png

Today I’m on the ‘A Christmas Kiss’ blogtour, organised by Rachel’s Random Resources.
To promote this book I have a guest post written by the author, but before I let you read it first some ‘basic’ information.

About the Author :

The Talisman - Avatar - Eliza J ScottEliza lives in a 17th-century cottage on the edge of a village in the North Yorkshire Moors with her husband, their two daughters and two mischievous black Labradors. When she’s not writing, she can usually be found with her nose in a book/glued to her Kindle or working in her garden. Eliza also enjoys bracing walks in the countryside, rounded off by a visit to a teashop where she can indulge in another two of her favourite things: tea and cake.
Eliza is inspired by her beautiful surroundings and loves to write heart-warming stories with happy endings.

Social Media Links :
Blog
Twitter
Instagram
Facebook
Goodreads
Bookbub
Amazon Author Page UK
Amazon Author Page US

Synopsis :

A CHRISTMAS KISSA sparkling festive romance that will warm your heart this Christmas.
The week before Christmas, GP Zander Gillespie finds his festive plans in tatters. He’s supposed to be flying out to his parents’ chateau in Carcassonne with his high-maintenance girlfriend, Melissa. But she has other ideas. She wants to spend Christmas in London with her party friends – and he’s not invited. The prospect of facing his family, with their questions and their sympathy – not to mention the ‘I told you so-s’ – just isn’t an option. Instead, Zander decides to head to his holiday cottage in the quaint moorland village of Lytell Stangdale, where he intends to hide away with his faithful rescue Labrador Alf.
Eighty miles away, Livvie’s world has come crashing down. With plans to cook a romantic meal for her boyfriend, she heads home early and walks in on him in a compromising position with their neighbour. Fed-up of his lies and philandering ways, this is the final straw. With her Christmas plans up in smoke, the thought of spending it with her parents and her smug, married sister with her pompous husband in tow, is enough to bring Livvie out in hives. So, when she fires up her laptop and finds the perfect little holiday cottage in Lytell Stangdale available to rent over the festive period, it seems the perfect solution. Or is it…?
Zander didn’t believe in love at first sight until he set eyes on Livvie. Livvie had sworn off men until she met Zander. The pair may be reluctant to give in to temptation, but fate seems to have other ideas…
Join Livvie and Zander – and all the usual characters – for a magical Christmas in Lytell Stangdale.
The perfect cosy read to snuggle up with this Christmas.

Purchase Links:
Amazon UK
Amazon US

Guest Post :

Hi Stefanie, thank you for taking part in the Publication Day Blog Tour of A Christmas Kiss and for allowing me to do a guest post for your wonderful blog. As book 4 in the Life on the Moors series is a Christmas novel, I thought it would only be right if my post had a festive feel, so I thought I’d share what happens on Christmas day at the Scott household.

Having two daughters has meant that Christmas morning usually starts rather early for us, and things don’t seem to have changed as they’ve got older. In fact, I think it’s actually got even earlier! With barely having chance to rub sleep from our eyes, we head downstairs using the sparkly ‘Santa Lamp’ to light the way we’ve used this since our eldest daughter (who’s now twenty-six) was six months old. Even though they haven’t believed in Father Christmas for a very long time, the girls check for Santa’s footprints and Rudolph’s hoofprints (these are something I prepare before going to bed the previous evening, using an ancient home-made template and a liberal sprinkling of talcum powder and glitter). Now they’re older, they find this hilarious, but it’s a Scott family tradition that I’m not prepared to give up on. Then the girls check to see if the tray of goodies they prepared for Santa and Rudolph the night before has been touched. I’m not quite sure how Santa’s treats have come to include a pork pie, cheese and biscuits and a glass of port (Santa), and a glass of milk and a carrot (Rudolph) – though I think it may have something to do with Mr S, who devours everything but the milk and carrot which he kindly leaves for me. He’s all heart! After giggling some more, the girls then launch into an exciting frenzy of present opening, while Mr S makes us a much-needed pot of tea (he has to redeem himself for leaving ‘Mrs Claus’ to dispose of a measly carrot and glass of room-temperature milk!). Once the first mug of tea has been downed, I begin to feel a little more human and a little less bleary eyed – even more so when I’ve consumed the bacon sandwiches made by Mr S; they seem to taste even better on Christmas morning.
With wrapping paper stuffed well out of the way in the recycling bin, we get dressed and head out on our traditional Christmas Day walk. If we’re lucky, it’ll be a beautiful, crisp morning with a bright blue sky up above and we’ll have a bracing walk over the moors for about an hour, before returning in plenty of time for us to get the Christmas dinner underway. This is my favourite meal of the whole year and I cook it while listening to a playlist of festive tunes – Michael Bublé being a favourite. I like to have a good old croon along as I’m cooking but as I’m tone deaf, this isn’t something my family seem overly keen to encourage. Oh, well…
As our extended family is spread around all over the place, we tend to celebrate the big day with just the four of us and make telephone calls to everyone else later in the morning. We catch up with one-another on the run-up to New Year; it keeps everyone happy that way.
One of my favourite things is the table we have set for Christmas dinner. The theme for the last few years has been white, silver and green and includes a large centre-piece, table-confetti snowflakes, mini Christmas crackers and lots of candles in silver candle holders dotted about. When the lights are dimmed it looks very atmospheric.
I don’t watch much television, but Christmas day TV always includes Top of the Pops and the Queen’s speech; they’re a must at Scott HQ. Then, once the dinner has been devoured and the dishes washed and put away, the afternoon will usually find Mr S dozing on the sofa to a block-buster film, the girls looking over their presents or communicating with their friends, while I’ll be curled up very happily with a book or my Kindle. Bliss!
After having such a large meal, we can only manage a light supper, then I’ll go back to my reading until I feel my eyes getting heavy and my bed calling me. We won’t have done a lot, but it’s a day when we can all just relax and forget about everything that’s going on and I look forward to it more each year.
The Scott family Christmas may be filled with the same traditions , but for Zander and Livvie in A Christmas Kiss, theirs is full of surprises! I hope you enjoyed getting to know them.

Many thanks for joining another Publication Day Blog Tour in the Life on the Moors series, Stefanie, and for inviting me onto your blog; it’s been great to catch up with you again.
Eliza xxx

The Magic of Wor(l)ds

 

#BlogTour #LoveBooksTours @LoveBooksGroup / #GuestPost : Stand Against Injustice – Michelle Diskin @Michelle_Diskin @malcolmdown

– ‘The Magic of Wor(l)ds’ blog is a hobby, reviews and other bookish stuff on this site are done for free. –

Stand Against Injustice

Today I’m on the ‘Stand Against Injustice’ blogtour, organised by Love Books Group Tour.
To promote this book I have a guest post written by its author, but before I let you read it first some ‘basic’ information.

About the Author :

Author pic MichelleBates-006 (1)Mother of three, campaigner for justice and Committed Christian.
Michelle campaigned for eight years for the release of her disabled brother, Barry George, after he was wrongly convicted in 2001, for the high profile murder of BBC television presenter, Jill Dando. Mr George was acquitted in 2007 and sent for re-trial in 2008. He was found not guilty, by unanimous jury verdict on 1st August 2008.
Born in Fulham, London in 1955, Michelle lived in West London until 1973. She then moved to Cork, Ireland, where she lived until 2012, with her three adult children. Michelle’s first husband, Patrick, died unexpectedly in 2007 after a short illness, but, with God’s grace, she is now married again, to Peter, who supports her in her Miscarriage of Justice (MOJ) activities. They are both committed Christians, who worship at a Baptist church in Northamptonshire, taking on many responsibilities within the fellowship.
Retired now, Michelle always worked outside of the home in various industries, and at all levels from cleaner to management. Her ethos being: do the job to the best of your abilities, as a service to others, regardless of the task. She has trained as an Image Consultant and most recently, as a weight loss consultant.
Since her brother’s wrongful incarceration, she has become a public speaker at Miscarriage of Justice conferences across the UK, and has also been a guest speaker at the Spiritual Health Weekends for women, run by Nancy Goudie. Also a guest lecturer at University College Cork and Portsmouth University to Law students interested in Miscarriage of Justice. Also attending APPGs on miscarriage of justice in Parliament.
Michelle is still in touch with many families of the wrongly convicted, including those convicted under Joint Enterprise. She also has connections with various MOJ organisations, e.g. Mojo Scotland, The Innocence Project in UK Universities, and a variety of legal representatives and released victims of MOJ.
She is interested in the refusal of the Judiciary to pay compensation under section 133., ‘Not innocent enough’ or ‘A jury, properly directed, could have convicted’, both of which still affect her brother.

Synopsis :

9781910786246 (1)On April 26, 1999, BBC TV presenter Jill Dando was murdered outside her home in London. Barry George was convicted and imprisoned for the murder but was later acquitted after an appeal and retrial. Stand Against Injustice is the powerful memoir of the sister of Barry George. For the first time, Michelle Diskin Bates tells her story, the human side and truth behind one of recent history’s most high profile and damaging miscarriages of justice whose life is inextricably interwoven in the drama, the trauma, the conspiracy and the fight for justice. A self-confessed ‘ordinary housewife’, Michelle’s voice weaves the personal everyday struggles that bring depth, color, and passion into what is an extraordinary account. A troubled childhood weighted with overbearing responsibility, fear and insecurity, depression, and the challenges of marriage and adult relationships, Michelle’s life has never been easy. However, the one constant in her life – her faith in God – underpins and provides the foundation upon which she now stands – against injustice.

Amazon

Guest Post :

No Reverse Gear

Truly, I believed the story I told myself. The anecdote, that as soon as my book was written, as soon as the public had access to the truth, I would hang up my virtual pen forever, relax into retirement and the relative comfort of anonymity again.
I’ve always been a reluctant speaker. Media interviews, being on stage, or a guest speaker was something dragged from me by necessity. I would do the job God had set me, write my book Stand Against Injustice, then I would walk off into the sunset with my lovely husband, Peter, and relative obscurity. I’d imagined us enjoying Orient Express inspired train journeys across continents. Or the breeze as we promenaded on the decks of a cruise boat.
Then the book was published, and my dreams of freedom and obscurity were shattered. Life is now a round of public speaking events – at miscarriage of justice conferences, writing clubs, community groups and legal students. Then there are trips to London to attend Parliament for All Party Parliamentary Groups, focusing on aspects of the justice system. I am still writing articles for magazines and being interviewed for TV and radio shows. Then there are more visits to Ireland to do the same.
The lure of looking forward to going back, of taking control of my life again was so strong. I could be me again, the person I was before all of this madness entered my life. But would I really want that? I’ve been changed forever…no going back. My life is so full. I’m meeting such amazing people, working with fractured but strong, determined families, would I really want to give that up?
No, when you invite God into the driving seat of your life, you’d best understand…there is no reverse gear!

The Magic of Wor(l)ds

#BlogTour #RachelsRandomResources @rararesources / #GuestPost : To Snare A Witch – Jay Raven @JayRavenAuthor

– ‘The Magic Of Wor(l)ds’ blog is a hobby, reviews and other bookish stuff on this site are done for free. –

EEKtr5qg

Today I’m on the ‘To Snare A Witch’ blogtour, organised by Rachel’s Random Resources.
To promote this book I have a guest post written by the author, but before I let you read it first some ‘basic’ information.

About the Author :

GyYx5AuwJay Raven is the author of Gothic chillers and historical horror reminding readers that the past is a dangerous place to venture, full of monsters and murderous men. He blames his fascination with vampires, witches and werewolves on the Hammer Horror films he watched as a teenager, but living in a creepy old house on the edge of a 500-acre wood may have something to do with it.
If you would like to be informed of new releases, enjoy free short stories and access exclusive giveways and competitions, please subscribe to Jay’s monthly newsletter on his website.

Social Media Links :
Facebook
Twitter

Synopsis :

RDQqDCRAA Chilling historical tale of lust, sorcery and devastating revenge

No female dares spurn the lecherous advances of Sir Henry Cruttendon, 17th Century England’s most reviled nobleman. To do so risks a retribution that would terrify the Devil himself.
But Elizabeth Fiennes is no ordinary woman, blessed with stunning beauty, intelligence and guile. Coming from an influential family, she believes she is safe.
What she doesn’t understand is that the Earl is determined to satisfy his lust and plans to use the wave of witch trials, fear and superstition sweeping the countryside to force her into his clutches.
And as he springs his malicious trap it triggers a chain of unholy events plunging hunter and prey into a maelstrom of deceit, terror and depravity – leaving them both staring into the face of true evil…

Purchase Links:
Amazon UK
Amazon US

Guest Post :

Gothic horror writer Jay Raven reveals why he won’t be burning witches at the stake any time soon.

It’s a given in any film on witchcraft and witch trials. Before the closing title some poor screaming innocent is going to be strapped to a pole atop a bonfire, vicious dancing orange flames licking around their writhing body as smoke swirled and piles of faggots crackle and flare at their feet.
We’ve all come to expect that blazing scene – packed full of dread, danger and shock,  guaranteed to chill us with horror and make us all glad that we live in modern times when such atrocities no longer take place.
And when I began to sketch out my 17th century sorcery series To Snare A witch I fully intended to have a scene like that in the very first book – to give everything a sense of period and a suitably sinister tone.
But it didn’t take long for me to realise that my necromancy drama series, set in England in the 1600s, was going to be wildly inaccurate if I did that – because my research showed that witches weren’t burnt in England but were actually hanged.
Unlike Europe and Scotland where practising witchcraft was a religious crime (an offence against God), in England and America it was classified as a civil offence, a crime against the community. That meant it was technically a felony, and the punishment for felonies was the gallows.
Obviously I was surprised – I’d been brainwashed by years of Hammer Horror films and other Hollywood chillers – to automatically assume that firelighters and kindling were a necessary prerequisite for any witch killing.
And I was annoyed too. Incorporating nooses and hangmen was going to mean a major rethink but eventually I accepted it. And I hope that in Bell, Book andCandle – part one of the spellbinding series, I’ve come up with an alternative scene just as frightening and grizzly. It’ll be up to readers to let me know.
Finding out about this misnomer in the way we view history made me wonder how many of the other things we thought we knew about witchcraft trials were actually wrong. And it turns out, there’s quite a few.
For one thing, very few witches were actually burnt alive – even in Europe where there were estimated to be some 40,000 executions. Yes, most of the condemned were incinerated on huge pyres, but the practise was to snap the neck of anyone found guilty before their corpse were immolated. So the plaintiff cries for mercy from amongst the flames was all film-maker’s stretching the truth.
Indeed, our picture of witches being exclusively old women – the stereotypical wart-nosed old crone – was off beam too. Many men were tried and executed under Witchcraft Laws, and of the females put to death a fair many were young girls, accused by love rivals.
But perhaps the most intriguing myth is that the execution of witches increased dramatically in England under the reign of James the 1st. He was notoriously obsessed with the subject of necromancy and believed he was under constant threat from dark, demonic forces. He even wrote a book on the subject, entitled Daemonologie.
But although he revised and strengthened the existing witchcraft laws in 1604 making any kind of magic or invocation punishable by death, the updating contained a clause that actually hindered witch-finders and magistrates in their task of exposing those in league with the devil. Up until then the torture of suspects was commonplace and most were convicted upon their own confessions – made in agony, dismemberment and despair.
But the act banned torture and unsurprisingly the numbers of accused confessing plummeted. Securing a conviction became much harder and for the last nine years of James 1st’s reign, only five souls were hanged for witchcraft.

The Magic Of Wor(l)ds

#BlogTour #RachelsRandomResources @rararesources / #GuestPost : Weave Of Love (Choices and Consequences #3) – Rachel J Bonner @RachelJBonner1

– ‘The Magic Of Wor(l)ds’ blog is a hobby, reviews and other bookish stuff on this site are done for free. –

IobaNETg.png

Today I’m on the ‘Weave Of Love (Choices and Consequences #3)’ blogtour, organised by Rachel’s Random Resources.
To promote this book I have a guest post written by its author, Rachel J Bonner, but before I let you read it first some ‘basic’ information.

About the Author :

index

Rachel J Bonner is the author of the four book Choices and Consequences series, the first of which, Strand of Faith, is due out in November 2018.
Getting a degree in engineering, followed by a career in accountancy is probably not a conventional path to becoming an author, particularly in paranormal romance. Rachel says that, although accountancy isn’t anything like as boring as everyone thinks, writing is a lot more fun. When not writing, she can be found walking in the beautiful countryside near where she lives, which has influenced much of the scenery in her books, or shooting things with her local archery club. Target shooting only, honest. Nothing to worry about.
She also enjoys swimming, eating chocolate chip cookies and growing aromatic herbs, especially thyme and rosemary. It’s no coincidence that her heroine likes the same things.

Twitter
Facebook
Website
Newsletter subscription link
Amazon Author Page
Goodreads

Synopsis :

9R5u38gwWhat if the choice you have to make has devastating consequences for others?
How can anyone know the right thing to do?

Leonie chose to sacrifice everything to save other people. Now those around her have to face the consequences – and those consequences are not what they expected.
Prospero must deal with his own guilt. He was the one who gave Leonie the tools she needed – her life was in his hands. To make the most of what she did, he will have to face up to all the family issues he has avoided for so long. Whatever he chooses to do, someone he loves will be hurt. For Leonie’s sake, is he now strong enough to make the choice he couldn’t make before?
The crisis predicted by Lord Gabriel has come and gone. But his task isn’t over. Leonie’s very existence may be out in the open but Gabriel discovers that the past is never what it seems – and nor is the present. How can he use what he now knows to bring together those who have been enemies for as long as anyone can remember? If he fails in this, everything he’s had to do so far will be in vain.

Amazon
Google Play
Other Retailers

Guest Post :

Friendship

My best girl friend and I met when we were three and we’re still friends more years later than either of us would like to count. At times we’ve worked together and been in touch every couple of days. Now we live hundreds of miles apart and there may be times where we don’t speak for months – but we can always pick things up exactly where we left off. If it wasn’t for her encouragement, my books wouldn’t be published – that’s why Weave of Love is dedicated to her.
If you read the dedications for the previous book in the series, Thread of Hope, you may have noticed that it was also in memory of my friend Ronnie. I’d only known him for a few years and we didn’t appear to have much in common. We were of different generations, different backgrounds, gender, education, experiences. All we really had were some shared tasks at church and a love of cricket (which we rarely talked about). And yet, we were friends. We could sit down together and chat; it didn’t have to be about anything in particular but we never ran out of conversation. And we helped each other with various tasks.
My husband was my friend before we started dating. Now he’s my best friend despite being married for more than thirty years.
Friendship is definitely a form of love, and the Choices and Consequences series is about friendship as much as about romantic love. One of the early reviews about Strand of Faith (Book 1 in the series) said:
“As for Prospero and Leonie, I really hoped that they could be friends and so much more. I just wanted things to work out for the two of them. Not necessarily as romantic partners but even just friends. Both clearly needed that.” J Bronder Book Reviews
I hope that, as I’ve carried on writing the series, I’ve shown that Prospero and Leonie become friends as much as lovers. And, as he meets them again, Prospero starts to repair his friendships with some of his past lovers too, showing the importance of dealing with issues which can drive people apart. If you’ve read Thread of Hope, you’ll have met one of his past lovers, Lesley. In Weave of Love you meet more, including both Melanie and Clare, so you can judge for yourself.
You’ll also meet Prospero’s brothers and cousins. Again, you’ll be able to judge for yourself but the way they pick up their relationships after a long separation suggests to me that they are friends as well as relatives. As someone says in Cloth of Grace (Book 4 so this is a sneak peek):
“All of them, all six brothers, they’re fiercely loyal to each other. They’d take on the world – or give it up – for each other, no matter if just a moment before they were at each other’s throats. And no matter if they haven’t seen each other for a decade, either.”
But no discussion of friendship and the Choices and Consequences series would be complete without mentioning Andrew. Andrew has strong feelings for Prospero, which everyone but Prospero knows. He’s learnt to manage them. As he explains to Leonie in Strand of Faith “We’re friends, we care about and support each other. It doesn’t need to be more.”
Slowly, Andrew also becomes friends with Leonie. Here’s the moment in Thread of Hope when he realises that (Perry is a nickname for Prospero):
He’d be there for her from now on if she needed him and he’d do his best to make sure Perry looked after her properly. Then he had something of an epiphany; this girl was getting what he’d thought for many years that he wanted – namely Perry – and not only was he not jealous of her, he was also thinking of her needs ahead of Perry’s.
I hope you enjoy reading this story of love and friendship in Weave of Love and in the previous books, and that you continue with me to the end of the series.

Giveaway :

Win signed copies of Strand of Faith, Thread of Hope and Weave of Love, plus a selection of bookmarks, plus three MixPix acrylic photo tiles (Open INT)
*Terms and Conditions – Worldwide entries welcome. Please enter using the Rafflecopter box below. The winner will be selected at random via Rafflecopter from all valid entries and will be notified by Twitter and/or email. If no response is received within 7 days then Rachel’s Random Resources reserves the right to select an alternative winner. Open to all entrants aged 18 or over. Any personal data given as part of the competition entry is used for this purpose only and will not be shared with third parties, with the exception of the winners’ information. This will passed to the giveaway organiser and used only for fulfilment of the prize, after which time Rachel’s Random Resources will delete the data. I am not responsible for despatch or delivery of the prize.

Rafflecopter giveaway

Er1YXaEQ

The Magic Of Wor(l)ds