#BlogTour #BeastHeartBlogTour #MeerkatPress @MeerkatPress / #GuestPost : Beast Heart #BeastHeart – Kyle Richardson @KyleWritesBooks

– ‘The Magic of Wor(l)ds’ blog is a hobby, reviews and other bookish stuff on this site are done for free. –

BEASTHEART - BlogTour Banner

Today I’m on the ‘Beast Heart’ blogtour, organised by Meerkat Press.
To promote this book I have a guest post, but before I let you read it first some ‘basic’ information.

About the Author :

BEASTHEART - Kyle Richardson - Author PhotoKyle Richardson lives in the suburban wilds of Canada with his adorable wife, their rambunctious son, and their adventurous daughter. He writes about shapeshifters, superheroes, and the occasional clockwork beast, moonlights as an editor at Meerkat Press, and has a terrible habit of saying the wrong thing at the most inopportune moments. His short fiction has appeared in places such as Love Hurts: A Speculative Fiction Anthology and Daily Science Fiction.

Website | Twitter

Synopsis :

Title: Beast Heart by Kyle Richardson
Release Date: 3/31/20
Genre: YA / Paranormal / Steampunk

BEASTHEART - COVERWhen the girl with the clockwork hand meets the boy with the beast heart, sparks fly in this poignant, adventure-filled debut.
Book 1 of the Steambound Trilogy.
When Gabby’s hand turns to steam, her mom hires an engineer to build her a clockwork glove. It’s the last thing Gabby wants—if only she could be normal. But when her mom is attacked by something monstrous, normal is no longer an option. Now the only person she can turn to is a grizzled detective, who promises to help her become something … more.
Meanwhile, Kemple’s foster dad treats him like a slave. And the beatings are getting worse. So when a rebellious girl named Josephyn arrives—with a plan to escape to the city—he doesn’t hesitate. But there are creatures in Iron Bay whose slashes are worse than skin-deep. And as Kemple evolves into something inhuman, his search for a cure begins.
They are strangers in a city where carriages rattle, airships rumble, and where their own dark pasts continue to haunt them. Soon their paths will collide, and the girl who slays monsters will come face to face with the boy who is becoming a beast.

Meerkat Press | Amazon | Barnes & Noble

Guest Post :

What’s the biggest challenge of writing from the viewpoints of two different characters?

I’d say the biggest challenge of a dual-POV narrative is a matter of harmony. How do these perspectives compliment each other? How do they challenge each other? How do their edges fit, when nestled side by side?
The easiest writing path is, of course, to simply not worry about such things. To tell the characters’ stories naturally, and to let the chips fall where they may. But a lot of readers expect more than that. They want cohesion. Meaning. Purpose. They might not be consciously aware of these things while reading, but the desire for some sort of purposeful story architecture is still there. Without it, readers are likely to complain that the tale felt “confusing”, “aimless”, or, worst of all: “boring”!
There’s a risk, however, of a writer trying too hard to make a story line up in a meaningful way. If the structure is too obvious, then readers are likely to complain that things felt “forced”, “unnatural”, or “preachy”.
So what’s a writer to do?
For me, the key is to focus on something simple: something small and distinct to keep in mind when dealing with both characters. In Beast Heart, that happened to be their self-identities. How does Gabrielle see herself, in relation to the world? How about Kemple? And how do they view themselves, in relation to each other?
The reader is being asked to travel on a journey with two different POVs as their literary “eyes”, so it makes sense to treat both perspectives as two ends of a scale: push and pull. Weight and counterweight. Opposite ends of a spectrum, with the reader in the unique position of existing in the middle.
Usually, readers expect two perspectives like this will eventually come together, either in a clash of conflict, or in a unifying merge. Possibly a mixture of both. Whatever the outcome, the story needs to reach some kind of satisfying cadence, one that can only be created by the combining of notes that, until that point, seemed completely discordant.
I’d like to say that I achieved that in Beast Heart, but a lot depends on the reader. What sounds like steam whistling through gears, to one ear, might very well sound like claws tearing through skin, to another.
And in the end, they’d both be right.

Giveaway :

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#MiniBlogBlitz #RachelsRandomResources @rararesources / #GuestPost : One Last Shot – Stephen Anthony Brotherton @FreddieJoJo1

– ‘The Magic of Wor(l)ds’ blog is a hobby, reviews and other bookish stuff on this site are done for free. –

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Today I’m on the ‘One Last Shot’ blogtour, organised by Rachel’s Random Resources.
To promote this book I have a guest post written by its author, Stephen Anthony Brotherton, but before I let you read it first some ‘basic’ information.

About the Author :

g2mAPdzwI was born in Walsall, grew up in the West Midlands and now live in Telford with my two cats, Boris and Tai.
After working in the health and social care sector for over thirty years, I have now written the trilogy that has been rooted in my head for most of my life.
The Shots trilogy is based on a first love relationship I had as a teenager. It tells the story of Freddie and Jo-Jo, who are reunited in a coffee shop three decades after the end of their teenage romance. How they originally met, why they parted, what happens in their lives apart, and what happens when they reunite is all told through a series of first person vignettes.
Getting these stories down on paper has been a cathartic process. I hope you enjoy them.

Social Media Links:
Instagram
Twitter

Synopsis :

DN8KAyPwCAN FIRST LOVE EVER BE REIGNITED?
One Last Shot concludes the trilogy of Freddie and Jo-Jo, which has moved through time in a series of flashbacks, showing how the couple fell in love as teenagers, why they drifted apart, what happened in their lives away from each other, and what happens when they meet up again over three decades later. At the end of the second book, An Extra Shot, Jo-Jo tells Freddie about her dark secret. Confused, vulnerable and in a state of shock, he says he needs time to think about what to do next. Jo-Jo’s right to be worried. Freddie doesn’t react well…

Purchase Links:
Blackwells
Waterstones
Amazon UK
Amazon US

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Guest Post :

An original, unpublished short story by Stephen Anthony Brotherton, Author of the Shots trilogy

Dancing with Dad

My big sister, Emma, was always sitting on Dad’s knee. I’d watch them. ‘She’s getting too big,’ I’d tell myself. ‘It’ll soon be my turn.’ That’s what I thought right up until our Tina’s seventh birthday party when I walked into the front room and there she was, the baby, sitting on his lap. ‘Take a big breath our Tina and blow out your candles.’
She blew spit all over the cake.
I waited for him to scold her, but he tousled her hair and tickled her until she giggled. ‘You’re my favourite,’ he said. ‘You’re my special girl.’
Emma gave me a strange look and Mum looked at the floor. I went and sat on the bottom step of the stairs and Mum came and sat next to me. I buried my face in her housecoat. She smelt of Pledge and Fairy Liquid. ‘Why doesn’t he love me, Mum?’
‘I love you,’ she said, stroking my hair and making a shushing noise.

****

I remember when I first noticed the thing between Dad and Emma. I got home early from school, went to the sink to get a glass of water and I could see them through the kitchen window. They were playing swing. Dad was pushing her higher and higher and she was squealing louder and louder.
‘Stop it, Dad. Stop it.’
He moved to the front of the swing and held out his arms.
‘Jump, my darling. Jump.’
Emma shook her head and laughed as the swing went back up.
‘Jump,’ he said again.
She let go and two seconds later he caught her and slid her slowly to the floor. He kissed her forehead. ‘Well done,’ he said. ‘My big, brave girl.’
‘That was great, Dad. Can we do again?’
‘Of course we can, sweetheart.’
I ran outside. ‘Can I have a go, Dad?’
‘After me,’ said Emma, running back to the swing. ‘I want to go higher this time.’
‘Perhaps later,’ he said. ‘You both need to get ready for tea.’
He walked into the house.
Emma glared at me. ‘Why do you have spoil everything?’ she said.

****

A few weeks before Tina’s party, we were at my cousin Tanya’s wedding. Spandau Ballet’s ‘True’ started up and Dad walked across the dance floor towards me. He put his arm around my waist and started waltzing me round the room.
‘You’re so headstrong,’ he whispered. ‘Why can’t you be more like your sisters?’
‘I can, Dad.’
I could smell his tangy Aramis aftershave as he spun me faster and faster. I had to concentrate really hard to keep up with him. ‘Don’t let him down,’ I kept telling myself. I couldn’t see Mum, but I knew she was watching, and our Emma, and our Tina. And then he stopped dancing and held me at arm’s length. ‘You’re no good at keeping secrets, Becky,’ he said. ‘I could never trust you.’
‘I am, Dad. I am.’
He walked away in the direction of the bar.
Mum came over and hugged me. ‘What does he mean, Mum? I can keep secrets.’
‘It’s not you sweetheart,’ she said. ‘There’s nothing wrong with any of you.’
I spent the rest of the night trying to work it out, watching him drinking beer with my uncles, everyone patting him on the back and laughing at his jokes.

****

The day it all came out, I’d been out shopping with Mum. Dad said the cup final was on telly and he’d stayed at home with Tina. Mum got one of her headaches and we came back early.
‘We’re back, Joe,’ she shouted, throwing the carrier bags on the hall floor.
Silence.
‘Where’s Dad?’ I said.
We heard a floorboard creak in the spare room and then we heard Tina’s voice.
‘They’re upstairs,’ I said, walking up a few steps.
Dad appeared on the landing. He wasn’t wearing his tie and the top three buttons of his shirt were undone. I could see his grey chest hairs and the start of his anchor tattoo.
‘Hello love,’ he said.
Mum ran upstairs and started punching him. ‘Get out of my house,’ she shouted. ‘Get out of my house.’

****

When I last saw Dad, I was taking our Katy to the doctors for her asthma check and he was standing at the bus stop.
Prison had wrinkled him, given him a stoop.
I pulled my little girl closer as I walked by.

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The Magic of Wor(l)ds

#VirtualBookTour #RABTBookTours @RABTBookTours / #GuestPost : Hazards in Hampshire #HazardsinHampshire – Emma Dakin @author_mcrook

– ‘The Magic of Wor(l)ds’ blog is a hobby, reviews and other bookish stuff on this site are done for free. –

Hazards in Hampshire Tour Banner

Today I’m on the ‘Hazards in Hampshire’ blogtour, organised by RABT Book Tours.
To promote this book I have a Guest Post, but before I let you read it first some ‘basic’ information.

About the Author :

websized-BCON-2119-EditEmma Dakin has written over thirty published books, many under the name of Marion Crook. She completed her PhD in education, went on to teach at university and continued to write, because writing, as most readers know, is at least a compulsion, if not an addiction. After years of reading every cozy mystery she could find, Emma wrote Hazards in Hampshire: The British Book Tour Mysteries. One of the joys of setting a novel in Britain is the need to travel there. She enjoyed absorbing the differences in attitude in the distinct British counties and tried to interpret the Cornish accent (next book) and the unique culture of Yorkshire (third book). She lives on the Sunshine Coast, near Vancouver, Canada, but claims her British ancestors “keep popping into my head with their purely British remarks”.

Website/Blog
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Goodreads

Synopsis :

cover front Dec 19Claire Barclay returns to England from her last post in Seattle, buying a house in a village and settling down at forty-six. She responds to an invitation to tea and stumbles upon the murdered body of Mrs. Paulson, a prominent villager. As the first person to find the victim, she is one of the first to be investigated. She answers the persistent questions of Detective Inspector Mark Evans and is determined to give him another suspect. Mrs. Paulson had been the president of the local Mystery Books Club? Was the motive for murder located in the archives of the book club? She had lived in the village all her life, been involved in many organizations and societies and knew many secrets of the villagers. Was one secret too dangerous for her to keep? She had been wealthy and left her money to a member of the club. Could the legatee have been impatient for her inheritance? Three ladies from San Francisco join Claire’s book tour and, with avid curiosity, help Claire investigate the murder. Complicated by Claire`s need to care for her newly acquired Cavalier King Charles Spaniel, they travel through Hampshire, Sussex and Oxfordshire to visit sites of mystery writers. The tourists are enthusiastic about mystery novels and also about the local murder and offer imaginative solutions. Claire listens to their advice, attempting to ferret out the story behind the murder while trying not to impede the official enquiry of the increasingly attractive Detective Inspector Mark Evans.
An independent woman, her dog and murder. Throw in a Hampshire village and you have the perfect setting for a cozy.

Amazon
Barnes and Noble
IndieBound
Local bookstores and libraries

Hazards in Hampshire Book Banner

Guest Post :

“What an easy life,” a friend who should know better said. “You just sit there and characters and plots come to you.” I wish it was so. Occasionally, a marvelous character drops into my mind, or a fabulous climax stuns me with its drama. But I have to work to find my stories. I may have the fabulous climax in mind but spend three weeks writing out possible motivations for the villain, or logical reasons why the victim would be walking past the pond at just the right time for the murder to occur. I create and toss out many possibilities until I find one that is perfect.
Plotting can be painful, but characters usually come to me with quirks and diction well-established. Sometimes, they change, as the plot presses on them–and they should change as that is how we grow–but usually, I have a rich group of characters at the beginning. I’m grateful. In the British Book Tour Mysteries I meet a new gaggle of tourists in every book and I love them.
The research part of writing can be a great deal of fun. I have been in pubs and boutique hotels in Hampshire where Hazards in Hampshire is set. I’ve wandered through small villages and talked to people on trains and busses. I’ve interviewed locals about the plants in the hedgerows, police about their duties and read through local papers and library archies. “You’re working?” they ask incredulously. I solemnly assure them that I am. I do write down everything at the end of the day and keep brochures to consult when I get home.
I work hard at emotional honesty. If I want to connect with readers, I need to understand emotions, because it is emotions that connect us. That takes understanding of my own emotions. That’s awkward. I’d just as soon let my characters have all the feelings. L. M. Montgomery (Anne of Green Gables) said about someone she knew that is was “always torturing himself and others on the rack of self-analysis”. That’s what writers do. I’ve learned to live with it.
Observing others and noting their expressions, their concerns and their unique problem-solving techniques is highly entertaining as well as instructive. I try to give what I have learned from others to my characters so my readers can share in the joy of it all. Once I get the hard work out of the way and just re-write, I have a marvelous time and hope my readers will as well. In the character of Claire Barclay, a reader can travel to England, enjoy the distinctive setting and participate in the mystery. An independent woman, her dog and murder. Throw in a Hampshire village and you have the perfect setting for a cozy.

Giveaway:

3 ebook of Hazards in Hampshire The British book Tour Mysteries Book I

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Virtual Book Tour Organized By:

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RABT Book Tours

#BlogTour #DamppebblesBlogTours @damppebbles / #GuestPost : The Awful Truth About the Sushing Prize #TheAwfulTruthAboutTheSushingPrize – Marco Ocram #MarcoOcram @denishaughnessy @TinyFoxPress

– ‘The Magic of Wor(l)ds’ blog is a hobby, reviews and other bookish stuff on this site are done for free. –

The Awful Truth About the Sushing Prize banner

Today I’m on the ‘The Awful Truth About the Sushing Prize’ blogtour, organised by Damppebbles Blog Tour.
To promote this book I have a guest post, but before I let you read it first some ‘basic’ information.

About the Author :

Marco Ocram is the world’s first self-written author-cum-protagonist. First imagined in 2015, he has gone on to infect the world of literature with two awful anti-thrillers which subvert the tropes of mainstream fiction. Heavily dosed with nuanced intertextuality, the books make little literal sense, and will strike you either as hilarious spoofs or utter nonsense, depending upon your taste in such matters.

Social Media:
Twitter
Website

Synopsis :

The Awful Truth About The Sushing Prize coverShould I tell him about Sushing or play dumb?
Sticking in my comfort zone, I played dumb.
Writer Marco Ocram has a secret superpower—whatever he writes actually happens, there and then. Hoping to win the million-dollar Sushing Prize, he uses his powers to write a true-crime thriller, quickly discovering a freakish murder. But Marco has a major problem—he’s a total idiot who can’t see beyond his next sentence. Losing control of his plot and his characters, and breaking all the rules of fiction, Marco writes himself into every kind of trouble, until only the world’s most incredible ending can save his bacon.
Fast, funny, and utterly different, welcome to the weird world of The Awful Truth.

Purchase Links:
Amazon UK
Amazon US
Waterstones
Book Depository

Publishing Information:
Published in paperback and digital formats by Tiny Fox Press on 4th June 2019.

Guest Post :

Today we have a guest post from Denis Shaughnessy, who explains why he decided to break all the rules of writing in his surreal comedy The Awful Truth about The Sushing Prize, one of the strangest novels of the year. But first, here’s what some other reviewers thought about the book.

Steph Warren said…
This has to go down as my most highlighted ebook to date! Nearly every page brought another tongue-in-cheek spoof of writing, reading, fiction in general, or crime fiction in particular. I just haven’t read another book quite like it!
The story follows Marco Ocram, a bad writer and something of an idiot all round, as he writes his own crime adventure while it occurs. It’s unbelievably meta and incredibly good fun.

N.N. Light said…
This was a book that was unlike any book I have ever read before. For the first half, this was the FUNNIEST book I have ever read. More than one person had their lunch disrupted by my guffawing at the top of my lungs. So outstandingly original and ridiculous, I couldn’t read a sentence without a chuckle.

Alex Austin said…
The Awful Truth is endlessly clever, on the mark with its targets and simply funny. My favorite scenes include Ocram meeting the Pope, the deciphering of computer code and Ocram on trial for murder (the courtroom scene turned on its head). If occasionally a joke doesn’t work, it’s probably a setup for a later one that will pay off in spades. It is also a novel about the writing process, and as such it has enormous fun with literary terms, writing strategies and the publishing industry itself. There were times when the intensity of language combined with self-reference reminded me of Flann O’Brien’s At Swim-Two-Birds.

Chris Wyatt said…
This brilliantly written book has tiny veins of hilarity marbled entirely throughout its pages, and only the very observant, or the completely insane, will pick up on all of them. I have never awarded five stars for a book before, and some will argue that it has to be perfect to merit such an award. I present my case. Find me a book even remotely similar, then we’ll be able to compare. Not just unique… but, brilliantly so!

DENIS’S POST

Is literature too conservative? As part of my cheating meticulous preparations for this hand-crafted, limited edition guest post, I checked with Google, who told me, to my utter astonishment, that no-one’s asked the question before. So we’re breaking entirely new philosophical ground by talking about it!
Imagine you’re in a library, its shelves laden with literary treasures from the 18th century to the 21st. Differing in subject and style, they’re essentially the same product, conforming to unquestioned rules about how books should be written. Now wave your magic wand, sprinkle the pixie dust, leave behind a trail of Oxford commas, and you’re in an art gallery. Marvel at the variety of paintings, from the beautifully realistic to the utterly bizarre and abstract. Why has painting changed so much when literature has changed so little? Why such diversity in one art form, when we still expect books to be written pretty much as they were three hundred years ago?
Maybe it’s something to do with the thousands of articles on the Internet about writing—articles that coach the would-be author to write like everyone else does. It’s as if there were an army of people writing advice for would-be popstars, telling them all to write classical music. Call me a rebel if you like, but I decided it was time someone wrote a book in a different way, and if no-one else was stupid enough to give it a go, I’d try it myself.
By conventional standards, The Awful Truth about The Sushing Prize is an awful book. Its author, Marco, who wasn’t very bright to begin with, has been coached by his mentor to write as Jackson Pollock paints. ‘Pouring words onto paper without thought or revision,’ Marco makes up the story as he goes along, leaving a trail of spelling mistakes, pleonasms, dodgy dialogue, discontinuities, and every other kind of mistake an incompetent writer might make, all of which he acknowledges to you, his beloved reader. To make his life more complicated, Marco is his own protagonist, too distracted by his role in the chaotic action to be able to give enough thought to writing it. The conceptual space between Marco the writer and Marco the character doesn’t exist in conventional books, and it opens up a new set of opportunities for jokes and wordplay. The overall effect is surreal and absurd, and you might love it or hate it. I hope you love it as much as I do.

The Magic of Wor(l)ds

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#BlogTour #RachelsRandomResources @rararesources / #GuestPost : Beyond The Yew Tree – Rachel Walkley @RachelJWalkley

– ‘The Magic of Wor(l)ds’ blog is a hobby, reviews and other bookish stuff on this site are done for free. –

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Today I’m on the ‘Beyond The Yew Tree’ blogtour, organised by Rachel’s Random Resources.
To promote this book I have a guest post written by its author, but before I let you read it first some ‘basic’ information.

About the Author :

Wcz-pDdQAspiring writer who pens Women’s Fiction and magical tales about family secrets.
What else?
An East Anglian turned Northerner – almost.
Information professional, always.
Biologist, in my memories.
Archivist, when required.
Amateur pianist and flautist.
Reluctant gardener.
Scribbler of pictures.
And forever…. a mother and wife.
Oh, not forgetting, cat lover!

Social Media Links:
Goodreads
Twitter
Facebook
Instagram
Newsletter

Synopsis :

MDXpz8YgWhispers in the courtroom.
Only one juror hears them.
Can Laura unravel the truth by the end of the trial?
In an old courtroom, a hissing voice distracts shy juror, Laura, and at night recurring nightmares transport her to a Victorian gaol and the company of a wretched woman.
Although burdened by her own secret guilt, and struggling to form meaningful relationships, Laura isn’t one to give up easily when faced with an extraordinary situation.
The child-like whispers lead Laura to an old prison graveyard, where she teams up with enthusiastic museum curator, Sean. He believes a missing manuscript is the key to understanding her haunting dreams. But nobody knows if it actually exists.
Laura is confronted with the fate of two people – the man in the dock accused of defrauding a charity for the blind, and the restless spirit of a woman hanged over a century ago for murder. If Sean is the companion she needs in her life, will he believe her when she realises that the two mysteries are converging around a long-forgotten child who only Laura can hear?
Ordinary women.
Extraordinary experiences.

Purchase Links:
Amazon UK
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Guest Post :

Location, Location, Location

When I set out to write my first book, The Women of Heachley Hall, I knew the book would be based almost entirely in one location, the house of the title. My intention was to make it a character with a personality of its own. I drew floor plans so I could see how people moved around the house and I hunted around the internet for images that matched my visions of the interior – these are now on a Pinterest board. As for the actual location of the house, it’s not real, although if you were to ask me to point to a spot on the map, I know precisely where the house and where its neighbouring fictional village is located. About them are genuine locations that I describe in the book, and some of these I have visited and describe based on personal experiences. As for Heachley Hall, a few readers comment how the house feels like another character in the book, which delights me still.
Location is often key to a book’s story. For the fantasy writers, their Discworlds and MiddleEarths are critical to the joy of world building and they start with an empty canvas to populate. Most writers though begin with real places in mind. For my current release, Beyond the Yew Tree, the location was the spark that initiated the plot. I knew I wanted an old courthouse, and I didn’t want to use my local one. Once I’d discovered Lincoln’s old courthouse, I hit a gold nugget of useful material. My plot needed a graveyard – it’s right there in the castle walls, and a prison, which is now a museum, and it created scope for another one of my characters: Sean, the curator. Lincoln became my perfect location and I even incorporated the cathedral, which is why it’s on the cover.
But how far do you go with a location, especially a real place? I took advice from other authors and the general rule seems to be don’t identify the street you live on – obviously, or ones that are connected to your life. You could go to the extreme of revealing nothing. I’ve read a book describing a city, one that seemed recognisable, but in fact was never given a name. It could be any city in the UK. Or you could describe the city in all its glory then give it another name. Gotham City is New York City, yeah?
Don’t put at risk the anonymity of real people by using their properties – imagine if JK Rowling had used a real street and house for Harry Potter’s home? As it is the set locations in the film have become the focal point for fans of her books. The best advice I had was use a location but create fake streets or buildings, which is what I did for Beyond the Yew Tree. Or simply don’t name the street where the action happens.
The exception to the rule of using real places is suspended for historical fiction where your characters are factually accurate, and the places associated with them might still exist. For this genre, your readers might be a bit miffed to discover you’re making stuff up about their favourite historical person.
I wandered about on Google Streetview, familiarising myself with the streets of Lincoln, and I know roughly where my fictional lanes are, and for the historical aspect of the novel, I consulted maps of old Lincoln that are available online. Twenty years ago, how would I have done all this so easily from my desk? It’s a fortunate thing to be a writer these days as the research is quicker and less problematic.
By the end of writing Beyond the Yew Tree I’d added to Lincolnshire a number of entirely made-up places and situated them amongst the real city and its surroundings. My advice is if you ever read a book and fancy visiting the locations described – check the map first!

Giveaway :

Win One copy of The Last Thing She Said or The Woman of Heachley Hall (Open INT)
• If the winner is in the UK then it will be a print copy, otherwise International winner is e-book.
Terms and Conditions – Worldwide entries welcome. Please enter using the Rafflecopter box below. The winner will be selected at random via Rafflecopter from all valid entries and will be notified by Twitter and/or email. If no response is received within 7 days then Rachel’s Random Resources reserves the right to select an alternative winner. Open to all entrants aged 18 or over. Any personal data given as part of the competition entry is used for this purpose only and will not be shared with third parties, with the exception of the winners’ information. This will passed to the giveaway organiser and used only for fulfilment of the prize, after which time Rachel’s Random Resources will delete the data. I am not responsible for despatch or delivery of the prize.

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The Magic of Wor(l)ds

#BlogTour #RachelsRandomResources @rararesources / #GuestPost : All The Beautiful Liars – Sylvia Petter @SylviaAPetter @EyeAndLightning

– ‘The Magic of Wor(l)ds’ blog is a hobby, reviews and other bookish stuff on this site are done for free. –

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Today I’m on the ‘All The Beautiful Liars’ blogtour, organised by Rachel’s Random Resources.
To promote this book I have a guest post written by its author, but before I let you read it first some ‘basic’ information.

About the Author :

VEBw1PNwSylvia Petter was born in Vienna but grew up in Australia, which makes her Austr(al)ian.
She started writing fiction in 1993 and has published three story collections, The Past Present, Back Burning and Mercury Blobs. She has a PhD in Creative Writing from the University of New South Wales.
After living for 25 years in Switzerland, where she was a founding member of the Geneva Writers’ Group, she now lives in Vienna once more.

Website
Twitter

Synopsis :

lTsqlvCwHow true are the family histories that tell us who we are and where we come from? Who knows how much all the beautiful liars have embargoed or embellished the truth?
During a long flight from Europe to Sydney to bury her mother, Australian expat Katrina Klain reviews the fading narrative of her family and her long quest to understand her true origins. This has already taken her to Vienna, where she met her Uncle Harald who embezzled the Austrian government out of millions, as well as Carl Sokorny, the godson of one of Hitler’s most notorious generals, and then on to Geneva and Berlin. Not only were her family caught up with the Nazis, they also turn out to have been involved with the Stasi in post-war East Germany.
It’s a lot to come to terms with, but there are more revelations in store. After the funeral, she finds letters that reveal a dramatic twist which means her own identity must take a radical shift. Will these discoveries enable her to complete the puzzle of her family’s past?
Inspired by her own life story, Sylvia Petter’s enthralling fictional memoir set between the new world and the old is a powerful tale about making peace with the past and finding closure for the future.

Amazon UK
Amazon US

Guest Post :

Dear Stefanie,
Thanks for having me on your blog. I thought a post about language might be of interest to you because different languages not only underpin my writing and Katrina Klain´s, but also your own.
So here goes:

When your mother´s tongue is not your mother tongue

Like Katrina Klain´s, my parents were of German-speaking background, but we rarely, if at all, spoke German at home in Sydney, Australia. Who needed German in 50s Australia when “new Australian” had a certain stigma to it and no one knew how long it would take to really belong?
I can´t even remember ever having spoken German at home, although I must have heard it since Mum had been thrown in at the proverbial deep end. Cliché alert! We´ll get to that later.
Lousy in maths, I opted for languages (French and German) – hey, I could speak English – and after graduation took off to see the world. In Vienna, the city of my birth, I studied translation, with my closest brush with fame coming via my teacher doing simultaneous interpretation of the moon landing on tv. And that brush is what sent me to Geneva via Helsinki as a rookie translator at an international conference on security and cooperation in Europe. (Can you see how things are beginning to add up?) Already in Vienna, I had been starting to lose my English mother tongue – so easy when all the students were multilingual, so deforming though because I got lazy and didn´t bother to look for the correct words, knowing that anyway, I´d be understood in my group of like minds. In Geneva, where French was added to the mix, I was talking a trilingual mish-mash, until I decided I needed my own words and wanted to learn how to write them. So, I had to learn backwards and rediscover my mother tongue.
Katrina Klain in Vienna starts writing poems to sort out her feelings about home and belonging. The different languages open themselves to rich images and word games as she forgets translation and takes words at face value – seeing rats in the Rathaus or Town Hall, for example. New images can lead to all sorts of associations that can make for fresh metaphors. But there is also a danger in the early days of seeking a voice when no longer in the country of one’s mother tongue: the cliché lies in wait to insinuate itself as a fresh take into phrases and sentences.
Clichés felt so fresh to me perhaps because they were disguised as comfort blankets. But reading in the mother tongue more than in the language of the country one is in can help here, never mind calls for integration for, after all, the tone drives the music. What a translation! Another one for the rat house, no doubt.
Writing, though is what saved me, and it also saves Katrina, who must finish writing her story in time to escape the Panopticon and take her life in her own hands, with her own words, to live in her own time.
I hope this throws some light on the journey of Katrina Klain, and my own.

Best,
Sylvia Petter

The Magic of Wor(l)ds

#OneDayBlogBlitz #RachelsRandomResources @rararesources / #GuestPost : 52 Weeks of Writing Author Journal and Planner – Mariëlle S. Smith

– ‘The Magic of Wor(l)ds’ blog is a hobby, reviews and other bookish stuff on this site are done for free. –

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Today I’m on the ‘52 Weeks of Writing Author Journal and Planner’ blogtour, organised by Rachel’s Random Resources.
To promote this book I have a guest post written by its author, but before I let you read it first some ‘basic’ information.

About the Author :

YiTDhOSQMariëlle S. Smith is a coach for writers and other creatives, an editor, (ghost) writer, and custom retreat organiser. In 2019, she moved to Cyprus, and island in the Mediterranean Sea, where she organises private writer’s retreats, is inspired 24/7, and feeds more stray cats than she can count.

Social Media Links:
Facebook
Instagram
YouTube
Website

Synopsis :

KwJ4vdgQAre you ready to become the writer you were always meant to be?
52 Weeks of Writing will get you cracking by making you plan, track, reflect on, and check in with your progress and goals an entire year long.
52 Weeks of Writing will help you dig deep by offering questions and writing prompts designed to unravel whatever truths about your writing you’re ready for.
52 Weeks of Writing will keep you inspired by delivering a thought-provoking writing quote every week.
– Do you struggle with setting goals that reflect your daily reality?
– Do you want to practise breaking goals down into manageable chunks?
– Would you like more insight into your writing habit(s) and figure out why you keep getting in your own way?
– And do you want to create a sustainable writing practice that honours your needs and desires as a writer?
Then the 52 Weeks of Writing: Author Journal and Planner is for you.
52 Weeks of Writing brings together every lesson Mariëlle S. Smith has learned as a writing coach and writer. Wary as she is of comparisonitis and unhealthy competition, this author journal and planner was designed to help writers develop and fine-tune a practice that works for them.
If you’re ready to get out of your own way and become the writer you’re meant to be, pick up your copy of 52 Weeks of Writing today.

Purchase Link:
Amazon

Guest Post :

A safe space to get out of your own way
Nothing beats 1:1 advice.
As a writing coach, I know that. I live and breathe that. But, I also know that good writing coaches don’t come cheap. No matter how much you’re stuck or afraid to even begin, hiring one just isn’t always possible.
Knowing that there are more people out there than I can help one on one hit me hard last year. While no journal or planner can be a substiture for an actual writing coach, it’s when I started to look for ways to turn my coaching material into something that would be more accesible and have a wider reach.
The result is 52 Weeks of Writing. Everything I’ve learned over the past several years—as a writing coach, a writer, and even an editor—I poured into this author journal and planner.
What did I want this journal and planner to be? A safe space for writers to figure out why they keep getting in their own way as they dream up where they would like to be. Despite me not actually being there in real time as you go through the planning, the questions, the writing quotes, and prompts, I wanted 52 Weeks of Writing to bridge that gap as best as I could.
And with success it seems. As one reviewer on Amazon said, ‘it’s like having a writing coach sit down with you every week’.
Planning isn’t enough
Planning alone only gets us so far. Journaling about and reflecting on our plans and achievements, that’s what gets us to the root of our struggles. And we need to get to the root if we want to heal and move towards the goals we dreamed up.
As I write these words, I’m sitting in my sea-view apartment on the coast of Cyprus, a small island in the middle of the Mediterranean Sea. Every day, I get to do what I love—I write, and I help other writers do the same. I’ve published eleven books in the past year alone. However, my life wasn’t always like this. In fact, it looked nothing like it until quite recently.
Why? Because, until quite recently, I avoided journaling at all costs.
I’ve been into yoga for about eight years. But, while I’ve embraced many of the yogic principles, I never got into the whole being mindful, sitting still, allowing thoughts to come up thing.
We avoid things for a reason. For me, it was the fear of uncovering why I wasn’t happy. I kept telling myself I was content, but truth is I wasn’t even that. I was at a concert with a friend two and a half years ago when I suddenly felt so alive it hit me just how dead I felt on the inside on other days.
Honesty and courage
The next day, I bought a brand-new journal and started writing. I’d journaled before, and it’d always felt such a useless exercise. They say writing it down—like saying it aloud—makes it real, but we underestimate how easy it is to forget what we’ve spelled out. Especially when there’s something large at stake, like realising you’re still not doing what it takes to be where you want to be.
This time, however, I knew just planning wouldn’t get me there. Not without reflection. It takes writing it down, rereading your own words, and then having the guts to be honest with yourself again and again. About where you truly want to be. What is keeping you back. Why you’re letting that get in the way. My journal became the safe space where I could figure things out once and for all.
Fast forward a couple of years, I quit my day job and moved countries to write and help others write full-time. Now, I’m not saying I wouldn’t have gotten there without journaling, but if I hadn’t started to journal like I meant it, I wouldn’t have gotten here this fast.
For one thing, I would have never created 52 Weeks of Writing. I wouldn’t have published any of those eleven books, to be honest. And while I know it’s not 1:1 advice, let me tell you this: if I was able to get out of my own way enough to start planning for the life I’ve always wanted, so can you.
All you need is a safe space and the courage to look inside. Whether that space comes in the shape of a journal or that of one on one sesssions with your writing coach.

Giveaway :

Win
• THREE paperback copies of the 52 Weeks of Writing Author Journal and Planner
• TWO paperback copies of Tarot for Creatives: 21 Tarot Spreads to (Re)Connect to Your Intuition and Ignite That Creative Spark
• ONE coaching session
via this link.

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The Magic of Wor(l)ds