#BlogTour #RandRBookTours @RRBookTours1 @Shanannigans81 / #QandAs : After Darkness – J.F.Johns @Writersmania #Books #YA #Dystopian #Scifi

– ‘The Magic of Wor(l)ds’ blog is a hobby, reviews and other bookish stuff on this site are done for free. –

Tour Banner(2)

Today I’m on the ‘After Darkness’ blogtour, organised by R&R Book Tours.
To promote this book I have a Q&As post, but before I let you read it first some ‘basic’ information.

About the Author :

Author Pic(2)J.F.Johns is 27 years old and was born and raised in Spain. She studied English Literature and Creative Writing at ARU in Cambridge, UK.
She won the Indie Book Awards 2017 for best book written by an author under the age of 25, and was a finalist for best book cover with her novel Eternal Darkness.
She’s an animal lover, and spends her free time playing with her adopted dog and rescued cat, drinking too much coffee and posting book photos on her Instagram.
She believes in the art of dramatic sighing and eye rolling. She works as a ninja, but has been told several times that she’s not very good at her job.

Goodreads
Instagram
Twitter

Synopsis :

Book Cover(2)Title: After Darkness (Book One)
Publication Date: April 14th, 2020
Genre: YA Dystopian

Year 2160
RULE #.1
Humans AND Cyborgs are prohibited from communicating in any shape or form with each other.
RULE #.2
Curfew is from 12 p.m until 7.30 a.m
Applicable to ALL citizens, humans AND cyborgs.
RULE #.3
All propaganda against the government, written or verbal is a crime.
RULE #.4
All the above laws if broken are punishable by death.
WELCOME TO THE NATION
Are you ready?

Goodreads

Amazon US
Amazon UK
Amazon ES

Q&A :

Hi

First of all thank you very much for taking the time to answer my questions, I really appreciate it. Here we go! 🙂
Thank YOU so much for taking the time to make these questions! I really appreciate it!

Can you, for those who don’t know you already, tell something about yourself and how you became an author?
Hi! My name is Jazmin and I’m from Spain! I’m 27 and currently working as an English teacher. I’ve always wanted to be an author. When I was really young I had so many stories to tell, but couldn’t write them down, so I’d draw them. When I turned 7, my parents bought our first computer and I discovered Microsof Word (sounds crazy nowadays!). I started writing and never stopped.
At the age of 22 I decided to try and self-publish my first book, and since then I’ve continued writing and publishing!

Which books did/do you love to read as a child/now as a grown-up?
When I was much younger I loved reading Harry Potter (still do) and series like Morganville Vampires. To be honest, most of the books I enjoyed when I was 12 I still enjoy now. Everything YA is my life!

Is there a writer whose brain you would love to pick for advice? Who would that be and why?
There are soooo many. I absolutely love Cassandra Clare. I truly believe that everything she writes is brilliant. I also love Charlaine Harris, and even though she doesn’t write YA, she is one of my fav authors!

If you could, which fictional character (from your own book(s) or someone else’s) would you like to invite for tea and why?
I would definitely choose Eric Thorn (from my trilogy Eternal Darkness). He is one of my favourite characters and I absolutely adore him. I think having a tea with him could be a roller-coster as you never know what he’s going to do. (And I love his dimples!)

Do you have some rituals or habits whilst writing?
I usually always clean a little and organise before sitting down to write. I will prepare a tea or coffee and maybe even read a chapter or two from a book. (To be honest, I’m a huge procrastinator, so I spend an hour or two doing things before actually sitting down to write!)

Where do you come up with your idea(s)? Do people in your life need to be worried? 😉
Usually my ideas will come from things I see in real life. Like someone might say something and then I’ll think… ‘What if that really happened?’ And slowly that starts to turn into a bigger picture. Other times I visualise a character and create a story around them.

Are you a plotter or do you go with the flow, as a pantser?
I totally go with the flow. I always have a rough idea of what I want in the book, and most of the time I have a beginning, middle and end planned, but everything else just flows as I write.

Can you give novice writers some tips (do’s/don’ts)?
Whatever you do (this can apply to anything in life, not just writing) give it your most. Work your butt off and believe in yourself and what you’ve done. Never give up. The writing world is really difficult, and even more so if you’re self-published. Most of the time you’ll want to give up, but don’t. At the end of the day, you write because you love to do so. Before you actually self-publish make sure you investigate the whole process because it’ll definitely make your life easier. And never be scared of critiscism. You will grow from it. That applies to bad reviews too. Don’t feel bad. The beauty of literature is that it is subjective, and therefore, everyone sees everything differently. Enter this world knowing that there will be people that absolutely HATE your work, but there will be others that love it.

What are your futureplans as an author?
I will keep writing. My book After Darkness has a sequel, so I will be working on that. I have a few more ideas, so I will be very busy the next few years working on new stories and marketing my old ones!

Last, but not least : Can you give my readers one teaser from your book, which is featured here on my blog, please?
This is a scene from my book, which I absolutely love and adore!

‘My name is Terra Underwood, by the way.’
‘Didn’t ask.’
‘I know, thought you should know anyway.’
She heard him sigh.
‘I’m Kalem.’ A few seconds passed and then, ‘Kalem Akuma.’
‘Akuma? Seriously?’
‘It means demon.’
She couldn’t help but think it was rather fitting.
‘Well, Underwood means ‘wood that is under.’ What exactly it’s under we’ll never know.’
‘Is that meant to be a joke?’
‘Everything I say is meant as a joke.’
She could almost hear him smile, and that brought her own lips to twist upwards. She closed her eyes, feeling suddenly at ease and comfortable.
‘Goodnight, wood that is under.’
Terra’s smile deepened.
‘Goodnight, demon.’

Isn’t that a great reason to pick up this book and to find out more?!
Thanks once again for this lovely interview, J.F.Johns.

The Magic of Wor(l)ds

Blog Tour Organized By:

R&R Button

R&R Book Tours

P.S. Are you an author (or publisher) who also wants a FREE interview like this? You can always contact me via e-mail!

 

#BlogTour #BookOnTheBrightSide @BOTBSPublicity / #QandAs : Fair Means Or Foul – Keith Wright @keithwwright

– ‘The Magic of Wor(l)ds’ blog is a hobby, reviews and other bookish stuff on this site are done for free. –

Fair Means Or Foul (1)

Today I’m on the ‘Fair Means Or Foul’ blogtour, organised by Book On The Bright Side.
To promote this book I have a Q&As post, but before I let you read it first some ‘basic’ information.

About the Author :

kw-recent-photo-dec-2019Keith Wright is the Author of the crime novels in the ‘Inspector Stark series’ available on Amazon, Kindle and Kindle Unlimited|Audiobook on Audible and iTunes.

Website
Twitter

Synopsis :

514vkmEPveLThe man sitting at the wheel of the car was 100 yards from his moment of destiny. He was oblivious to it, of course. Murderers don’t necessarily realise they are killers until a few seconds before it happens. Murderers are sometimes just like you and me. He would never have dreamed that such a thing might happen. Ridiculous. If anyone had told him that today was the day he would turn into a killer, he would have looked at them quizzically; questioning their sanity; instead of questioning his own.
The murder investigation into the death of a young girl at Nottingham’s Goose Fair throws up several suspects, close to home and further away. The stream of inquiries spirals into a climax, and suddenly another young life hangs in the balance.
Detective Inspector Stark and his team prepare to do anything to stop further bloodshed. They are willing to use any means necessary, whether it be fair means or foul.
In his fourth crime thriller, critically acclaimed author, Keith Wright, once again regales the stark reality of murder, derived from his hands-on experience as a CID detective sergeant working in an inner-city area.

Q&A :

Hi

First of all thank you very much for taking the time to answer my questions, I really appreciate it. Here we go! 🙂

Can you, for those who don’t know you already, tell something about yourself and how you became an author?
I am from a working class background and went to a comprehensive school before joining the police. When I retired from the force I went on to become Head of Corporate Investigations for a global retailer.
I still live in Nottingham with my partner Jackie.
I have four wonderful children, twins, Chris and Andy, who are also writers as well as being a teacher and another works for Cancer research. My son, Harry is at university and is an actor. Then there is the lovely chatterbox, Lily, who is 10 years old.
I began writing when in the police. I had always enjoyed reading crime stories, notably Ed McBain, and I thought I could combine real life experience as a Detective with good story telling.

Which books did/do you love to read as a child/now as a grown-up?
I enjoy autobiographies actually. I am interested in people and what makes us all tick and so I do enjoy reading a person’s life story. It doesn’t have to be someone famous, it can be anyone. As a young man, as I have mentioned, I read the fabulous American crime writer Ed McBain, from around the age of fifteen. Bizarrely I went on to meet him for dinner when I was speaking at the international mystery convention, which was a great honour for me. It was around 1994, I think. They say to never meet your heroes.

Is there a writer whose brain you would love to pick for advice? Who would that be and why?
I suppose it would have to be Charles Dickens. I love his work. Despite the victorian setting I think he was way ahead of his time, both with his characterisation, recklessness of style and lyrical prose.

If you could, which fictional character (from your own book(s) or someone else’s) would you like to invite for tea and why?
I would like to have tea with my main protagonist Detective Inspector David Stark. I would like to help him defeat his nemesis DI Lee Mole, and also give him some advice about his anxiety. He does not know what it is he is suffering from, but I want to help him. These things were not talked about as much in the 1980’s which is when my books are set.

Do you have some rituals or habits whilst writing?
I don’t go in for rituals as such. I am a very disciplined writer, I write pretty much all day every day. I guess I am used to the work ethic from my time in the police and private sector, which were quite hectic. I also enjoy it so much. I finally have the opportunity to devote myself to writing full time and I want to make the most of it and embrace it. I know this is a lucky situation to be in.

Where do you come up with your idea(s)? Do people in your life need to be worried? 😉
I tend to use my experience as a Detective Sergeant from back in the day for how things unfold. The ideas themselves however are from using my imagination. I can critically think and come up with ideas fairly easily. It is picking the right ones that can be the tricky bit.

Are you a plotter or do you go with the flow, as a pantser?
I have done both. I am going to have to say I am a ‘plantser,’ in other words a bit of both. I don’t want to write down huge skeletons any more, just key points, that I want to happen along with the theme and a little characterisation, for new characters.
This makes the process more enjoyable as I dont have a clue what is going to happen in the detail until the characters start involving themslves on the journey to the next junction.

Can you give novice writers some tips (do’s/don’ts)?
Do your own thing. Tell your own story. Be careful what advice you listen to, as most people know nothing, or if they do, it fits them not you. Keep it real. I share Stephen King’s advice to ‘show don’t tell,’ up to a point; while the bulk of the book should do this, sometimes you have to ‘tell’ to keep the pace right and avoid reader yawns.
Be adventurous, even reckless, if you can. Don’t be obsessed with too many writing ‘rules.’
Also make sure you write your ideas in your notes on your phone, if you don’t they will be gone forever, no matter how much you think you will remember them.
As for don’ts – Don’t write for anyone but yourself. (Some will disagree with this), if you are trying to write for others, who is it? Your neighbour? The postman? Be true to yourself. Not everyone is going to like your book. If you like it there is a chance that others will too and you can keep consistent and make the whole experience less arduous and more enjoyable.

What are your futureplans as an author?
I am in the process of completing a short story anthology I have compiled, which will go out later in the year. I am thrilled with it as it is a departure from my usual characters and contemporary. There is usually some sort of sting in the tale.
I have been working on my second Audio Book – ‘Trace and Eliminate.’ As with the first I have narrated it with my son Harry taking some parts and producing it for me. This will be out in the next two or three months, I would think.
I also have a little secret project I am undertaking.
And finally I will be starting my fifth book imminently.

Last, but not least : Can you give my readers one teaser from your book, which is featured here on my blog, please?
Thank you for the opportunity for us to chat about all things writing. I have thoroughly enjoyed it. I have selected the opening passage to ‘Fair Means Or Foul.’ I hope you like it and want to read on.

The man sitting at the wheel of the car was 100 yards from his moment of destiny. He was oblivious to it, of course. Murderers often don’t realise that becoming a killer is their fate until a few seconds before it happens. Murderers are sometimes just like you and me. We are not immune. There is no vaccine. He would never have dreamed that such a thing might happen. Ridiculous. If anyone had told him that today was the day he would turn into a killer, he would have looked at them quizzically; questioning their sanity; instead of questioning his own. His car was stuttering along in the grid-locked traffic. Stop. Start.
100 yards remained to the point of no return.
Nottingham’s Goose Fair, held the first weekend of October every year, hadn’t changed that much over the decades, it had just increased exponentially in size. Victorian children had slithered down the Helter-Skelter just the same as the squealing kids did now, in 1987, a hundred years later.
Thousands of people, young and old, streamed, from all directions, towards the beacon of bright lights and music. From a distance, they appeared hypnotically drawn to a pulsating Godhead, like a zombie apocalypse of shuffling, disengaged humanity, with only a Gregorian chant missing from the seemingly dystopian scene.
One of Nottingham’s oldest traditions, the Goose Fair, was more popular than ever, with a million visitors every year. A vast array of monstrous and exhilarating rides and ‘prize every time’ sideshows were the attractions nowadays, rather than a brace of geese and a cut of cheese, to temper Anglo Saxo hunger, such as it was when it first began. The living sea of humanity ebbed and flowed through the main thoroughfare, in a continuous wave, with tributaries of people filtering to various attractions, while attempting to avoid elbows to the body, spilled drinks, and stepped-upon toes.
This year, however, there would be a sinister visitor, a spectre at the feast. Death would lay its grim, heavy shadow over the festivities, as random and indiscriminate as ever. This was not the first time that murder had swung by the fairground, nor would it be the last, but it would be the saddest of them all.
90 yards.
The younger children, wide-eyed and agog, were lifted on and off the merry-go-rounds. At the same time, the teenagers queued at death-defying rides with appropriate names such as ‘The Paratrooper’ and the spinning cages of ‘Rock n Roll.’ The more adventurous fairgoer might head for the ‘Wall of Death’ where motorbikes would swirl around a caged wall at breakneck speed, and where occasionally people might indeed break their neck. Others would head towards ‘Ron Taylor’s Boxing Booth’. Boxing in various guises had been at the fair for two hundred years and had contributed to many fighters taking the sport up professionally. Here the local hard man could make the humbling discovery that he wasn’t as hard as he thought, or a delusional drunkard could embarrass himself for the jeering crowd’s entertainment.
Older visitors, stalwartly clutching their brandy snaps, were drawn nostalgically towards ‘The Cakewalk’ and would try to keep their feet, as the wooden floor jerked back and forth. Others headed for the more sedate, yet majestic galloping horses, of the ‘Carousel’.
80 yards.

Isn’t that a great reason to pick up this book and to find out more?!
Thanks once again for this lovely interview, Keith Wright.

The Magic of Wor(l)ds

 

 

 

P.S. Are you an author (or publisher) who also wants a FREE interview like this? You can always contact me via e-mail!

 

#BlogTour #SingaporeKillerBlogTour / #QandAs : Singapore Killer (An Ash Carter Thriller) #SingaporeKiller #WhoIsBlackJack – Murray Bailey @MurrayBaileybks

– ‘The Magic of Wor(l)ds’ blog is a hobby, reviews and other bookish stuff on this site are done for free. –

Singapore Killer Blogtour v4

Today I’m on the ‘Singapore Killer’ blogtour, organised by Murray Bailey.
To promote this book I have a Q&As post, but before I let you read it first some ‘basic’ information.

About the Author :

photoMurray Bailey got his first taste of success when he was published in the Times at 18. He also had articles published in his local newspaper. Although he went on to pursue a different career, he continued to write and became the editor of an international magazine and editor of 4 technical books.
His first work of fiction, I Dare You, was published in 2016. He has a series set around ancient Egypt (starting with Map of the Dead) and another set in 1950s Singapore.
Born in Manchester, England, Murray now lives on the South Coast with his wife and family.

Website
Twitter

Synopsis :

PUBLICATION DATE: 1 JUNE 2020 | PAPERBACK | £7.99 | HERITAGE BOOKS UK

51QHQdSfJoLA helicopter crash results in the pilot and a military policeman burned to death. It’s unclear what they were doing, but this was no accident and the name BlackJack is found at the scene.
Ash Carter knew that the Special Investigations Branch were tracking a killer, and when a faceless body is found in Perak, and he loses contact with the SIB, he races to north-east Malaya to help. There Carter discovers a mysterious town that the locals won’t talk about.
With no sign of his contact and a mounting body count, Carter is drawn into a dark case from which there seems no escape.

This is the 5th book of the series.
The 6th and final book is called Singapore Fire and will be released in 2021.

Amazon

Q&A :

Hi

First of all thank you very much for taking the time to answer my questions, I really appreciate it. Here we go! 🙂

Can you, for those who don’t know you already, tell something about yourself and how you became an author?
I’ve always written stories and thought I might become a journalist at one point. I had an article published in The Times at 18 as well as in my local paper. However I went off to university and studied Maths and Physics. I carried on writing—although rarely finishing a novel and for a year I became editor of a magazine and editor of a batch of technical books. However the breakthrough came from attending a course on structuring a novel. Suddenly it clicked into place and I could develop a plot.

Which books did/do you love to read as a child/now as a grown-up?
I loved Enid Blyton as a kid—especially The Secret Seven. Also adventure stories such as The Three Musketeers and Treasure Island. I’ve read—and written—most genres, but discovered crime-thrillers quite late. It was Michael Connelly who started me off and I became particularly inspired by Lee Child’s books. These days, I tend to be frustrated with other books when I find them formulaic, too linear or without surprises. I guess my head fills with stories that I want to read—so that’s what I write.

Is there a writer whose brain you would love to pick for advice? Who would that be and why?
I think I’d benefit most from meeting Harlen Coben. He’s so clever in the way he constructs his plots with hooks and twists.

If you could, which fictional character (from your own book(s) or someone else’s) would you like to invite for tea and why?
I’d like to meet Madam Chau, Ash’s grumpy but likeable assistant. Why? Because I’d like to get to know her better although I suspect she’d give me a hard time.

Do you have some rituals or habits whilst writing?
Not really. I have always tried to avoid such things so that I don’t become restricted. I used to have to find time to write—on the train to and from work, even in the bathroom while watching over the kids. These days I start as early as I can (because I’m a morning person) and just write. I believe in the principle that you can edit a bad page, but can’t edit a blank one. My objective is to write 1,500 words a day. The rest of the time is spent editing/researching/plotting… and occassionally working on a second book.

Where do you come up with your idea(s)? Do people in your life need to be worried? 😉
Writers always rely on real-life experiences. As a teenager my father told me I couldn’t be a good writer until I’d experienced life. I don’t know how he knew that, but I think he was right—certainly in my case. The Ash Carter series was inspired by my father who had been in the military police in Singapore in the 50s. I took him there for his 75th birthday for research and really saw the place through his eyes. It’s changed so much!

Are you a plotter or do you go with the flow, as a pantser?
I’m somewhere in between. For my first 2 novels (I Dare You and Map of the Dead) I plotted them thoroughly down to what happened in each chapter. I then found it far more exciting to roughly plot and let the story flow. I even surprise myself. Book 6 (Singapore Fire) is with the editor. The twist at the end of that one came as I was almost finished. I don’t know where it came from, but am so pleased. It’s the first time my wife has put a book down (by any author) and said, “It gave me goosebumps!”

Can you give novice writers some tips (do’s/don’ts)?
I found that attending a course on creative writing helped me understand structure. Before that, I think my early (pre-published) stories were fairly flat. I then found the best advise was to finish, set your story aside and come back to it fresh. Try and read it through a reader’s eyes.
And the Don’t? I guess my advice is to discover your own voice and don’t worry about convensions such as “show don’t tell”. Just write and then get feedback from your editor and early readers about what works and what doesn’t.

What are your futureplans as an author?
I have a whole bunch of WIPs: The final book in the Map of the Dead series (#3) and a stand alone crime story involving a group of treasure hunters. I’ve also got plans for book 3 of the Dare You series and a follow up to Black Creak White Lies.
I’m currently working on a standalone whodunit. I wasn’t intending it, but this week I also started writing a prequel to the Singapore series, possibly entitled Cyprus 6.

Last, but not least : Can you give my readers one teaser from your book, which is featured here on my blog, please?

“The man who had walked away from the helicopter crash—the man who had caused the crash—called himself BlackJack. It wasn’t particularly inventive or original. But it amused him because life was a game. A game of risk. A game of chance.”

This is part of a fabulous (short) promotional audio clip on Youtube with an extract read by the audio book narrator. You might like to listen.

Isn’t that a great reason to pick up this book and to find out more?!
Thanks once again for this lovely interview, Murray Bailey.

The Magic of Wor(l)ds

 

 

 

P.S. Are you an author (or publisher) who also wants a FREE interview like this? You can always contact me via e-mail!

 

#BlogTour #RachelsRandomResources @rararesources / #QandAs : When Darkness Begins – Tina O’Hailey @tohailey

– ‘The Magic of Wor(l)ds’ blog is a hobby, reviews and other bookish stuff on this site are done for free. –

hwmAM11U

Today I’m on the ‘When Darkness Begins’ blogtour, organised by Rachel’s Random Resources.
To promote this book I have a Q&As post, but before I let you read it first some ‘basic’ information.

About the Author :

SR0xbG_0Tina O’Hailey is a professor in animation and game programming, caver and occasional mapper of grim, wet, twisty caves (if she owes a friend a favor or loses a bet), whose passion is to be secluded on a mountain and to write whilst surrounded by small, furry dogs and hot coffee. Tina was once struck by lightning.
She has served as an artistic trainer for Walt Disney Feature Animation, Dreamworks and Electronic Arts. Any movie credit she has is minimal and usually found in the special thanks section. The meager credits do not account for the great honor it was to teach talented artists who worked on numerous feature films and games.
She has authored animation textbooks “Rig it Right” and “Hybrid Animation” published by Focal Press and the Darkness Universe novels “Absolute Darkness” and “When Darkness Begins” published by Black Rose Writing.

Social Media Links:
Facebook
Instagram
Twitter
WordPress
GoodReads

Synopsis :

tMJEfNKUIf you could change time to save your first love—even if it meant turning your back on the universe—would you?
It is time for the Vechey youth to earn their place as time-guardians. The near-immortal Vechey protect the universe from the devastating Manipulators—devourers of souls, mindless seekers of chaos. First, the youth must survive a mysterious and deadly ritual created by the all-powerful clan leader Eterili. Having regenerated thousands of times with the birth of each universe, Eterili is taking this one as hers and bending all in it to her grand designs.
Catha’s time-slipping skills are underdeveloped. She is time-blind—unable to see through time, unable to protect herself from the ritual. The Vechey shun her for being different. Her parents ignore her as if she were already dead.
Aithagg loves Catha unconditionally and will do anything to save her. He tries desperately to unlock the ritual’s mysteries and find a way to help Catha survive with him. Or will saving Catha enable the Manipulators to destroy the universe?

Purchase Links:
Amazon US
Amazon UK

Q&A :

Hi

First of all thank you very much for taking the time to answer my questions, I really appreciate it. Here we go! 🙂
Thanks to YOU!!!

Can you, for those who don’t know you already, tell something about yourself and how you became an author?
I’m an artist. I studied animation and worked as a trainer for artists at Walt Disney and Dreamworks and EA; helped artists on films like Lilo & Stich, Mulan, Prince of Egypt. As a trainer my specialty is putting 2D and 3D together, making the computer not scary for artists. That led to my second career as a professor of animation. As an artist I work with the more technical aspects of animation – making the 3d character and making it able to move (character set-up). I started writing textbooks about 2D/3D animation and character set-up in 2010, I think. It started because I heard a Focal Press editor was going to be visiting the University and I made sure to meet her. In the 30 seconds I had with her I pitched a 2D/3D – never been written before book. She asked for a proposal and I’ve been writing ever since.
However, I have always been working on a novel. Forever. I never liked them. Burned them. I joined a “Shiddy Writers’ Group” with some co-workers where we all encouraged each other to just write. Write the book. Even if it is bad. Write it. And if it was too much of a stinker – put another name on it. With their encouragement and critiques – I wrote my first published fiction novel Absolute Darkness. I self published it at first and then it was picked up by a publisher, Black Rose Writing. That book took a long time to write so I set out on this next book to see if I could come up with a rhythm to systematically write. I started When Darkness Begins as a NaNoWriMo (Novel November) manuscript and then polished it for publication. Now, I have a good writing methodology. I had one already in place for the non-fiction books. Fiction – that’s another story.

Which books did/do you love to read as a child/now as a grown-up?
I lived in nowhere with only my mother’s bookshelf to pick from. She fancied romances, which to this day I cannot read. However, she also had a good collection of King, V.C. Andrews, Erma Bombeck, Mary Higgins Clark, and The Chronicles of Narnia. I read all of them multiple times. The miniscule library at my school restricted me from the older books. I did not want to read Nancy Drew and the like. They could be read in an hour. I wanted meatier things.
I once somehow managed to checkout a book titled Nurse. I think by Judy Anderson? It was stories of a RN’s ward. Since by mother and grandmother were both RNs it was like listening to them. A teacher spotted me and took the book away, saying it was not age appropriate. My mother happened to have that same book on her bookshelf; somehow I had missed it. She sent me back to school with the book and told me, “Tell them that is your mother’s book. They can’t take it away from you.” And I did. I married a man who had a very good science fiction book collection and a few books by Chelsea Quinn Yarboro. It was her books that helped me find Alexander in my books.

Is there a writer whose brain you would love to pick for advice? Who would that be and why?
I did have the most fan-girl five minutes to speak with Chelsea Quinn Yarboro at DragonCon last year. We spoke about the rhythm of writing. I’d love to talk to her more about her research, her characters, how she keeps it all straight, and how she stays so prolific. Though, I blushed so very much when I met her (and let me explain—I meet and talk to a LOT of famous people. I interview them on stage for the University, or have to tour them. But, I never blush and fawn like I did when I met Quinn!) Also, I don’t like to go into crowds. For — reasons. However, I took myself (with my best friend at my side) to DragonCon and stalked all of Quinn’s panels until I could meet her and blush like a school-girl. I’d show you the picture, but I only received permission from her to put it on my facebook page and wouldn’t want to push that kindness by attaching it to an interview. (You can see it for yourself on my FB page through: https://www.facebook.com/tina.ohailey . Look for Quinn’s hot-pink hair and my red face and dorky smile!

If you could, which fictional character (from your own book(s) or someone else’s) would you like to invite for tea and why?
From my own books I would invite Alexander in for tea. He’s travelled the word for thousands of years and I don’t think he’s ever told those stories.

Do you have some rituals or habits whilst writing?
It depends on the time of day. Coffee or Wine. All other habits revolve around naming conventions and using Dropbox to constantly and always have my work backed up. Nothing actually resides on my laptop hard-drive—only a constantly synced folder of writing. I only lose work if I myself get confused and save over a file. True story. I was too fast with the command + s. I get a little freaked out when I’m on a plane writing since the folder can not sync. So, I use a flash drive to backup as I travel just in case my laptop dies. Guess that’s not weird, huh? I could lie to be more interesting: I recline on a wicker lounge chair that once graced the deck of the Titanic and will only wear purple socks when writing. Pink is for editing. But dear, polka-dots are for outlining.

Where do you come up with your idea(s)? Do people in your life need to be worried? 😉
The characters appear. In my first book I put names of friends on them just so I could keep the characters straight, and I’m horrible at names. But this book, When Darkness Begins, those characters were all themselves. I gave them weird pre-historic names and asked them who they were. Eterili literally appeared as I was writing. Her death-rattling anklet of teeth appeared, actually. I had to follow her for a while to realize I was writing in her universe and needed to respect that.
Having been around animation for so long, we’re taught to observe. See the nuance of people and things. That training helps me see gestures that some people have, how they hold their head, how one side of their mouth turns down in a frown when they smile, how they talk, etc. Those details do stick with me and I sprinkle them into the characters.
And yes, there are probably a handful of people who are worried that I will write about them and I haven’t. Yet.

Are you a plotter or do you go with the flow, as a pantser?
I’m a tried and true plotter. This book’s outline started in Columbia. I was at the airport early, a hurricane was coming through and I was hoping to get on a plane and out run the hurricane back to Tennessee. (I did, btw.) The rain was pounding, and the lights were flickering. The roads to the airport were flooded and I was early and alone at the airport. Also, I do not speak Spanish. I took out my little sketchbook and began making notes about the outline for this book. Now here you will think I am crazy, but I based the original flow of events on sacred geometry. I started with multiple circles, one for each person (I thought) and based on where they intersected outlined a chapter based on who’s circles intersected. Weird, I know—I get into weird OCD rabbit holes. Eventually the circles became the bases for the metamorphoses of the Vechey throughout their lives.
I’m also have to go with the flow. Alexander walked into my first book and changed everything. Eterili walked into this book and showed to me a multiverse. And it’s hers.

Can you give novice writers some tips (do’s/don’ts)?
You’ll love writing. Then you’ll hate it. Hold on until you love it again. Don’t worry when you hate it one more time. Just let it flow through you. Don’t fight it. Read. Absorb. Challenge yourself. Do tell the stories you want to hear.

What are your future plans as an author?
Now that I’ve found the rhythm that supports writing, I have a rough draft of a thriller to get into shape.

Last, but not least : Can you give my readers one teaser from your book, which is featured here on my blog, please?

Chapter 21 The Way

Eterili stood and waited. She kept the balance, tipping the scales this way and then that so the Vechey continued forward and maintained the timeline, harboring her secrets through eternity.
It was the way.
Her way.
The way she had designed over hundreds of thousands of years. Though she had been born many times, she remembered all of her lives. Many were short lived. She would return over and over into this world, this time, this universe, each time remembering her lives before. This current life was the one in which she had done most of her work, maintaining the timeline to be her way.
In this life, she had traveled the continents when they were nearly one mass. She and her siblings had emerged from her tribe as ones who experienced time differently than all others. When she had been born the nights were long. She realized from observing her siblings die painful deaths in their teens, she would be unable to walk in the day when she reached maturity.
The tribe cast her and her mother out. They retreated to a northern cave alone.
Eterili did not blame the tribe. They were limited in mind and understanding. Her mother did not understand what Eterili or her siblings were and died a Linear’s death in a cold, ice- covered cave.
The day Eterili discovered her ability to endure the sun was the day her Linear mother had died. They hid in the ice-cave as she became a teen and Eterili scavenged food for her mother during the evening. She watched her mother waste away, nothing more than a heap of bones and skin piled on a fur.
Eterili, when she was young, watched her older siblings become intolerant of the sun. One by one, they had grown weak and hid indoors from the daylight. They had not been as strong as her, had not spoken or become aware as early as her. They were Linears in Eterili’s eyes and she had learned from their mistakes. They were Linears with Vechey traits—that was all.
Before Eterili and her mother had found the ice-cave, all the siblings one by one had walked into the sun and died. At first, they had burned darkly. Their skin split. Her mother tried to sooth their pains. They spoke nonsense, as if to spirits around them. Eterili, who even at a young age, saw through time and knew there was nothing there. They had gone mad. She took their canines when they had died and created her anklet of teeth. From previous lives she knew who she was and how she needed to feed. Her siblings and mother were her primary food source, though they were none the wiser.
She sat in the cave alone, after her mother’s death and pondered what to do next. She had grown used to waiting. Eterili sat in the shadows of the cave watching the daylight outside. With a soft thump, a clump of snow and ice fell from the opening of the cave. This allowed the sun to penetrate the darkness and fall upon Eterili’s arm. She stared at it fascinated. Her traits and strengths varied from life to life, but this version of her life was unusual. Stronger.

Isn’t that a great reason to pick up this book and to find out more?!
Thanks once again for this lovely interview, Tina O’Hailey.

The Magic of Wor(l)ds

 

 

 

P.S. Are you an author (or publisher) who also wants a FREE interview like this? You can always contact me via e-mail!

Rags of Time – Michael Ward, an #Interview #QandA

– ‘The Magic of Wor(l)ds’ blog is a hobby, reviews and other bookish stuff on this site are done for free. –

blog-q&a

Today I’m not on a blogtour, but doing my own interview with Michael Ward, author of ‘Rags of Time’, to promote his book.
Before I let you read my Q&As, I’ll first post some ‘basic’ information.

About the Author :

91wh2cjA4HL._UY200_Mike Ward is an English creator of historical fiction. Born in Liverpool, he was a BBC journalist and journalism academic before turning to non-factual writing.
His debut novel ‘The Rags of Time’ is located in London in 1639. It marks the start of a tumultuous 40 years – civil war, regicide, republic and royal restoration. Politics, religion, commerce, science, medicine – none are left untouched by this ferment of change.
Mike believes it’s the perfect setting for his hero Thomas Tallant’s series of adventures, starting first with ‘Rags’. He is currently working on its sequel.

Synopsis :

9200000116590690London, 1639.
Spice merchant Thomas Tallant returns from India to find his city in turmoil – overcrowded, ravaged by crime and seething with sedition. A bitter struggle is brewing between King Charles I and Parliament as England slides into civil war.
A wealthy merchant is savagely killed; then his partner plunges to his death in the Tallant household. Suspicion falls on Tom, who soon finds himself being sucked into London’s turbulence. As he struggles to clear his name, he becomes entranced by the enigmatic Elizabeth Seymour, whose passion for astronomy and mathematics is matched only by her addiction to the gaming tables. Can her brilliance untangle the web of deceit that threatens to drag Tom under?
A thrilling murder mystery set in the murky streets of Stuart London, Rags of Time is an intriguing tale of murder, suspicion and the search for enlightenment that will keep you guessing until the final dramatic scene.

Amazon

Q&A :

Hi

First of all thank you very much for taking the time to answer my questions, I really appreciate it. Here we go! 🙂

Can you, for those who don’t know you already, tell something about yourself and how you became an author?
My professional life has always revolved around writing. First I was a journalist for newspapers and the BBC. Then I taught and researched journalism practice at university in the UK. Finally I started my own content creation company eight years ago which I still run. Throughout I always wanted to write fiction but didn’t feel ready until five years ago when I started researching what was to become my debut novel ‘Rags of Time’. I’m now working on the sequel.

Which books did/do you love to read as a child/now as a grown-up?
When I was young I would read adventure classics like Treasure Island but also CS Lewis’s Narnia fantasies. My taste nowadays is for historical fiction (one of the reasons I chose HF as the genre for my own books). Like many others, I have been bowled over by Hilary Mantel’s brilliant Thomas Cromwell trilogy. I also like CJ Sansom, Bernard Cornwell and Toby Clements.

Is there a writer whose brain you would love to pick for advice? Who would that be and why?
It would have to be Hilary Mantel. I’m quite dazzled by her technical achievement of creating a point of view for her principal character Cromwell that is both third and first person. It’s very intimate but also takes in the wider theatre of events which, of course, with Henry VIII centre stage, is essential to the narrative. I would love to learn how she created the technique.

If you could, which fictional character (from your own book(s) or someone else’s) would you like to invite for tea and why?
From ‘Rags of Time’, it would be Elizabeth Seymour. She’s such a polymath embracing astronomy, mathematics and medicine, who revels in the explosion of new ideas in the 1640s. I’d love to be able to share my 21st century layman’s knowledge of say, how the body works, and see her brown eyes widen in surprise. I’d just have to remember not to play cards with her. She’s an inveterate gambler!

Do you have some rituals or habits whilst writing?
No! It’s hard enough without being distracted by other stuff.

Where do you come up with your idea(s)? Do people in your life need to be worried? 😉
Writing historical fiction gives you a factual framework which, in itself, can provide ideas. For example, history is full of information gaps. Why did something happen? What was the real cause of an event? Providing possible (fictional) answers and solutions to these questions can be a great source of creativity.
The only worry for my family is whether they’ll ever see me while I’m in research mode. Researching ’Rags of Time’ took over a year.

Are you a plotter or do you go with the flow, as a pantser?
‘Rags’ is my first book and, though I started with a framework, I was surprised by how much the plot changed and was influenced by the growth of certain characters. I wouldn’t necessarily have believed it beforehand, but at times characters like Elizabeth came to life and took the lead, leaving me trailing in her wake, scribbling like mad!

Can you give novice writers some tips (do’s/don’ts)?
Well I may not be a novice writer, but I’m new to fiction so I think giving advice is a little premature. But with writing overall I would just say ‘get something down’. You can’t work without words in front of you and your first draft is just the start, not the end, of the story.

What are your futureplans as an author?
‘Rags’ is meant to be the first in a series featuring my main characters Elizabeth and spice merchant Tom Tallant. I chose the mid 17th century of the Stuart period because it is full of incidents unprecedented in England: civil war, regicide, republic and restoration. I also was fascinated by the relationship between England the Netherlands (United Provinces) in this period: sometimes trading partner, sometimes rival, and for many years at war. That’s why I have made the Tallant family Anglo-Dutch – plenty of opportunity to explore interesting dynamics in loyalty, especially coming just after the divisive politics of civil war. So there’s lots to write about, and keep me busy.

Last, but not least : Can you give my readers one teaser from your book, which is featured here on my blog, please?
The prologue of ‘Rags of Time’ features the violent and mysterious death of a London merchant that sets the whole plot moving and for which the answers are not found until the final chapters. But the seeds of the solution are planted in those first few pages.
So enjoy!

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Isn’t that a great reason to pick up this book and to find out more?!
Thanks once again for this lovely interview, Michael Ward.

The Magic of Wor(l)ds

 

 

 

P.S. Are you an author (or publisher) who also wants a FREE interview like this? You can always contact me via e-mail!

 

#BlogTour #DamppebblesBlogTours @damppebbles / #QandAs : Ground Rules #GroundRules – Richard Whittle @richard1whittle

– ‘The Magic of Wor(l)ds’ blog is a hobby, reviews and other bookish stuff on this site are done for free. –

Ground Rules banner V2

Today I’m on the ‘Ground Rules’ blogtour, organised by Damppebbles Blog Tour.
To promote this book I have a Q&As post, but before I let you read it first some ‘basic’ information.

About the Author :

Richard WhittleRichard has been a policeman, diesel engine tester, university student and engineering geologist. Writing as Alan Frost he was shortlisted from several hundred international competitors for the CWA (Crime Writers Association) Debut Dagger Award.

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Synopsis :

Ground RulesCalled out one night in the hope that she can identify the body of a man found in a field, Edinburgh forensic geologist Jessica Spargo – Jez – inadvertently becomes involved in the investigation of a university lecturer’s murder. The investigating officer, Tom Curtis, hands her a small glass vial and asks her to analyse its contents. She agrees to do it. The results confound everyone.
Media attention around a seemingly unconnected incident on a construction site near Edinburgh means that all work has stopped. An object discovered beneath the site confounds everyone, including the police. Employed by the firm’s owner to attempt to solve the mystery, Jez falls foul of an uncooperative site manager. Unruffled, she perseveres. Meanwhile, the murder mystery deepens. Despite her reluctance to become further involved, she has her own theories about the origin of the vial’s contents, theories the police do not accept.
To Jez’s dismay there are more deaths. As she says to Curtis, ‘I don’t do bodies. I’m a geologist, I look at rocks. If I’d wanted to look at bits of body then I would have become a surgeon or a pathologist.’

Purchase Links:
Amazon UK
Amazon US

Publishing Information:
Published in paperback and digital formats on 9th March 2020.

Q&A :

Hi

First of all thank you very much for taking the time to answer my questions, I really appreciate it. Here we go! 🙂

Can you, for those who don’t know you already, tell something about yourself and how you became an author?
I was around forty years old when I first sat down to write a full-length novel. I wrote it because I wanted to, not because I wanted it published. I don’t know what became of it. I do remember that I typed it on a portable typewriter!
I was a policeman in a big city for around ten years. My hobbies were geology, caving and rock-hunting, and what I really wanted to be was an engineer. I studied to enter university and eventually became an engineering geologist.
Around twenty years ago I entered one of my novels for the Crime Writers Association Debut Dagger Award and was shortlisted from a few hundred others. I didn’t win, but it encouraged me to keep writing.

Which books did/do you love to read as a child/now as a grown-up?
From an early age I was a public library member. Each time I visited I took out as many books as they allowed. I remember being given a copy of ‘Jennie’ by writer Paul Gallico, a novel that made me realise how powerful writing could be, and how it could raise such strong emotions. When I was older I started to read crime, mystery and adventure novels. For a while, because of my work, I tended to read (and write) a lot of technical and scientific stuff.

Is there a writer whose brain you would love to pick for advice? Who would that be and why?
I would like to chat with Kate Atkinson, to find out how she gets her head around such complicated plots. Also J. K. Rowling, to ask how she conjured up such stories – though I’m sure her answer would be “after many years of hard work.”

If you could, which fictional character (from your own book(s) or someone else’s) would you like to invite for tea and why?
It can’t really be from one of my own books, because I would know the answers to all the questions already. So let’s think about this… who would I invite for tea? I’m going to be boring here. Because I worked as an engineering geologist I’m going to say Marcus Attilius Primus, the aqueduct engineer in Robert Harris’s ‘Pompeii’, and ask him about the tunnels that took water to cities in ancient Italy. Not impressed? Okay. Then how about Hagrid? I did wonder about Severus Snape, but Hagrid would be much more fun.

Do you have some rituals or habits whilst writing?
Medium latte in a coffee shop. Comfy chair if possible (out of the sun, because if not, the sun’s either in my eyes or blanking out my laptop screen). Earplugs too, I don’t like using them, but I have to if a nearby customer talks too loudly. No earbuds or headphones with music, because I tend to listen to the music instead of writing. I manage to write intensely for two to three hours a day. I do not aim for a certain number of words, that’s for newspaper columnists and school essays. Instead I like to get things right. I can spend an hour on one page if I need to.

Where do you come up with your idea(s)? Do people in your life need to be worried? 😉
I base much of my work on personal experience. I was a policeman for ten years, then worked on the shop floor of an engineering firm. I became a mature uni student, then an engineering geologist. I worked in 20 countries, I have seen a lot of things (not always nice ones). Nobody in my life needs to be worried. I twist and turn the facts, the names and the dates. The personal experiences are only a trigger.

Are you a plotter or do you go with the flow, as a pantser?
A mix of the two. I like to think I’m a plotter, but really the plot is loose, I go with the flow and the plot comes in chunks – I plot the next bit. Only when I get around 2/3 way through do I start to develop an ending.

Can you give novice writers some tips (do’s/don’ts)?
Write what you love. It shouldn’t be a struggle. And write what you know about – or if you don’t know about it, research it thoroughly. Don’t beat yourself up if the words don’t come. Try writing something else. Sometimes I write two novels at once – I have about six half-done ones, but that’s from over thirty-or-so years! If I want to, I can pick them up later, or use bits of them.

What are your future plans as an author?
I just want to keep writing. I write because I love doing it, I find it relaxing, I can’t stop doing it. I suppose I write for myself but with the reader in mind. I see myself as a storyteller, so what I write must appeal to others. I will never make money from writing, that rarely happens.

Last, but not least: Can you give my readers one teaser from your book, which is featured here on my blog, please?
Forensic Geologist Jessica Spargo (Jez) is handed a container by Edinburgh Detective Chief Inspector Curtis. When he tells her what is in it, she says she can’t analyse it and doesn’t want it. Why is that? And why are its contents a key clue to the murder Curtis is investigating?

Isn’t that a great reason to pick up this book and to find out more?!
Thanks once again for this lovely interview, Richard Whittle.

The Magic of Wor(l)ds

dpbt 2

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

P.S. Are you an author (or publisher) who also wants a FREE interview like this? You can always contact me via e-mail!

 

 

#BlogTour #DamppebblesBlogTours @damppebbles / #QandAs : Paper Soldiers (DCI Priest #3) #PaperSoldiers #DCIPriest – Mark Pettinger @m_pettinger

– ‘The Magic of Wor(l)ds’ blog is a hobby, reviews and other bookish stuff on this site are done for free. –

Paper Soldiers banner

Today I’m on the ‘Paper Soldiers’ blogtour, organised by Damppebbles Blog Tour.
To promote this book I have a Q&As post, but before I let you read it first some ‘basic’ information.

About the Author :

Mark PettingerMark Pettinger is a crime fiction writer of the DCI Priest novels. His debut The Decalogue entered the Amazon Bestseller Top 100 list in December 2015, and the Top 10 on the sub-genre of ‘police procedurals’.
Mark was born in a maternity ward attached to RAF Manston in Kent. His father was in the Royal Air Force, and for the first few years of his life, he lived on a number of RAF bases on the east coast of the UK with his parents and sister. Skip forward a few years; now married and with children he lives in a small village in East Yorkshire.
Fitting his writing around his ‘day job’; Mark’s writing pattern is somewhat sporadic, and he writes when he can, which currently is in hotel rooms / foyer, or in an airport lounge trying to keep one eye on the departure board to ensure he doesn’t miss his flight!
Mark’s interest in the murky world of crime started a number of years ago when he was attracted to reading true crime. He became fascinated with the exploits of the Yorkshire Ripper, Dennis Nilsen, John Wayne Gacy, Andrei Chikatilo etc. An avid reader of many genre’s, but his attention turned to favouring crime fiction; and his reading list includes Ian Rankin, Mark Billingham, Lynda La Plante, Jo Nesbo, and latterly CJ Tudor (for something just that little bit special).
Mark has openly credited Ian Rankin as the primary inspiration for not only stirring his interest in reading crime fiction, but also ‘picking up the pen’.
Mark has published two hugely successful crime fiction novels: The Decalogue in 2012, and Tick Tock, Time’s Up in 2015. Long overdue, critics have noted, Mark published the third instalment in the DCI Priest series Paper Soldiers in March 2020.
Next on his list is a standalone crime thriller, due for publication in summer 2021.

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Synopsis :

Paper Soldiers ebook completeThe streets of Greater Manchester are awash with drugs and weapons, and the gangs that control this multi-million pound business will stop at nothing to protect and grow their business. The Dolsen family are one such gang.
When the head of a rival Yardie gang is found brutally murdered, revenge attacks were always likely to follow, and gang members were unlikely to be the only ones hurt.
DCI Priest teams up with the Serious Organised Crime Agency (SOCA); but they soon admit to conflicting objectives which may unravel their alliance, and prove to it be more of a hindrance than a help.
Was DCI Priest was about to undertake his most challenging investigation to date?

Purchase Links:
Amazon UK
Amazon US

Publishing Information:
Published in digital format by BookBaby on 16th March 2020.

Q&A :

Hi

First of all thank you very much for taking the time to answer my questions, I really appreciate it. Here we go! 🙂

Can you, for those who don’t know you already, tell something about yourself and how you became an author?
My name is Mark Pettinger and I live in a rural village in East Yorkshire, UK. I do have a ‘day job’ so I write whenever I have time, which is usually when I am away on business trips – hotel bar, airport lounge etc.
A number of years ago I was travelling long distances by car, and was struggling for time to read, so I came across audiobooks. During long journeys I would devour many crime fiction books, most notably the entire works of Ian Rankin. One day, travelling home, I thought ‘I can do this, I’ll give it a try’, and from there the journey began.

Which books did/do you love to read as a child/now as a grown-up?
As a child I was fascinated by all things ‘military’ and ‘war’. I read mainly non-fiction books, reading about various battles or wars fought over the centuries, and the soldiers that fought in those wars.
Now, as an adult, I tend to read crime fiction, which itself has many sub-genres. I enjoy police procedurals, psychological thrillers and the dark and creepy ones that you wouldn’t read alone in the dark.

Is there a writer whose brain you would love to pick for advice? Who would that be and why?
Despite having met him on a couple of occasions, a lengthy chat over a pint with Ian Rankin would be the one for me. The million dollar question would be ‘how do you keep coming up with storylines and maintain the longevity of a character over a long running series, such as Rebus?’

If you could, which fictional character (from your own book(s) or someone else’s) would you like to invite for tea and why?
It would definitely be Detective Sergeant Stephens (from my own DCI Priest series). The three books so far in the series have seen her relationship with Priest move from ‘having a fling’ to something more formal, to now living together. So many questions to ask about what it is like to live with DCI Priest? Does he ever switch off? Can she see herself in that lofty senior role in the near future?

Do you have some rituals or habits whilst writing?
Not really. As I noted earlier I do have a ‘day job’ so I need to fit my writing around that. As such, that doesn’t really allow for many rituals or habits – I just open up the laptop, read back the last 4 of 5 pages to get back into the story, and crack on!

Where do you come up with your idea(s)? Do people in your life need to be worried? 😉
You should see my internet browser history…no, really you should!
Crime fiction is probably the easiest and conversely the hardest genre to create ideas. The murky world of crime provides an abundance of opportunities, but the challenge is always to find a new angle. If you look at ‘ways to murder someone’ – it has all been done before, multiple times. The author needs to weave a number of sub plots and ensure that the characters are foremost in the storyline.

Are you a plotter or do you go with the flow, as a pantser?
100% a plotter. At the start of a new book I will spend a lot of time planning the end to end story. Don’t get me wrong, as I write the story may meander off somewhat but I’m OK with that if I’m happy with where it is going. I try and break the story up into 10-15 chunks (not yet chapters) and will add a dozen or so bullet points to each section to help me as I write.
Starting with a blank page without any planning would leave me with severe writers block.

Can you give novice writers some tips (do’s/don’ts)?
I know that it’s not original, but my best advice is simply: Stop talking about writing, and just write. You’ll gain more confidence as you write, and learn so much. None of which will happen if you don’t start.
My second tip, again nothing ground breaking, is: the first draft of anything is rubbish. The first draft simply gets the story out of your head and on paper, and by its very nature is the end of phase one, your ‘brain dump’. Don’t expect your first draft to be good. From there you can review and develop the story that you wanted to write.

What are your future plans as an author?
Having published book 3 in the DCI Priest series, I am currently writing a standalone crime novel which I expect will be published in summer 2021. After which I do expect to return to the DCI Priest series.

Last, but not least : Can you give my readers one teaser from your book, which is featured here on my blog, please?
A teaser……right! Well, both beta readers and early readers of the published book have all noted that the ‘torture scene’ will send you one way or the other (engrossed and lapping it up….or quickly turning the page) – let me know which one you are.

Isn’t that a great reason to pick up this book and to find out more?!
Thanks once again for this lovely interview, Mark Pettinger.

The Magic of Wor(l)ds

dpbt 2

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

P.S. Are you an author (or publisher) who also wants a FREE interview like this? You can always contact me via e-mail!