#BlogTour #BookOnTheBrightSide @BOTBSPublicity / #QandAs : Heartbreak in the Valleys – Francesca Capaldi @FCapaldiBurgess @HeraBooks

– ‘The Magic of Wor(l)ds’ blog is a hobby, reviews and other bookish stuff on this site are done for free. –

Heartbreak in the Valleys Banner

Today I’m on the ‘Heartbreak in the Valleys’ blogtour, organised by Book On The Bright Side.
To promote this book I have a Q&As post, but before I let you read it first some ‘basic’ information.

About the Author :

francesca-capaldiSeveral years ago, Francesca Capaldi pursued a childhood dream and joined a creative writing class. Lots of published short stories, a serial, and three pocket novels later, she’s now explored her mother’s ancestral history for a novel set in a Welsh colliery village. A history graduate and former teacher, she hails from the Sussex coast but now lives in Kent with her family and a cat called Lando Calrissian.

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Synopsis :

512yJVq51VLThe world was crumbling, but her love stayed strong
November 1915. For young housemaid, Anwen Rhys, life is hard in the Welsh mining village of Dorcalon, deep in the Rhymney Valley. She cares for her ill mother and beloved younger sister Sara, all while shielding them from her father’s drunken, violent temper. Anwen comforts herself with her love for childhood sweetheart, Idris Hughes, away fighting in the Great War.
Yet when Idris returns, he is a changed man; no longer the innocent boy she loved, he is harder, more distant, quickly breaking off their engagement. And when tragedy once again strikes her family, Anwen’s heart is completely broken.
But when an explosion at the pit brings unimaginable heartache to Dorcalon, Anwen and Idris put their feelings aside to unite their mining community.
In the midst of despair, can Anwen find hope again? And will she ever find the happiness she deserves?
A beautiful, emotional and heart-breaking saga set in the Welsh Valleys of the Great War that fans of Nadine Dorries, Rosie Goodwin and Sheila Newbury will love.

Amazon

Q&A :

Hi

First of all thank you very much for taking the time to answer my questions, I really appreciate it. Here we go! 🙂

Can you, for those who don’t know you already, tell something about yourself and how you became an author?
I’ve always wanted to be an author, from the time I was quite small. As an only child, I’d spend quite a lot of time creating worlds in my head and popluating them with characters, for whom I’d make up endless stories. Any ambititons I had to be a writer were put on hold for uni, teaching and bringing up a family. In 2006 when I discovered a creative writing class, run by Elaine Everest (who later became a well known saga author) I signed up. Soon I was being encouraged to send short stories to magazines, and that was the start of becoming a professional author.

Which books did/do you love to read as a child/now as a grown-up?
As a child I’d read anything and everything. I still have some of the Enid Blyton and Ladybird books on my shelves. In my late teens and twenties I discovered Catherine Cookson’s novels and read them all, along with the Brontës and George Eliot. Elizabeth Goudge’s ‘Herb of Grace’ (discovered in a charity shop many years ago), To Kill a Mockingbird (a school exam set book) and The Lord of the Rings are books I’ve read over and over. I also love books by Lisa Jewell and Freya North. And of course, I’m rather partial to sagas too. And crime. Quite a mixture really!

Is there a writer whose brain you would love to pick for advice? Who would that be and why?
Freya North, I think. Her novels are always full of fascinating characters, interesting settings and stories I can’t put down. I actually met Freya at a book event a few years back, though only to be a fan girl and tell her how much I enjoyed her books! She was lovely and I can imagine her being a good person to discuss writing matters with. I am lucky that I do actually have Elaine’s brain to pick, as we’re freinds and I still attend her classes.

If you could, which fictional character from someone else’s book would you like to invite for tea and why?
There are lots to choose from, but I might pick Atticus Finch from To Kill a Mockingbird. He was such a brave and honorable character, to challenge the ingrained prejudices of the time as he did. However, it would be interesting to find out (*spoiler alert ahead*!) why his attitude changed so much between that book and the long awaited follow-up, Go Set a Watchman!

Do you have some rituals or habits whilst writing?
I can’t say I do really! Unless lining up my notes and the research books around me before I start working is a habit. I suppose it is.

Where do you come up with your idea(s)? Do people in your life need to be worried? 😉
Some of my ideas come from real life. The seed for the main story in Heartbreak in the Valleys came from my great grandfather’s World War 1 military record. A serial I wrote for People’s Friend magazine was based on my parents’ romance in the 1950s. But much of what I write comes from snatches of overheard conversation, a news item or sometimes, seemingly, out of nowhere. I always carry a notebook with me, in case I’m inspired by something. As for people being worried, I once used someone who turned out not to be a good friend as a character, and made them a ‘baddy’ who got their comeuppance. It’s never seen the light of day, but was very cathartic.

Are you a plotter or do you go with the flow, as a pantser?
I used to be much more of a panster than I am now. It suited me to begin with, but now find plotting a story out, the twists and turns and consequences, makes for a lot less editing in the end.

Can you give novice writers some tips (do’s/don’ts)?
First of all, don’t expect your first effort to be published – or you second, third or fourth. I’ve known new writers dash off a novel and be convinced a publisher will snap it up. It rarely happens. Writing is a skill that needs to be practised, like anything else.
Don’t be afraid of or offended by critiques and try to learn something from them. If you have a piece rejected, look at why that might have been, rather than just assuming what you’ve written is rubbish, or that their opinion is wrong.
Do attend a class or writing group if possible. The advice, feedback and support can be invaluable.

What are your futureplans as an author?
I have the second ‘Valley’ book coming out in the autumn. I’m not sure yet if there’ll be a third: we’ll see. I also have the start of another saga series written, set on the Sussex coast. I’m hoping to write that at some point in the future.

Last, but not least : Can you give my readers one teaser from your book, which is featured here on my blog, please?

Anwen dragged herself across the garden with the bowl of potato peelings. She’d been in a despondent mood since her walk home, unable to shake off the feeling that the war would not end well for Idris. She reached the compost heap and emptied the potato peelings absent-mindedly onto it, observing the slope of Twyn Gobaith, where it rose up steeply beyond her garden, the grass a deep green from the recent rain. A sigh from deep within signalled her reluctance to return to the stifling house, despite the icy breeze.
She’d taken but two steps backwards when she was brought to a halt by the sight of a figure trudging over the brow of the hill. She squinted, shielding her eyes against the sun. The knapsack slung across his back gave the unusually tall carrier a pronounced stoop. It could only be a soldier on leave. Her heart raced. Normally a few of them came together from the Rhondda Pals, the battalion the young men here, in Dorcalon, had joined.
The figure stopped to lower his load, straightening his back and stretching. It couldn’t be, could it? No, it couldn’t be Idris; it was her vivid imagination, sparked by having him so much on her mind today.
A voice, just audible from where she stood, hollered from the scullery. ‘What the hell is it you’re doin’, girl!’ Her father. ‘Get in here now.’
She ignored the voice. It was Idris, her sweetheart, home on leave.

Isn’t that a great reason to pick up this book and to find out more?!
Thanks once again for this lovely interview, Francesca Capaldi.
Thank you very much for your interesting questions. They’ve certainly made me think!

The Magic of Wor(l)ds

 

 

 

P.S. Are you an author (or publisher) who also wants a FREE interview like this? You can always contact me via e-mail!

 

 

#BlogTour #BookOnTheBrightSide @BOTBSPublicity / #QandAs : Fair Means Or Foul – Keith Wright @keithwwright

– ‘The Magic of Wor(l)ds’ blog is a hobby, reviews and other bookish stuff on this site are done for free. –

Fair Means Or Foul (1)

Today I’m on the ‘Fair Means Or Foul’ blogtour, organised by Book On The Bright Side.
To promote this book I have a Q&As post, but before I let you read it first some ‘basic’ information.

About the Author :

kw-recent-photo-dec-2019Keith Wright is the Author of the crime novels in the ‘Inspector Stark series’ available on Amazon, Kindle and Kindle Unlimited|Audiobook on Audible and iTunes.

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Synopsis :

514vkmEPveLThe man sitting at the wheel of the car was 100 yards from his moment of destiny. He was oblivious to it, of course. Murderers don’t necessarily realise they are killers until a few seconds before it happens. Murderers are sometimes just like you and me. He would never have dreamed that such a thing might happen. Ridiculous. If anyone had told him that today was the day he would turn into a killer, he would have looked at them quizzically; questioning their sanity; instead of questioning his own.
The murder investigation into the death of a young girl at Nottingham’s Goose Fair throws up several suspects, close to home and further away. The stream of inquiries spirals into a climax, and suddenly another young life hangs in the balance.
Detective Inspector Stark and his team prepare to do anything to stop further bloodshed. They are willing to use any means necessary, whether it be fair means or foul.
In his fourth crime thriller, critically acclaimed author, Keith Wright, once again regales the stark reality of murder, derived from his hands-on experience as a CID detective sergeant working in an inner-city area.

Q&A :

Hi

First of all thank you very much for taking the time to answer my questions, I really appreciate it. Here we go! 🙂

Can you, for those who don’t know you already, tell something about yourself and how you became an author?
I am from a working class background and went to a comprehensive school before joining the police. When I retired from the force I went on to become Head of Corporate Investigations for a global retailer.
I still live in Nottingham with my partner Jackie.
I have four wonderful children, twins, Chris and Andy, who are also writers as well as being a teacher and another works for Cancer research. My son, Harry is at university and is an actor. Then there is the lovely chatterbox, Lily, who is 10 years old.
I began writing when in the police. I had always enjoyed reading crime stories, notably Ed McBain, and I thought I could combine real life experience as a Detective with good story telling.

Which books did/do you love to read as a child/now as a grown-up?
I enjoy autobiographies actually. I am interested in people and what makes us all tick and so I do enjoy reading a person’s life story. It doesn’t have to be someone famous, it can be anyone. As a young man, as I have mentioned, I read the fabulous American crime writer Ed McBain, from around the age of fifteen. Bizarrely I went on to meet him for dinner when I was speaking at the international mystery convention, which was a great honour for me. It was around 1994, I think. They say to never meet your heroes.

Is there a writer whose brain you would love to pick for advice? Who would that be and why?
I suppose it would have to be Charles Dickens. I love his work. Despite the victorian setting I think he was way ahead of his time, both with his characterisation, recklessness of style and lyrical prose.

If you could, which fictional character (from your own book(s) or someone else’s) would you like to invite for tea and why?
I would like to have tea with my main protagonist Detective Inspector David Stark. I would like to help him defeat his nemesis DI Lee Mole, and also give him some advice about his anxiety. He does not know what it is he is suffering from, but I want to help him. These things were not talked about as much in the 1980’s which is when my books are set.

Do you have some rituals or habits whilst writing?
I don’t go in for rituals as such. I am a very disciplined writer, I write pretty much all day every day. I guess I am used to the work ethic from my time in the police and private sector, which were quite hectic. I also enjoy it so much. I finally have the opportunity to devote myself to writing full time and I want to make the most of it and embrace it. I know this is a lucky situation to be in.

Where do you come up with your idea(s)? Do people in your life need to be worried? 😉
I tend to use my experience as a Detective Sergeant from back in the day for how things unfold. The ideas themselves however are from using my imagination. I can critically think and come up with ideas fairly easily. It is picking the right ones that can be the tricky bit.

Are you a plotter or do you go with the flow, as a pantser?
I have done both. I am going to have to say I am a ‘plantser,’ in other words a bit of both. I don’t want to write down huge skeletons any more, just key points, that I want to happen along with the theme and a little characterisation, for new characters.
This makes the process more enjoyable as I dont have a clue what is going to happen in the detail until the characters start involving themslves on the journey to the next junction.

Can you give novice writers some tips (do’s/don’ts)?
Do your own thing. Tell your own story. Be careful what advice you listen to, as most people know nothing, or if they do, it fits them not you. Keep it real. I share Stephen King’s advice to ‘show don’t tell,’ up to a point; while the bulk of the book should do this, sometimes you have to ‘tell’ to keep the pace right and avoid reader yawns.
Be adventurous, even reckless, if you can. Don’t be obsessed with too many writing ‘rules.’
Also make sure you write your ideas in your notes on your phone, if you don’t they will be gone forever, no matter how much you think you will remember them.
As for don’ts – Don’t write for anyone but yourself. (Some will disagree with this), if you are trying to write for others, who is it? Your neighbour? The postman? Be true to yourself. Not everyone is going to like your book. If you like it there is a chance that others will too and you can keep consistent and make the whole experience less arduous and more enjoyable.

What are your futureplans as an author?
I am in the process of completing a short story anthology I have compiled, which will go out later in the year. I am thrilled with it as it is a departure from my usual characters and contemporary. There is usually some sort of sting in the tale.
I have been working on my second Audio Book – ‘Trace and Eliminate.’ As with the first I have narrated it with my son Harry taking some parts and producing it for me. This will be out in the next two or three months, I would think.
I also have a little secret project I am undertaking.
And finally I will be starting my fifth book imminently.

Last, but not least : Can you give my readers one teaser from your book, which is featured here on my blog, please?
Thank you for the opportunity for us to chat about all things writing. I have thoroughly enjoyed it. I have selected the opening passage to ‘Fair Means Or Foul.’ I hope you like it and want to read on.

The man sitting at the wheel of the car was 100 yards from his moment of destiny. He was oblivious to it, of course. Murderers often don’t realise that becoming a killer is their fate until a few seconds before it happens. Murderers are sometimes just like you and me. We are not immune. There is no vaccine. He would never have dreamed that such a thing might happen. Ridiculous. If anyone had told him that today was the day he would turn into a killer, he would have looked at them quizzically; questioning their sanity; instead of questioning his own. His car was stuttering along in the grid-locked traffic. Stop. Start.
100 yards remained to the point of no return.
Nottingham’s Goose Fair, held the first weekend of October every year, hadn’t changed that much over the decades, it had just increased exponentially in size. Victorian children had slithered down the Helter-Skelter just the same as the squealing kids did now, in 1987, a hundred years later.
Thousands of people, young and old, streamed, from all directions, towards the beacon of bright lights and music. From a distance, they appeared hypnotically drawn to a pulsating Godhead, like a zombie apocalypse of shuffling, disengaged humanity, with only a Gregorian chant missing from the seemingly dystopian scene.
One of Nottingham’s oldest traditions, the Goose Fair, was more popular than ever, with a million visitors every year. A vast array of monstrous and exhilarating rides and ‘prize every time’ sideshows were the attractions nowadays, rather than a brace of geese and a cut of cheese, to temper Anglo Saxo hunger, such as it was when it first began. The living sea of humanity ebbed and flowed through the main thoroughfare, in a continuous wave, with tributaries of people filtering to various attractions, while attempting to avoid elbows to the body, spilled drinks, and stepped-upon toes.
This year, however, there would be a sinister visitor, a spectre at the feast. Death would lay its grim, heavy shadow over the festivities, as random and indiscriminate as ever. This was not the first time that murder had swung by the fairground, nor would it be the last, but it would be the saddest of them all.
90 yards.
The younger children, wide-eyed and agog, were lifted on and off the merry-go-rounds. At the same time, the teenagers queued at death-defying rides with appropriate names such as ‘The Paratrooper’ and the spinning cages of ‘Rock n Roll.’ The more adventurous fairgoer might head for the ‘Wall of Death’ where motorbikes would swirl around a caged wall at breakneck speed, and where occasionally people might indeed break their neck. Others would head towards ‘Ron Taylor’s Boxing Booth’. Boxing in various guises had been at the fair for two hundred years and had contributed to many fighters taking the sport up professionally. Here the local hard man could make the humbling discovery that he wasn’t as hard as he thought, or a delusional drunkard could embarrass himself for the jeering crowd’s entertainment.
Older visitors, stalwartly clutching their brandy snaps, were drawn nostalgically towards ‘The Cakewalk’ and would try to keep their feet, as the wooden floor jerked back and forth. Others headed for the more sedate, yet majestic galloping horses, of the ‘Carousel’.
80 yards.

Isn’t that a great reason to pick up this book and to find out more?!
Thanks once again for this lovely interview, Keith Wright.

The Magic of Wor(l)ds

 

 

 

P.S. Are you an author (or publisher) who also wants a FREE interview like this? You can always contact me via e-mail!

 

#BlogTour #BookOnTheBrightSide @BOTBSPublicity / #QandAs : Until the War is Over – Rosemary Goodacre @RoseGoodacre @HeraBooks

– ‘The Magic of Wor(l)ds’ blog is a hobby, reviews and other bookish stuff on this site are done for free. –

BLOG TOUR

Today I’m on the ‘Until the War is Over’ blogtour, organised by Book On The Bright Side.
To promote this book I have a Q&As post, but before I let you read it first some ‘basic’ information.

About the Author :

portrait-rosemary-goodacre-e1519299433716Rosemary Goodacre is thrilled to have a three book deal with Hera Books. Her World War I romance Until We Meet Again was published on 31/10/19.
Previously Rosemary has had a novella published, entitled A Fortnight is not Enough, and a science fiction story in the anthology Telescoping Time.
Rosemary has always loved languages and travel, mainly in Europe. In her spare time she enjoys country walking, bridge and classical music. She lives in Kent, England.

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Synopsis :

51PUsUUvxOLIn a world destroyed by war, can hope survive?
Summer 1918: Young couple Amy and Edmond Derwent, after their experiences on the front line of battle – Edmond as an officer and Amy as a VAD in France – have now settled back in England and are starting to build a life as a family, with the arrival of baby Beth bringing them much-needed joy. But while she may have married into the wealthy Derwent family, now living with her in-laws in their grand home, Amy’s modest upbringing means that she is never truly accepted by Edmond’s family.
The Great War rages on, and while the men are off fighting, those left at home steel themselves for tragic news, praying that their loved ones return safely.
Edmond, still struggling with the effects of the injury he sustained at Ypres, feels the guilt of remaining at home while his friends are sent into battle. But life at Larchbury is not without its own problems – as food becomes scarce, and the Spanish Influenza causes deaths throughout England, tragedy strikes closer to home and it seems no one is safe from heartbreak.
Can Amy and Edmond keep their love strong, even in a world crumbling all around them?

Amazon

Q&A :

Hi

First of all thank you very much for taking the time to answer my questions, I really appreciate it. Here we go! 🙂
Thank you very much for welcoming me to your blog.

Can you, for those who don’t know you already, tell something about yourself and how you became an author?
I have worked in the computer industry and teaching, besides raising a family. I have always loved writing. Around ten years ago I began trying seriously to get work published, and eventually started to have short stories published in magazines, and be placed in competitions.

Which books did/do you love to read as a child/now as a grown-up?
Perhaps my favourite classic as a girl was What Katy Did by Susan Coolidge. Katy meant to behave well but was always getting into scrapes. When her disobedience led to disaster she managed to overcome her problems.
Besides the classics, I’ve recently enjoyed reading The Time Traveller’s Wife by Audrey Niffenegger. The hero has an unexpected tendency to disappear to a different year, not always to his advantage, but the plot also works as a love story.

Is there a writer whose brain you would love to pick for advice? Who would that be and why?
I’d love to meet Margaret Atwood, who wrote The Handmaid’s Tale and The Testaments, because the world she conjures up, though dystopian, is so fascinating and you feel the events she describes could actually happen.

If you could, which fictional character (from your own book(s) or someone else’s) would you like to invite for tea and why?
It might be fun to entertain Zaphod Beeblebrox, the space hippy from The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy, by Douglas Adams, though he’d probably want to drink Pangalactic Gargleblasters.

Do you have some rituals or habits whilst writing?
I’ll probably go without shoes and wear something bright, to put me in a creative frame of mind.

Where do you come up with your idea(s)? Do people in your life need to be worried? 😉
I’d never portray anyone exactly as he or she is, though I might borrow a character trait. If you portray someone who has upset you, and you give the person a different name and appearance, he or she will not recognise the character, as people are seldom aware of their flaws.

Are you a plotter or do you go with the flow, as a pantser?
I find I need some idea of the plot before I start writing a novel. Otherwise it could amount to a lot of wasted writing!

Can you give novice writers some tips (do’s/don’ts)?
Personally I don’t like books which are written to some kind of formula, where the hero has to be a particular type, referred to as an alpha male. Other romance writers will disagree.
It’s important to get the dialogue right for the person and their background. If the book is historical you should try not to use anything which sounds too modern. It’s best to also do some research to find a suitable name for a person in the year he or she was born.

What are your future plans as an author?
The 1960’s are now far enough off to count as history and one day I’d like to write a book, or a series, about that era. It was a time when young people were challenging the conventions and there were lots of opportunities.

Last, but not least : Can you give my readers one teaser from your book, which is featured here on my blog, please?
Until the War is Over is set in 1918. Amy, my heroine, is married but her friends are still single. Florence is a school teacher and Lavinia a nurse, struggling to save lives in Flanders. As the men in their age group are being lost in battle, will the young women find husbands?

Isn’t that a great reason to pick up this book and to find out more?!
Thanks once again for this lovely interview, Rosemary Goodacre.
It’s been lovely visiting your site, thank you so much for having me as your guest.

The Magic of Wor(l)ds

 

 

 

P.S. Are you an author (or publisher) who also wants a FREE interview like this? You can always contact me via e-mail!

#BlogTour #BookOnTheBrightSide @BOTBSPublicity / #QandAs : Savage Gods #SavageGods – Peter Boland @PeterBoland19

– ‘The Magic of Wor(l)ds’ blog is a hobby, reviews and other bookish stuff on this site are done for free. –

Savage Gods

Today I’m on the ‘Savage Gods’ blogtour, organised by Book On The Bright Side.
To promote this book I have a Q&As post, but before I let you read it first some ‘basic’ information.

About the Author :

IMG_8740After studying to be an architect, Pete realised he wasn’t very good at it. He liked designing buildings he just couldn’t make them stand up, which is a bit of a handicap in an industry that likes to keep things upright. So he switched to advertising, writing ads for everything from cruise lines to zombie video games.
After becoming disillusioned with working in ad agencies, he switched to writing novels (or was it because he wanted to work at home in his pyjamas?). He soon realised there’s no magic formula. You just have to put one word in front of the other (and keep doing that for about a year). It also helps if you can resist the lure of surfing, playing Nintendo Switch with his son, watching America’s Next Top Model with his daughter and drinking beer in a garden chair.

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Synopsis :

41tCn2MAIMLHe only kills atheists.
Pray that God’s on your side.
A serial killer stalks the streets of London, murdering atheists in the most horrific ways. So far, it’s only the loud, outspoken ones who’ve been targeted. Specifically, a controversial group of intellectuals called The Four Pillars of Atheism. Attacking religion and angering believers, they’ve amassed enough hate mail and death threats to keep the police busy until hell freezes over.
DCI Roberts and her team have too many suspects and are drowning in leads. The pressure is on her to catch the killer before another horrific murder is committed. Not helped by the fact that London is in the grip of a sweltering heat wave. Desperate times call for desperate measures. DCI Roberts reaches out to John Savage and Tannaz to help her find the killer. Trouble is, Savage has his own personal demon to battle. Can he defeat one and catch the other?

Amazon

Q&A :

Hi

First of all thank you very much for taking the time to answer my questions, I really appreciate it. Here we go! 🙂
You’re very welcome. Thank you for having me.

Can you, for those who don’t know you already, tell something about yourself and how you became an author?
I trained as an architect but then switched to being an advertisng copywriter, coming up with creative ideas for companies like BT, Sony, RNLI and most notably Barbour, where I got the chance to write an ad featuring Raymond Briggs’ The Snowman. That was a real highlight, however, after that I got a bit disillusioned as many cleints just wanted to play it safe. It made the work dull and boring, so I switched to writing thrillers where I pretty much have free rein to do whatever I like. When I’m not writing, I’m obssessed with surfing, and hit the beach whenever I can, when my sore back allows me!

Which books did/do you love to read as a child/now as a grown-up?
I didn’t read that much when I was young, unfortunately, but the two books I loved the most as a kid were Stig of the Dump, and The Lion, The Witch and The Wardrobe – I still remember climbing in the back of my wardrobe and being extremely disappointed that it didn’t take me off to some magical land. Today, my favourite two books are All The Light We Cannot See, which is just the most beautiful book I’ve ever read, and Ken Follet’s The Pillars of the Earth, a big, hefty sweeping epic.

Is there a writer whose brain you would love to pick for advice? Who would that be and why?
Maybe the late Christopher Hitchens. I only discovered him after he passed away, but the guy is an intellectual giant, smart, clever and charming. I’d love to sit and talk with him, although I think I might be a liitle intimidated. My editor, Lauren Finger, worked on some of his books, and told me everyone was a little terrfied of him, although she also said he was incredibly funny. I mention him in my latest book.

If you could, which fictional character (from your own book(s) or someone else’s) would you like to invite for tea and why?
Dumbledore, so he could teach me some cool spells. I’m sure there’s one that would write a book for me, so I could go surfing more.

Do you have some rituals or habits whilst writing?
Tea, lots of it. Then more tea. Also I can’t write for long periods. I tend to write in little twenty minute spurts. Walk away from it, then more ideas pour into my head.

Where do you come up with your idea(s)? Do people in your life need to be worried? 😉
Being an ex-adman, coming up with ideas was my job, so they sort of pop into my head uninvited. The trick is sifting out the good ones from the bad ones.

Are you a plotter or do you go with the flow, as a pantser?
I used to be a pantser, but then discovered how much easier it is to write if you know where you’re going. Plus, you can still improvise the plot along the way.

Can you give novice writers some tips (do’s/don’ts)?
Don’t wait for inspiration. That only leads to procrastination. When I worked in advertising we were expected to write and come up with ideas five days a week, nine til late in the evening. If I’d said sorry, I’m not feeling inspired, I’d have got the sack. Just get on with it, whether you’re feeling fired up or not. Put one word in front of the other and keeping do that for a few months and you’ll have a novel.

What are your futureplans as an author?
I have a big commercial, crowd-pleasing thriller I’m working on next. Very dark, involving a lot of dead people, and the theme of being buried alive. It’s called The Book of the Buried, that’s the working title.

Last, but not least : Can you give my readers one teaser from your book, which is featured here on my blog, please?
There’s one hell of shock in this one.

Isn’t that a great reason to pick up this book and to find out more?!
Thanks once again for this lovely interview, Peter Boland.

The Magic of Wor(l)ds

 

 

 

P.S. Are you an author (or publisher) who also wants a FREE interview like this? You can always contact me via e-mail!

 

 

#BlogTour #BookOnTheBrightSide @BOTBSPublicity / #QandAs : The Grandpa Killer #TheGrandpaKiller – Dan Petrosini @JAZZYWINE

– ‘The Magic of Wor(l)ds’ blog is a hobby, reviews and other bookish stuff on this site are done for free. –

BLOG TOUR (1)

Today I’m on the ‘The Grandpa Killer’ blogtour, organised by Book On The Bright Side.
To promote this book I have a Q&As post, but before I let you read it first some ‘basic’ information.

About the Author :

dan blue wall chairDan has his own view of the world and culture, or lack thereof. He passionately believes people can realize their dreams if they focus and act, and he encourages just that.
His favorite saying is – ‘The price of discipline is always less than the cost of regret’
Dan also reminds people to get negativity out of their lives. He feels it is contagious and advises people to steer clear of negative people.
Married, and with two daughters and a needy Maltese, Dan lives in Southwest Florida. A New York native, Dan teaches at local colleges, writes novels, and plays tenor saxophone in several jazz bands. He also drinks way too much wine.
Dan has written over a fifteen novels and has an active blog.

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Synopsis :

TheGrandpaKiller_KINDLETwo eighty-year old victims…
…had roofies in their system.
Why would someone give the victims a date-rape drug?
Luca has heard the rumors and now there’s an official complaint. A high-end assisted-living community’s ownership has been accused of abuse. It seems like a straightforward matter to investigate, but is there something more sinister going on?
Is this about euthanasia or greed?
Luca thinks there may be a third option.
With a plate full of burglary investigations, one of which, led to the victims being pistol-whipped, Luca is swamped. Will he be able to unravel the clues and get to the truth?
His gut says there’s a connection…
…but who is behind it?
Is it only about a payday?
You’ll love this next installment in the Luca Mystery series, because of hard-nosed, relentless, detective work and his mind for unraveling the lies and deception.

Amazon

Q&A :

Hi

First of all thank you very much for taking the time to answer my questions, I really appreciate it. Here we go! 🙂

Can you, for those who don’t know you already, tell something about yourself and how you became an author?
I wrote my first story at the age of ten about a Martian visiting the US. I always enjoyed mysteries where it was unclear who did it and strive to write stories that are real but unpredictable.

Which books did/do you love to read as a child/now as a grown-up?
The Count of Monte Christo is my favorite of all time. As a kid I enjoyed the Old Man and the Sea and still do.

Is there a writer whose brain you would love to pick for advice? Who would that be and why?
I believe we can learn from everyone we meet. It would be interesting to chat with someone who had a huge debut or second book hit (and no nepotism involved!)

If you could, which fictional character (from your own book(s) or someone else’s) would you like to invite for tea and why?
In Third Chances, a serial killer with an extremely high IQ.

Do you have some rituals or habits whilst writing?
Nothing other than making sure I write each day. I move around locations and sometimes with music playing other time not – its my attempt to keep it fresh.

Where do you come up with your idea(s)? Do people in your life need to be worried? 😉
From life in general – the news, movies, books. For example, the idea for Am I the Killer? Came from a documentary about a brain injury that a snowboarder suffered in a fall. It was an emotional story that made me cry, A couple of days later I started wondering what if you had memory issues and were accused of murder….

Are you a plotter or do you go with the flow, as a pantser?
I take an idea and write some bullet points down and then dive in. I do keep a list of ‘open’ items and ideas to develope as I go along to avoid plot holes.

Can you give novice writers some tips (do’s/don’ts)?
It is important to comit to a schedule and write regulary. Whether you only have time once per week or month, doesn’t matter. Stick to your plan, the words add up.

What are your futureplans as an author?
I have a book nearing release. It should be out within a month and have already started on two others.

Last, but not least : Can you give my readers one teaser from your book, which is featured here on my blog, please?

It shouldn’t seem a surprise when someone in their eighties meets their maker, but when a string of otherwise healthy octogenarians made that meeting sooner than expected, I got an itchy feeling that somebody had a thing against grandpas.
Back in the office, I noticed the yellow Post-it with John Martin’s telephone number on it. I didn’t want to call him, but I had told Ronnie I would, and when I gave my word, it meant something.
A pet peeve of mine was people saying they were going to do this or that but never did. Most of the time it was harmless, but it reflected on the person and their reputation. Instead of declaring you’re going to do something that you probably won’t, just add a qualifier and you’re off the hook.
“John Martin?”
“Yes, who is this?”
“Detective Luca with the Collier Sheriff’s Office.”
“You’re Ronnie’s neighbor, right?”
“Yes. He asked me to speak with you about your concerns regarding Palm Shores.”
“They’re more than concerns. Something is going on there. Healthy people, like my dad and Ronnie’s, are dying just a couple of months after moving in there.”
“That is troubling, but I’d imagine there’s quite an adjustment moving into a facility like that.”
“Facility? It’s a country club for seniors, is what it is. My dad was happy there until they killed him.”
“What leads you to believe his death wasn’t natural?”
“Dad was in perfect health. He played tennis three days a week, for God’s sake. Then, all of a sudden, they say he passed during the night? You know, when it happened, we were stunned, but I just thought something inside him gave out. But then I get a call from this woman, Yolanda. Her mother died a couple of weeks before my father. She tells me her mother died a month after she went on Medicaid. She said she knows of at least two other cases like that.”
“I don’t understand the Medicaid reference. How is that relevant?”
“It’s all about the money. You see, Palm Shores wants you to pay out of your pocket; they call it private pay. When you run out of money, they can’t just kick you out. You go on Medicaid, but Medicaid pays like half what a private payer does.”
The financial gain to be had by eliminating residents the state paid for was an interesting angle. However, it implied a large conspiracy. Whoever owned the place would benefit, but they’d need a death squad to carry out the executions.
“I understand your concern about the reimbursement rate, but killing someone over a couple of thousand dollars a month would be a stretch.”
“Yeah? First off, it’s more like five thousand a month, but what about the money they get to keep for guys like my dad and Ronnie’s father? They take a huge haircut when they die.”
I recalled what Ronnie said: his dad opted for lower monthly fees, paying over three hundred thousand for an apartment that could only be sold back to Palm Shores for twenty-five percent less. Considering his health, it seemed like a good bet as he’d save two thousand a month. He needed to live three years to break even but died just two months later.
“I’ll look into this. Give me Yolanda’s contact information. I’d like to speak to her as well.”
After hanging up, I leaned back in my chair. This sounded crazy. The place where you’d go to be taken care of would kill you? Though I understood the financial gain side of such a scheme, it seemed incredibly difficult and dangerous to pull off.
Losing a loved one was emotional, and we needed someone to blame for the pain we felt. In this case, it appeared the bogeyman was a faceless institution.

Isn’t that a great reason to pick up this book and to find out more?!
Thanks once again for this lovely interview, Dan Petrosini.

The Magic of Wor(l)ds

 

 

 

P.S. Are you an author (or publisher) who also wants a FREE interview like this? You can always contact me via e-mail!

#BlogTour #BookOnTheBrightSide @BOTBSPublicity / #QandAs : The Bloodline Will – AB Morgan @AliMorgan2304

– ‘The Magic of Wor(l)ds’ blog is a hobby, reviews and other bookish stuff on this site are done for free. –

The Bloodline Will

Today I’m on the ‘The Bloodline Will’ blogtour, organised by Book On The Bright Side.
To promote this book I have a Q&As post, but before I let you read it first some ‘basic’ information.

About the Author :

a-b-morgan-Alison Morgan: A former mental health nurse, country bumpkin at heart, married to a hairy biker, fascinated by words, loves live music and she has an innate ability to make people smile and laugh.
Her crime thrillers have a strong cast of characters helping to define the style and pace of each story inspired by her life and career as a Psychiatric Nurse, and her fascination with the extremes of human behaviour.
AB Morgan is the critically acclaimed author of A Justifiable Madness, Divine Poison, The Camera Lies and Stench.

www.abmorgan.co.uk
Amazon A B Morgan Author page
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Synopsis :

4th Bloodline frontSometimes family trees have to die.
He made a mistake, and for the sake of his career investigative TV reporter Konrad Neale is forced to apologise, in person, to Ella Fitzwilliam.
Detained under section in a secure forensic unit, she doesn’t foresee a bright future. And she despises Konrad for exploiting her and exaggerating the truth about what she really did.
All in the name of journalism.
However, when he spots famous recluse Abigail Nithercott in the same mental health facility, he cannot resist the chance to scoop the next big story. But he must use Ella to uncover the dark secret of the Nithercott family.
Deceit is in their blood.
Thicker than water, it spills…

Q&A :

Hi

First of all thank you very much for taking the time to answer my questions, I really appreciate it. Here we go! 🙂

Can you, for those who don’t know you already, tell something about yourself and how you became an author?
I’m always amazed that I became an author at all. I gave nearly thirty years to the NHS, mostly at the frontline of mental health services, where I eventually became clinical manager for a countywide community service for people experiencing their first episode of psychosis. But when I developed an electrical fault with my heart, my beloved career ground to a halt and I needed to find something to challenge myself and stave off insanity. The irony of the situation was not lost on me…
Already in the middle of a proper midlife crisis, I’d passed my motorbike test aged fifty blah-blah and treated myself to a tattoo to match the rock-chick vibe and because my husband ‘The Bearded Wonder’ said I’d never go through with it (more fool him!). But being a full-time mental health professional, I was always too busy for creativity.
So, being gifted time to write a book was a bonus in one way, it landed in my menopausal lap as I waited for heart treatment at the brilliant Papworth Hospital and I jumped right on in. Yes! I could write a book. Couldn’t I?
About what?
As I was told you should ‘write what you know’, I set my debut novel in an acute psychiatric unit in the mid 1990’s. Familiar territory for me. The story came from three central ideas.
1. Jesus – what if he got stuck on a section? Nobody would believe he was the son of God, now would they.
2. The Rosenhan Experiment – worth a Google!
3. Dr Clive Tavis – www.paranoidschizophrenia.co.uk A man I know well, and for whom treatment for schizophrenia was considerably worse than anyone could imagine.
My first attempt at psychological suspense, ‘A Justifiable Madness’ will be three years old this year – now that IS mad. The opening scene involves a man, who looks remarkably like Jesus, naked and behaving bizarrely on a train station platform. But who is he really? And why is he intent on getting himself admitted to a psychiatric hospital?
I was very lucky and was picked up by Bloodhound Books who published my first four novels.

Which books did/do you love to read as a child/now as a grown-up?
I have a theory that I became a crime writer because of Beatrix Potter. My father would read to me as a child and when I listened to ‘Peter Rabbit’, I was enthralled. The suspense was fabulous. I distinctly recall holding my breath, willing Peter Rabbit to make it safely out of Mr McGregor’s garden. My word…
After that it was Enid Blyton: The Five Find-Outers whet my appetite for mysteries.
My adolescent years saw me dive into books by S E Hinton before reading Harold Robbins’ books under the bedcovers in a vain attempt to find out what sex was all about. The storylines were dreadful so I moved swiftly on to adventure with Wilbur Smith, Alistair Maclean and Dick Francis – from there to Stephen King. These days I have a number of favourite authors and quite often listen rather than read; C J Skuse, M W Craven, Mark Tilbury, Joy Ellis, etc, etc. and sometimes I venture into historical novels but I’m not a romantic and not into horror really.

Is there a writer whose brain you would love to pick for advice? Who would that be and why?
What a tricky question to answer. I think someone like Anthony Horowitz would be worth seeking advice from because, as a natural storyteller, he writes for screen as well as books. I recently read ‘Magpie Murders’ and was so impressed by his character Atticus Punt and I even listened to audio versions of his ‘Alex Rider’ series for young adults and more recently ‘The Word is Murder’ and ‘The Sentence is Death’. Brilliant stuff.
Mr Horowitz has an eye for detail and a brain for clever plots with ideas translated into great television ; ‘Midsomer Murders’, ‘Foyle’s War’, and ‘Poirot’, no less.
I’m very visual when I write, often seeing the scene in my head, but I sometimes struggle to describe what I see. I wonder what tips he could give me?

If you could, which fictional character (from your own book(s) or someone else’s) would you like to invite for tea and why?
Ha! Lovely question. Even though he’s a product of my own imagination, I would be delighted to have Konrad Neale sit at my dining table. He arrived in my head when I began to write ‘The Camera Lies’, and he’s been stuck there ever since. I quite fancy him. He’s a silver fox, a TV journalist with an enquiring mind and a ready wit – if somewhat irreverent, sexist and politically incorrect at times.
Knowing my luck, my husband would probably drag him off down the pub where they could drink beer together and shamelessly flirt with any passing woman worth a second glance.

Do you have some rituals or habits whilst writing?
Not rituals as such. I write in silence because I need to disappear inside my head and I can’t cope with too many interruptions other than next door’s chickens, the odd passing squirrel, and the birds twittering. I take a break to walk the dog, but sometimes – when I’m in the zone – I forget to drink or eat and only stop because my bum goes numb.

Where do you come up with your idea(s)? Do people in your life need to be worried? 😉
I’m never short of ideas, or for ways in which to bump people off. The thoughts may be triggered by a place, a word, a story on local news – pretty much anything.
My poor husband, ‘The Bearded Wonder’ lives in a permanent state of concern for his own safety. When I was researching for ‘Divine Poison’ I called upon my knowledge of medication side effects, but also researched further into poisons which were tricky to detect. ‘The Bearded Wonder’ likes his food but there were times when he doubted the wisdom of eating my delicious Chili Con Carne when I described how it could be made highly toxic. More recently I asked him to help me test the tensile strength of some coaxial cable I found in the shed…

Are you a plotter or do you go with the flow, as a pantser?
I really want to be a plotter, I’m just not one. I may have sketched out a plot, have a central idea, a rough picture in my head of what the story will look like, but then I start writing and as the characters develop so does the plot. Off I go and my brain takes me where it will. Sometimes I have to re-write whole sections to make a new idea work.

Can you give novice writers some tips (do’s/don’ts)?
The best top tip I can give is to read out loud what you’ve written. Record it and play it back or read it out to someone else. When you do this you will hear clumsy sentences, soggy or sloppy dialogue, all sorts of things that otherwise would pass by unnoticed. Be prepared to edit, edit, edit and make many revisions to your first draft. Don’t ask your family for feedback – they will be too kind. Find a fearless critic or pay an editor for a critique.

What are your futureplans as an author?
I know this sounds mad, but I’m teaching myself sound editing in order to record my own audiobooks and perhaps diversify into narration as another string to my bow. I have a manuscript sitting with an agent at the moment so you never know I may hit the big time… meanwhile another story is brewing nicely and any day now I shall begin the whole slog again. I love it!

Last, but not least : Can you give my readers one teaser from your book, which is featured here on my blog, please?
Here’s a little written teaser from chapter:

Ella indicated a chair. ‘May I sit?’
Konrad berated himself. In his haste to blurt out an apology he’d forgotten basic manners. ‘Of course. Would you like us to speak in private?’ he asked.
Having received approval from Ella, Konrad stared at Dr Yellnow, expecting her to take her leave, but she didn’t. ‘Dr Yellnow? Please, some time alone with Miss Fitzwilliam, if I may?’
‘If you insist,’ came the reluctant reply. ‘Should you need to attract a member of staff, please make use of the panic bar.’ The psychiatrist pointed to a metal strip around the walls. ‘Just hit it with the palm of your hand and someone will come running.’
Konrad saw Ella wheel her eyeballs in contempt. He didn’t speak again until the doctor closed the door and could be heard making her way along the echoing corridor.
‘So, how are you doing since we last met?’ Konrad asked. His voice quavered because at that moment an idea struck him. Ella could be his passport to the investigative journalists’ hall of fame. She could furnish him with all he needed to know about Abigail Nithercott. The media storm would be biblical. Martin Bashir’s interview with Michael Jackson would wither into insignificance compared to this magnificent offering.
Ella shot him a pitying glance. ‘There’ll be a nurse outside,’ she said. ‘Don’t be afraid, help is at hand. Besides, I’m not planning on battering you to death if that’s what you’re worried about.’
By coughing into his hand, Konrad bought some time to think. He wasn’t afraid of her, but this was a most unsettling scenario. No film crew at his side, no prepared script, no back up, and no witness to what he was about to say, but God was it exhilarating!
‘Look,’ he said, both hands splayed flat onto the table to give the impression he was being open. ‘I made a massive mistake and I need to find a way of rectifying that. I want to help you.’
Ella angled forward in her seat. ‘Better late than never, I suppose. What did you have in mind? A documentary about what it’s like to live in a psychiatric unit surrounded by mad women and psychopaths? What it’s like to know that when you have a mental illness no one ever believes you’re innocent even when proven innocent? Maybe you’d like to hear what it’s like being at the mercy of an incompetent consultant psychiatrist? How about that for starters?’
‘Is that what you want?’
Please, please, please be what you want, he thought, as sweat sucked his shirt into the small of his back.

Isn’t that a great reason to pick up this book and to find out more?!
Thanks once again for this lovely interview, AB Morgan.

The Magic of Wor(l)ds

 

#CoverReveal #BookOnTheBrightSide @BOTBSPublicity : Rabette Run #RabetteRun – Nick Rippington @nickripp

– ‘The Magic of Wor(l)ds’ blog is a hobby, reviews and other bookish stuff on this site are done for free. –

Today I’m super pleased to be on the blogtour, organised by Book On The Bright Side, to reveal the cover of

Rabette Run
by
Nick Rippington

But first some information.

About the Author :

20160101_122509NICK RIPPINGTON is the award-winning author of the Boxer Boys series of gangland crime thrillers.
Based in London, UK, Nick was the last-ever Welsh Sports Editor of the now defunct News of The World, writing his debut release Crossing The Whitewash after being made redundant with just two days notice after Rupert Murdoch closed down Europe’s biggest-selling tabloid in 2011.
On holiday at the time, Nick was never allowed back in the building, investigators sealing off the area with crime scene tape and seizing his computer as they investigated the phone-hacking scandal, something which took place a decade before Nick joined the paper. His greatest fear, however, was that cops would uncover the secrets to his Fantasy Football selections.
Handed the contents of his desk in a black bin bag in a murky car park, deep throat style, Nick was at a crossroads – married just two years earlier and with a wife and 9-month-old baby to support.
With self-publishing booming, he hit on an idea for a UK gangland thriller taking place against the backdrop of the Rugby World Cup and in 2015 produced Crossing The Whitewash, which received an honourable mention in the genre category of the Writers’ Digest self-published eBook awards. Judges described it as “evocative, unique, unfailingly precise and often humorous”.
Follow-up novel Spark Out, a prequel set at the time of Margaret Thatcher and the Falklands War, received a Chill With A Book reader award and an IndieBRAG medallion from the prestigious website dedicated to Independent publishers and writers throughout the world. The novel was also awarded best cover of 2017 with Chill With A Book.
The third book in the Boxer Boys series Dying Seconds, a sequel to Crossing The Whitewash, was released in December 2018 and went to the top of the Amazon Contemporary Urban Fiction free charts during a giveaway period of five days. A digital box set, the Boxer Boys Collection, came out in September last year.
Now Nick, 60, is switching direction feeling that, for the moment, the Boxer Boys series has run its course. His latest novel, Rabette Run, will be released in the Spring and Nick says, ‘It is a gritty psychological thriller with twists and turns galore. Think Alice in Wonderland with tanks and guns.’
Married to Liz, When Nick isn’t writing he works as a back bench designer of sports pages on the Daily Star. He has two children – Jemma, 37, and Olivia, 9.

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Synopsis :

EMERSON RABETTE has a phobia about travelling on underground trains, so when he is involved in a car accident his worst nightmare is about to come true.
A middle-aged graphic designer and father of one, Emerson’s entire future depends on him reaching an important business meeting. Without an alternative method of transport, he has to confront his biggest fear.
Things immediately go wrong when Emerson’s Obsessive Compulsive Disorder kicks in and his fellow passengers become angry at the way he is acting. Thankfully a young woman called Winter comes to his rescue and agrees to help him reach his destination.
Once on the train, she thinks her job is done. But Emerson can’t help feeling he is being watched by his fellow passengers, including a soldier, a woman in a hat covered with artificial fruit and a man with a purple goatee beard.
Is it just his paranoid kicking in, or are they all out to get him?
And Winter is taken totally by surprise when Emerson takes flight after reading a message scrawled on the train’s interior.
It simply reads: ‘Run Rabette Run’.

Excerpt :

PROLOGUE

HE was sneaking a glance at his daughter in the rear-view mirror, listening to her talk about college and friends, when their blue family estate was broadsided by the Jeep.
Time suspended before a tsunami of shattered glass crashed in and he lost control of the steering wheel. The airbag deployed and the seat belt cut painfully into his shoulder as it absorbed the strain of his 15-stone bulk before boomeranging him back into place. What was left of the windscreen retreated as his body reacted like the lash of a whip and, in his confusion, he experienced that eureka moment… ‘Ahhh, whiplash!’
As the car skidded across the road he was dazzled by a kaleidoscope of bright lights – neon advertising boards, shop windows and street lamps. When his eyes adjusted it was as if he was watching everything in slow motion: A couple he had noticed walking hand in hand moments earlier ran in different directions, while a newspaper seller deserted his pitch, money pouch flapping against his pounding legs. Further along, a dapper-looking bloke in tweeds seemed in two minds which way to flee before settling on the safety of the Underground steps.
The visions tumbled from his mind as the car completed its 360-degree spin and he finally locked eyes on his assailant. Marooned in the stationary Jeep, the dark-haired woman stared through the windscreen vacantly, a thick stream of blood meandering down her face from a garish wound above her eyebrow. Devoid of expression, it seemed the shock had vacuumed all thought from her brain.
As soon as she appeared, she was gone, the car continuing to spin. Facing the pavement again, the driver’s attention was captured by what he thought was a bundle of blankets and rags in a shop doorway. With alarm he noticed startled eyes staring out from a face swamped in facial hair. ‘Get out of the fucking way!’ the driver mouthed as he realised one of London’s street dwellers was totally oblivious to the approaching danger.
The car made jarring contact with the kerb and suddenly it was the driver who was spinning, like a sock in a washing machine. His head bumped against the ceiling, his left arm smashed against the twisted metal of the door and his right leg sent jolts of electrifying pain through his nervous system.
Finally, the fairground ride from hell came to an abrupt halt, the car thudding against something hard. The heap of tangled metal that was once a solid and protective shell settled slowly back in an upright position, bouncing like one of those gangster rides with hydraulic suspension that featured in American movies. This wasn’t America, though, this was twenty-first century Britain and he wasn’t a teen gangster, just an ordinary Joe going about his boring, routine business.
New sounds invaded the void left by the disintegrated windows: horns blowing, tyres screeching, glass crunching, people screaming. His ears slowly acclimatising to the noise, he then detected an unfamiliar ticking and saw steam pouring from the bent and buckled bonnet. Performing calculations in his head, he tried to work out how much this entire calamity might cost him. What would the insurance company say? Was there any possibility the vehicle wasn’t a write-off and did his policy contain the use of a courtesy car? How the hell was he going to get to work? What the hell was he going to tell his wife?
Shit, his daughter!
‘You OK back there, honey?’
There was a pause during which his heart skipped a beat.
Then…
‘Yeah, I think so. I’ve a… pain in my tummy.’
Superficial damage. Nothing serious. Thank God. Relief flooded through him.
‘You?’ she asked.
‘My leg’s killing me but otherwise…’
His thoughts were interrupted by another sound. Looking to his left, he was surprised to see the passenger window still intact. Outside, a man in a navy-blue uniform and cap gesticulated wildly, but it was hard to make out what he was saying. The driver felt as if his head was submerged in that slime kids found all the rage.
Still, at least he was conscious enough to interpret the police officer’s manic, hand-waving gestures and detect the urgency in them. Shaking his head to free himself from the gloop, he felt needles of pain attack his nervous system as he shifted sideways, utilising every muscle necessary to reach out and press the button which released the window.
The car’s electrics made an uncomfortable, whirring sound as the glass slid down a few centimetres then stopped. Jammed. He continued pushing the button, but the internal workings were badly damaged. He watched as a gloved hand slipped through the gap at the top of the door and exerted pressure. There was another crunching noise and the window dropped to around halfway, the brute force almost certainly rendering the mechanism irreparable. Not thinking straight, his first reaction was one of anger and his mind made calculations about how much compensation he should claim once he was back on his feet.
The police constable battled gamely to get his point across amid a deafening ensemble of alarm bells and sirens. ‘We need to get you out of there, sir. No need to panic, but we have to make you safe before we can get the paramedics to check you over.’
‘Sounds serious, Dad,’ said his girl.
‘Thanks, Sherlock, always the optimist.’
‘What was that?’ The officer’s face seemed blurred as the driver tried to focus.
‘Sorry, it’s my ears…’ he shouted, the frenzied effort to make himself heard betraying his underlying fear. ‘I can’t… Is the car going to explode?’
‘Umm, I sincerely hope not, sir, but there is a lot of fuel around, the engine’s smoking… It’s best to err on the side of caution. We need to get you a safe distance away in the unlikely event that things escalate. The fire brigade will be here in two ticks and they’ll bring it under control in no time. Until then…’
‘Not sure I can move to be honest, son. I think my leg’s trapped.’
‘Ahhh.’ The policeman nodded. ‘Can you have a look around – see what the problem is? You might be able to free it. On second thoughts, hold on, I’ll come around to your side and see what I can do.’
Appearing at the driver’s window, he then brushed aside fragments of glass and leaned through, peering into the gloom of the footwell. ‘O… K,’ he said slowly. He wasn’t very good at disguising his feelings. It was serious. ‘We have a bit of a problem. A lump of metal appears to have wedged itself in your leg. I’m guessing it will take special tools to get you out of there.’
Shit! The Jaws of Life. Only the other day he had been watching a TV programme about the fire service and the equipment they used to cut people free from road traffic accident wrecks. The jaws had saved many lives, but the name alone was enough to send a shudder rippling through his damaged body. The sirens in the distance were getting louder as they announced their urgency to the world. Blue spinning lights roamed the darkness of the car’s interior, before a more permanent red glow encroached on the shadows. Was it getting hot?
‘Ahhh…’ said the officer.
There were snapping sounds followed by a crackle. Random memories of an old advert for cereal entered the driver’s head: snap, crackle, pop. Twisting as best he could, the driver realised the noise was being created by flames eating into the car’s paintwork. ‘No!’ he muttered through clenched teeth. Damn, he’d just forked out a small fortune on a touch-up job after some local punk had dug a thick groove right along the passenger’s side with a coin or a key.
‘Uh oh!’ said his daughter, looking over her shoulder. ‘They’re going to get us out of here, aren’t they, Dad? I’m scared.’
‘Stay calm,’ he replied, wishing he could practice what he was preaching. ‘I’m sure it will be fine. The fire brigade is on their way and will be here shortly.’
‘Ahh, they’re here,’ the policeman announced on cue, relief evident in his tone.
Moments later the driver heard a new voice, the accent pure Cockney. ‘Stay calm, sir, and we’ll have you out in no time.’
The driver twisted in the direction of the person speaking and another wave of pain rolled through him. On the periphery of his vision he could make out a tall man with a pointed jaw in a fire brigade uniform.
‘What seems to be the trouble, eh? Let the dog see the rabbit.’ The fireman leaned inside. ‘Rrrr…igh…t,’ he said before shouting some instructions to the rest of his crew.
Suddenly, the car was plunged into darkness. The driver guessed it was being buried in that foam the fire services used to bring a blaze under control. It felt strangely comforting to know they weren’t going to be burnt alive. Another sound, a screeching, grating noise soon invaded the car’s interior, setting his teeth on edge.
‘Cool!’ muttered his daughter as sparks sprayed through the roof. Moments later the metal was peeled back like the lid on a tin of tuna, bright lights invading the space, making them cry out and shield their eyes.
‘Sorry, mate, it’s got to be done,’ advised the fire officer. ‘Once we’re inside, we can hopefully remove the obstacle that’s holding you in place and get you out of there. Second thoughts, the best thing we can do, looking at it now, would be to remove the door, together with your good self. It should be easier to cut you free elsewhere, rather than in the midst of this, um, chaos. When we get somewhere a bit less volatile the medical people can assess the problem and hopefully free your leg from the door.’
As he said this, for the first time the driver realised that up until now the darkness of the footwell had prevented him taking a closer look at his injury. Shielding his eyes from the glare, he glanced downwards. A thick metal shard was protruding from his leg and a dark, sticky substance soaked his trousers. The limb looked like a theatrical prosthesis in a zombie apocalypse movie, the foot at a right angle to the rest of the limb.
He experienced an unfamiliar dizziness and passed out.
GLOVED hands grasped the limp body and gently carried it to the stretcher. The patient felt a needle entering the soft tissue in his arm and after that remembered little, sliding into unconsciousness as he murmured her name. The paramedic whispered to one of the fireman.
‘What did he say? Sounded like a name? Jane, was it? I think he said something about a daughter. Was there anyone with him?’
‘Nope,’ replied the fireman. ‘He was all on his lonesome.’
A colleague arrived at the paramedic’s shoulder. ‘Right, best get him to intensive care, lickety spit,’ said the new arrival. ‘I hate to be the prophet of doom, but it will be touch and go if he survives the night.’

After this great teaser I hope you are still excited for the cover reveal, because this is happening

right now!

Rabette Run Cover MEDIUM WEB

Did this all pique your interest in reading the book? It will be released soon, but it’s already available for pre-order at Amazon UK and Amazon US.

The Magic of Wor(l)ds

#BlogTour #BookOnTheBrightSide @BOTBSPublicity / #QandAs : Addressed To Kill – Keith Wright @KeithWWright

– ‘The Magic of Wor(l)ds’ blog is a hobby, reviews and other bookish stuff on this site are done for free. –

BLOG TOUR (6)

Today I’m on the ‘Addressed To Kill’ blogtour, organised by Book On The Bright Side.
To promote this book I have a Q&As post, but before I let you read it first some ‘basic’ information.

About the Author :

KW RECENT PHOTO DEC 2019Keith is re-mastering his murder/mystery novels, first published in the early 1990’s and set in the late 1980’s; introducing new characters and additional scenes and has decided to open them up to a new readership on Kindle, Kindle Unlimited and Paperback available on Amazon. It is remarkable how much life has changed in the last thirty years and the novels are now period pieces and an insight into what life (and death) was really like before mobile phones and the internet!
Keith was brought up on a council estate in a rough area of Nottingham and attended the local comprehensive school. His father was an alcoholic and left when he was ten. His mother; Marie, brought him, and his four siblings up on her own, whilst balancing a full-time job. His mother loved reading and he too became interested. His mother would usually be later home from work than school finishing time, so he would call into the local library on his walk home. Whilst at the time this seemed inconvenient, (although it was a good place to get warm and dry in winter), it was, of course a blessing, as it enabled him to evolve his own love of books.
After being told by his careers officer at school that he had no chance whatsoever of getting into the police force, he decided to try himself, and wandered into the local police station at the age of fifteen to enquire what he must do. By some fluke he managed to pass the entrance exam and interviews and he was accepted into the police force. He worked the area where he had grown up, and this meant that everyone knew him, and so he was trusted, and was able to understand what was going on in the area. He also, occasionally had to arrest some of his old school friends for various crimes. It was always good to catch up with these mini- re-unions!
Keith spent 25 years in the police service retiring in 2005 as a Detective Sergeant. He then began working for a global business, leading investigations and up until recently Headed the Serious and Corporate Investigations Team dealing with bribery and blackmail within the corporate world.
He still lives in Nottingham and is engaged to Jackie. He has four wonderful children, twins, Chris and Andy, and Andy’s. fiancée Katie, who is an operatic singer. Chris and Andy are also writers and have done some amazing bodies of work. His son, Harry is at university, doing a degree in Computer Science but has discovered a love of acting and has performed in various productions. ‘Follow your heart, son’. Then there is the lovely chatterbox, Lily, who is 9 years old and without knowing inspires Keith to keep on going. There is a lot of creativity in the Wright family!
Keith has a great relationship with Jackie’s grown up children, Aron and his partner Ayla, Ashley and his wife, April, and Callum. With all the family interaction it is a wonder any writing gets done at all!
Keith’s novels are set in the 1980’s and involve the investigations of DI Stark and his team of detectives in Nottingham CID. It is no coincidence that the author was a Detective in Nottinghamshire CID in the 1980’s!
Keith ‘For his sins’ (obligatory comment) is a lifelong supporter of Nottingham Forest Football Club and played for the youth team with Steve Hodge, when Brian Clough was manager and League and European Champions.
His books, first published in the early 1990’s as contemporary fiction, achieved critical acclaim and his first novel One Oblique One was shortlisted for the Crime Writers Association John Creasy Award for the best debut crime novel of the year in 1991. This was the first year that the award was opened up to global competition and Keith was pipped to the award by the fabulous Walter Moseley’s ‘Devil in a Blue Dress’.
Keith was asked to contribute to a short story anthology for the Crime Writers Association called Perfectly Criminal published by Seven House, among such luminaries as Ian Rankin, Val McDermid and HRF Keating. He wrote ‘The Missing Link’ for inclusion in the book. He was also asked to contribute to a short story anthology called City of Crime published by Five Leaves Publications, alongside great authors, Alan Sillitoe, John Harvey and David Belbin. Keith’s contribution was ‘From the Cradle’.

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Synopsis :

COVER FOR ADDRESSED TO KILL FINALChristmas is Murder!
It is 1987. A perverted criminal sociopath is on the loose. An innocent young woman is murdered in horrific circumstances.
DI Stark announces, ‘Christmas is cancelled,’ and his team investigate; aware that every second the maniac is on the loose, moves him closer to his next victim.
A second woman is raped and brutalised.
How is the killer discovering intimate secrets about his victims? Why does he insist on terrifying them on the lead up to the attacks? What is driving this depravity? Who will the next victim be?
In his attempts to protect the public, DI Stark makes a huge error of judgement, which will have appalling consequences.
Critically acclaimed author, Keith Wright is a former CID Detective. His professional knowledge of police investigations, coupled with a formidable talent for storytelling, combine to make his third novel a must for all crime fiction enthusiasts and thriller readers alike.

ATK Promo Board

Q&A :

Hi

First of all thank you very much for taking the time to answer my questions, I really appreciate it. Here we go! 🙂

Can you, for those who don’t know you already, tell something about yourself and how you became an author?
My proudest moment thus far as a writer was being shortlisted in the final three for the Best debut Crime Novel of the year by The Crime Writers Association. This was the first year it was not confined just to the UK. (Just my luck). It was won by Walter Moseley for ‘Devil In a Blue Dress’ but to be shortlisted for such a prestigious award was mindblowing for me.
I used to be a Detective, with responsibility for the most crime ridden area in the UK at the time, during the 80’s, 90’s and early 2000’s. I dealt with everything from house burglary, to stranger rape, to murder.
I began writing when I was 26 years old. It was something that I had always fancied doing and so I literally just started writing into the small hours of the night. I enjoyed it, it was quite cathartic, and I actually thought it might be quite good. After handwriting the manuscript I hired an electronic typewriter, (I was that broke, with twins on the way!) and typed out the original manuscript which I called ‘The Marriott Murders – A Detective’s Casebook’. This was to become my first book ‘One Oblique One’ – which is the radio police code-word for sudden death. I still have both the handwritten MS and the typed one.

 

Which books did/do you love to read as a child/now as a grown-up?
I started reading for fun when I was about fourteen years old. My Mum inexplicably had numerous books written by a guy called Ed McBain. Older readers and crime fiction fans will know him. I started reading ‘Cop Killer’ and became hooked. I read them all. I couldn’t get enough of them. The world is strange, I was on the headline panel at The World Mystery Convention called Bouchercon and Ed McBain was also there and a handful of us went to dinner with him. How weird is that?
As a grown up, I like Peter Robinson’s books and Ian Rankin crime novels, who I know from those days. I also love reading any autobiography, or historical book. I guess I am interested in people and the human condition. That has never left me from my detective days.

Is there a writer whose brain you would love to pick for advice? Who would that be and why?
I have been compared in reviews to Raymond Chandler, rather kindly. He was a world famous writer of Noir back in the day. I would be interested in how he constructed the characters and what parameters there were for him, if any.
Also, perhaps strangley, I would love to have dinner with Charles Dickens. I admire his boldness in creating words, his social commentary of the Victorian Times and his clear passion for improving life in those days, by reflecting its depravity in his writing.

If you could, which fictional character (from your own book(s) or someone else’s) would you like to invite for tea and why?
In my book Addressed To Kill, there is a character called Cynthia Walker, she is a mixed race female detective in the 1980’s. Times were so different back then and she is a pioneer at a time of change, and yet her youth can make her vulnerable to nasty people in the outside world, but also within the police. I would love to meet her and listen to her struggle and also to tell her that things are going to change, at least to some extent, in the future.

Do you have some rituals or habits whilst writing?
I always write with my eyes open. Joking aside, I tend to keep writing no matter what. By that I mean, I don’t tend to get writers block, because I will just plough on regardless, even if I know I am writing rubbish and will have to return to heavily edit or destroy the piece. No writing is wasted because it is always a step in the process, helping you get to the place you wish to be. There are no short cuts, in my view.
I never count words. It is the content that matters. Once I am at the end and starting to think about editing I will make sure I am within the perameters for crime; but I am fortunate that I usually am there or there abouts even after editing, and ripping some bits to shreds.

Where do you come up with your idea(s)? Do people in your life need to be worried? 😉
Ha! I have told my partner not to worry when reading ‘Addressed To Kill’ as I am inside a psychopathic rapist and killers mind, in some detail. You will be pleased to hear that I am not a psychopathic rapist and killer, but I have met some psychopaths and many, rapists, and killers. I know their M.O. and through interviewing them and seeing them away from that process, seeing how they operate and their thought processes.
My ideas come from my experience as a detective, as do the characters. Some are composite characters of people I have met. Plot ideas tend to be creating a scenario for the detectives to deal with and it makes its own way from there.

Are you a plotter or do you go with the flow, as a pantser?
I am going to say pantster. My first book was written that way, but when I got an agent he recommended a skeleton and then a scene by scene breakdown ahead of writing proper. I did that for my second book ‘Trace and Eliminate’. I like to think that the end results are pretty similar. I think it is easier as a plotter, particularly if you are not full-time, as you can go back to the book and immediately get into it. It is also good for keeping a tag on character arcs, and even lesser characters descriptions. I understand there is software you can buy to do this. It is very complicated to write a book, much more so than people realise. I am glad I am a full-time writer now.
I am so familiar with my characters, that ‘seat of pants’ is much more enjoyable, as the characters, and your imagination always surprise you, and it’s great when people ask you what it is about and you can say ‘I don’t know, yet.’

Can you give novice writers some tips (do’s/don’ts)?
Some people will like your book, and some will not. You will get rejections, but you must not be deterred by this, or think that they must be right. The people rejecting you are not world famous writers, and anyway fuck ‘em.
Own your book, people will try to mould it how they think fit, but its yours, truly yours, so treasure it. That does not mean ignore good advice, of course, but you decide what is good advice and what isn’t; which I think is important.
Steven King’s advice to ‘show not tell’ is excellent, but you musn’t sacrifice pace to achieve this.
Read it outloud (not just in your head) to get the dialogue and tempo of the words right, as you might for an audio book. I found this helpful in getting the flow right.

What are your futureplans as an author?
I am currently working on the narration of ‘One Oblique One’ for Audible, which is a thrill but hard work. It is a treat because my son, Harry, who is an actor, is playing some of the roles for me, so that is fun. It should be out by the new year at the very latest, hopefully, before.
I shall be releasing my fourth book ‘Fair Means Or Foul’ next year, as well as catching up with Audible books, but this does take a bit of time. I am also intending to release a book of short stories at some stage. I keep writing them in hiatus, and I have 6 or 7 that I really like so far, and there will be more to come. Some can be seen on my website: keithwrightauthor.co.uk. After that I shall be writing a brand new book. I have a few ideas knocking around my head, yet to be revealed!

Last, but not least : Can you give my readers one teaser from your book, which is featured here on my blog, please?
DI Stark and his team are hunting for a serial rapist and killer. He has struck twice already. They know he will strike again. That is a given, unless, they can catch him first. DI Stark in his enthusiasm to catch him makes a huge error. This is an error that will impact the Detective Inspector forever. In real life, the good guys don’t always get there in time!

Isn’t that a great reason to pick up this book and to find out more?!
Thanks once again for this lovely interview, Keith Wright.

The Magic of Wor(l)ds

 

 

 

P.S. Are you an author (or publisher) who also wants a FREE interview like this? You can always contact me via e-mail!

 

#CoverReveal #BookOnTheBrightSide @BOTBSPublicity / #PromoPost : Hunting Ground #HuntingGround – L J Morris @LesJMorris

– ‘The Magic Of Wor(l)ds’ blog is a hobby, reviews and other bookish stuff on this site are done for free. –

Today I’m super pleased to be on the blogtour, organised by Book On The Bright Side, to reveal the cover of

Hunting Ground
by
L J Morris

But first some information.

About the Author :

Profile 1_LJML J Morris is an author with a lifelong love of books and storytelling that he developed as a child. He spent most of the 80s and 90s serving in the Royal Navy as a Weapons Engineer and now lives in Cumbria, with his family. He currently works within the defence industry and continues to write at every opportunity.
His short stories have appeared in several anthologies including Volumes 1 & 2 of Best-selling author Matt Hilton’s anthology series ‘ACTION: Pulse Pounding Tales’.
Other anthologies he has appeared in include ‘Happily Never After’, ‘Wish You Weren’t Here’, and ‘Liminal Time, Liminal Space’ where one reader described his tale ‘True Colours’ as “Riveting and powerful”.
His first novel ‘Desperate Ground’ was published in May 2018 and attracted good reviews.

Social Media Links:
Facebook
Twitter
Goodreads Author Page

Synopsis :

Freed from prison and back in Europe, Ali Sinclair has one job… find Frank McGill.
The information he has is vital if they are to end the conspiracy that threatens to bring down the Government and push NATO to the brink of war.
With terrorist attacks increasing and a mole at the top of the establishment, Sinclair and McGill will need to use all their skills to follow the clues across the continent in a deadly treasure hunt that drags them back towards London.But when you’re being hunted by assassins and the authorities… going home isn’t always the safest option.

After this great teaser I hope you are still excited for the cover reveal, because this is happening

right now!

hunting ground.jpg

Did this all pique your interest in reading the book? It will be available on Amazon just before publication day on the 29th of November!

 

The Magic Of Wor(l)ds

#CoverReveal #BookOnTheBrightSide @BOTBSPublicity / #PromoPost : Desperate Ground #DesperateGround – L J Morris @LesJMorris

– ‘The Magic Of Wor(l)ds’ blog is a hobby, reviews and other bookish stuff on this site are done for free. –

Today I’m super pleased to be on the blogtour, organised by Book On The Bright Side, to reveal the cover of

Desperate Ground
by
L J Morris

But first some information.

About the Author :

Profile 1_LJML J Morris is an author with a lifelong love of books and storytelling that he developed as a child. He spent most of the 80s and 90s serving in the Royal Navy as a Weapons Engineer and now lives in Cumbria, with his family. He currently works within the defence industry and continues to write at every opportunity.
His short stories have appeared in several anthologies including Volumes 1 & 2 of Best-selling author Matt Hilton’s anthology series ‘ACTION: Pulse Pounding Tales’.
Other anthologies he has appeared in include ‘Happily Never After’, ‘Wish You Weren’t Here’, and ‘Liminal Time, Liminal Space’ where one reader described his tale ‘True Colours’ as “Riveting and powerful”.
His first novel ‘Desperate Ground’ was published in May 2018 and attracted good reviews.

Social Media Links:
Facebook
Twitter
Goodreads Author Page

Synopsis :

When the secrecy of a nuclear weapon agreement is thrown into doubt, a disgraced intelligence operative is recruited to find out if the deal is still safe…
Ali Sinclair, wrongly convicted and on the run from a Mexican prison, is enlisted to infiltrate her old friend’s inner circle and find the evidence.
The only people on her side are an ex-Cold War spook and the former Royal Marine that was sent to find her. Together they discover that the stakes are much higher than anyone knew, and the fate of the world is at risk…
But when you live in the shadows who can you trust?

After this great teaser I hope you are still excited for the cover reveal, because this is happening

right now!

512sL7RjAwL

Did this all pique your interest in reading the book? It’s available at Amazon FOR FREE on October 31st and November 1st!

99p

The Magic Of Wor(l)ds