#BlogTour #RandRBookTours @RRBookTours1 @Shanannigans81 / #Review : Everyday Magic – Charlie Laidlaw @CLaidlawAuthor @RingwoodPublish

– ‘The Magic of Wor(l)ds’ blog is a hobby, reviews and other bookish stuff on this site are done for free.
I’m grateful of receiving a free copy from the publisher/author in exchange for an honest review of this book. –

About the Author :

Charlie LaidlawCharlie Laidlaw lives in East Lothian, one of the main settings for Everyday Magic. He has four other published novels: Being Alert!, The Space Between Time, The Things We Learn When We’re Dead and Love Potions and Other Calamities. Previously a journalist and defence intelligence analyst, Charlie now teaches Creative Writing in addition to his writing career.

Website | Facebook | Twitter

Synopsis :

Title: Everyday Magic
Publication Date: May 26th, 2021
Genre: Literary fiction / Contemporary Fiction / Humour
Publisher: Ringwood Publishing

Carole Gunn leads an unfulfilled life and knows it. She’s married to someone who may, or may not, be in New York on business and, to make things worse, the family’s deaf cat has been run over by an electric car.
But something has been changing in Carole’s mind. She’s decided to revisit places that hold special significance for her. She wants to better understand herself, and whether the person she is now is simply an older version of the person she once was.
Instead, she’s taken on an unlikely journey to confront her past, present and future.
Everyday Magic is an uplifting book filled with humour and poignancy, and reminds us that, while our pasts make us who we are, we can always change the course of our futures.

GoodReads

Ringwood Publishing
Amazon

Review :

‘Everyday Magic’ by Charlie Laidlaw is the third book I’ve read written by this author and once again I found it a unique read.
At its core it’s basically just a week in the life of Carole Gunn, but from page one you already know it will be so much more.
With the help of a little bit of magic we discover a lot about her life, not only in the present, but also in the past.
From the beginning Carole is, for me at least, a very relatable character in a realistic worldsetting which makes you really want to read all about her soul searching journey.
This may sound like a heavy topic, but as it’s so very compelling and entertainingly written, with a great dose of humor, you can’t do anything than fly through the pages.
Charlie Laidlaw definitely has a knack of telling a great story by not only making it intriguing, but also very heartwarming.
Needless to say, I thoroughly enjoyed reading this book and I’m convinced that you would too!

The Magic of Wor(l)ds

#CoverReveal #RandRBookTours @RRBookTours1 : Everyday Magic #EverydayMagic – Charlie Laidlaw @claidlawauthor @RingwoodPublish

– ‘The Magic of Wor(l)ds’ blog is a hobby, reviews and other bookish stuff on this site are done for free. –

Today I’m super pleased to be on the blogtour, organized by R&R Book Tours, to reveal the cover of

Cover Reveal Banner

But first some information.

About the Author :

Charlie LaidlawCharlie Laidlaw lives in East Lothian, one of the main settings for Everyday Magic. He has four other published novels: Being Alert!, The Space Between Time, The Things We Learn When We’re Dead and Love Potions and Other Calamities. Previously a journalist and defence intelligence analyst, Charlie now teaches Creative Writing in addition to his writing career.

Website
Facebook
Twitter

Synopsis :

Carole Gunn leads an unfulfilled life and knows it. She’s married to someone who may, or may not, be in New York on business and, to make things worse, the family’s deaf cat has been run over by an electric car.
But something has been changing in Carole’s mind. She’s decided to revisit places that hold special significance for her. She wants to better understand herself, and whether the person she is now is simply an older version of the person she once was.
Instead, she’s taken on an unlikely journey to confront her past, present and future.
Everyday Magic is an uplifting book filled with humour and poignancy, and reminds us that, while our pasts make us who we are, we can always change the course of our futures.

After this great teaser I hope you are still excited for the

blog-cover reveal

because this is happening

right now!

Did this all pique your interest in reading the book? It will be released May 26th, 2021.

The Magic of Wor(l)ds

Cover Reveal Organized By:

R&R Button

R&R Book Tours

#BookReleaseBlitz #RandRBookTours @RRBookTours1 @Shanannigans81 / #PromoPost : Being Alert! #BeingAlert – Charlie Laidlaw @CLaidlawAuthor

– ‘The Magic of Wor(l)ds’ blog is a hobby, reviews and other bookish stuff on this site are done for free. –

Blitz Banner

Today I’m on the ‘Being Alert!’ blogtour, organised by R&R Book Tours.
To promote this book I have some ‘basic’ information.

About the Author :

Charlie LaidlawI was born in Paisley, central Scotland, which wasn’t my fault. That week, Eddie Calvert with Norrie Paramor and his Orchestra were Top of the Pops, with Oh, Mein Papa, as sung by a young German woman remembering her once-famous clown father. That gives a clue to my age, not my musical taste.
I was brought up in the west of Scotland and graduated from the University of Edinburgh. I still have the scroll, but it’s in Latin, so it could say anything.
I then worked briefly as a street actor, baby photographer, puppeteer and restaurant dogsbody before becoming a journalist. I started in Glasgow and ended up in London, covering news, features and politics. I interviewed motorbike ace Barry Sheene, Noel Edmonds threatened me with legal action and, because of a bureaucratic muddle, I was ordered out of Greece.
I then took a year to travel round the world, visiting 19 countries. Highlights included being threatened by a man with a gun in Dubai, being given an armed bodyguard by the PLO in Beirut (not the same person with a gun), and visiting Robert Louis Stevenson’s grave in Samoa. What I did for the rest of the year I can’t quite remember
Surprisingly, I was approached by a government agency to work in intelligence, which just shows how shoddy government recruitment was back then. However, it turned out to be very boring and I don’t like vodka martini.
Craving excitement and adventure, I ended up as a PR consultant, which is the fate of all journalists who haven’t won a Pulitzer Prize, and I’ve still to listen to Oh, Mein Papa.
I am married with two grown-up children and live in central Scotland. And that’s about it.

Links:
Website
Facebook
Twitter

Synopsis :

Title: Being Alert
Publication Date: August 21st, 2020
Genre: Satire

Being Alert! coverThe book, which begins in January 2020, follows in a long tradition of British satire, as the British prime minister, Winston Spragg, first learns about a new virus that seems to be centred in a city in China that nobody has heard of.
The book populates Downing Street and Whitehall with an inept prime minister presiding over a dysfunctional government as it deals with an existential threat that rapidly becomes a national crisis.
It remains true to the timeline of Covid-19 and the government’s response to it, including its failure to lock down sooner, secure adequate supplies of protective equipment or protect the care sector.
Like satires before it, the book uses humour to paint an uncomfortable picture of a government in crisis, and seemingly as concerned about justifying itself as working to suppress the virus.
As the book progresses, with a mounting death toll, I hope the book strikes a changing balance as both a month-by-month narrative about the virus and a comedy to mirror unfolding events.
As the country emerges into a new normal, the country will inevitably want to know why, per head of population, we have suffered worse than any other European country. Being Alert! provides the perfect outlet, not just to ask very real questions of government but to use humour as a satirical and healing tool.

Goodreads

Amazon US
Amazon UK

The Magic of Wor(l)ds

BookRelease Blitz Organized By:

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R&R Book Tours

 

#Review : Love Potions and Other Calamities – Charlie Laidlaw @CLaidlawAuthor @headlinepg

– ‘The Magic of Wor(l)ds’ blog is a hobby, reviews and other bookish stuff on this site are done for free.
I’m grateful of receiving a free copy from the publisher/author in exchange for an honest review of this book. –

blog-review

Synopsis :

Book CoverTitle: Love Potions and Other Calamities
Publication Date: November 7th, 2019
Genre: Comedy
Publisher: Headline

Welcome to the strange world of Rosie McLeod, an amateur detective with a big difference. Her deductive powers are based solely on the careful preparation and use of plants and herbs.
Love Potions and Other Calamities is pure comedy, with a bit of drama thrown in, as Rosie sets out to discover whether her husband is having an affair and, as the story unfolds, to solve a murder – before she becomes the next victim.
Rosie McLeod, pub proprietor and a gifted herbalist of some renown, is thirty-nine and holding, but only just. The talons of her fortieth birthday are in her back and her bloody, bloody husband hasn’t laid a lustful hand on her for months.
She has the fortune, or misfortune, to live in one of Scotland’s most famous places – the East Lothian village of Holy Cross, which takes its name from the legendary Glastonbury Cross that was spirited away – and subsequently lost – when Henry VIII purged the English monasteries. The cross of pale Welsh gold, reputedly buried within the village, had at its centre a fragment of emerald from the Holy Grail. The story is, of course, complete baloney.
But the association with the Holy Grail and the later witch persecutions of James VI mean that the village is as well known around the world as Edinburgh Castle, haggis or Loch Ness. It has been described as “the heartbeat of Scotland” and is a major tourist destination – many of whom visit the village with metal detectors, hoping to discover the elusive cross.
However, a sighting of a large, black cat by the local Church of Scotland minister sets off a chain of events that lead back twenty years and, although the villagers are blissfully unaware of it, to a woman’s murder. The black cat had last been sighted near the village some two decades before, and the minister’s predecessor was sure that it had triggered something evil. The villagers, of course, think otherwise.
Nothing ever happens in Holy Cross.

Goodreads

Amazon UK
Amazon US

About the Author :

Charlie LaidlawI was born in Paisley, central Scotland, which wasn’t my fault. That week, Eddie Calvert with Norrie Paramor and his Orchestra were Top of the Pops, with Oh, Mein Papa, as sung by a young German woman remembering her once-famous clown father. That gives a clue to my age, not my musical taste.
I was brought up in the west of Scotland and graduated from the University of Edinburgh. I still have the scroll, but it’s in Latin, so it could say anything.
I then worked briefly as a street actor, baby photographer, puppeteer and restaurant dogsbody before becoming a journalist. I started in Glasgow and ended up in London, covering news, features and politics. I interviewed motorbike ace Barry Sheene, Noel Edmonds threatened me with legal action and, because of a bureaucratic muddle, I was ordered out of Greece.
I then took a year to travel round the world, visiting 19 countries. Highlights included being threatened by a man with a gun in Dubai, being given an armed bodyguard by the PLO in Beirut (not the same person with a gun), and visiting Robert Louis Stevenson’s grave in Samoa. What I did for the rest of the year I can’t quite remember
Surprisingly, I was approached by a government agency to work in intelligence, which just shows how shoddy government recruitment was back then. However, it turned out to be very boring and I don’t like vodka martini.
Craving excitement and adventure, I ended up as a PR consultant, which is the fate of all journalists who haven’t won a Pulitzer Prize, and I’ve still to listen to Oh, Mein Papa.
I am married with two grown-up children and live in central Scotland. And that’s about it.

Links:
Website
Facebook
Twitter

Review :

‘Love Potions and Other Calamities’ by Charlie Laidlaw is a quirky read to say the least.
It’s a story about a little village in Scotland with some very interesting characters and one big, mysterious black cat!
Speaking of them, I’m not sure if I love Rosie, the main character, who thinks turning forty is the end of her life.
She’s a bit too whiny and attention seeking for my taste I guess, but she certainly the cataclysm for everything funny that happened in the book.
So I guess she can stay, but I don’t want to be around when she turns fifty. 😉
I think it’s also fair to say that this book wasn’t really what I expected from reading the blurb as it was more a story about life in a village than a real mystery novel.
I had the feeling that the latter was almost added on to fit the genre somehow.
It wasn’t, in my opinion, a necessary add as the characters and the history about the village and the herbal parts were interesting enough to be a plot / story on their own.
I mean it’s fairly obvious how much research Charlie has done whilst and before writing this book on these topics.
That’s the main reason I read this book I believe as I was very intrigued and impressed with the details of the history about witches, the village and herbs and what not.
Very well done from the author!
This together with his writing style makes it, for me at least, an unique story, which may not have been completely my cup of tea, but was more than worth my reading time.
So I guess I’d recommend the book to everyone who likes a bit of experimental reading.

The Magic of Wor(l)ds

#BlogTour #RandRBookTours @RRBookTours1 @Shanannigans81 / #GuestPost : Love Potions and Other Calamities – Charlie Laidlaw @CLaidlawAuthor @headlinepg #Books #Comedy

– ‘The Magic of Wor(l)ds’ blog is a hobby, reviews and other bookish stuff on this site are done for free. –

Tour Banner

Today I’m on the ‘Love Potions and Calamities’ blogtour, organised by R&R Book Tours.
To promote this book I have some ‘basic’ information and a guest post.

About the Author :

Charlie LaidlawI was born in Paisley, central Scotland, which wasn’t my fault. That week, Eddie Calvert with Norrie Paramor and his Orchestra were Top of the Pops, with Oh, Mein Papa, as sung by a young German woman remembering her once-famous clown father. That gives a clue to my age, not my musical taste.
I was brought up in the west of Scotland and graduated from the University of Edinburgh. I still have the scroll, but it’s in Latin, so it could say anything.
I then worked briefly as a street actor, baby photographer, puppeteer and restaurant dogsbody before becoming a journalist. I started in Glasgow and ended up in London, covering news, features and politics. I interviewed motorbike ace Barry Sheene, Noel Edmonds threatened me with legal action and, because of a bureaucratic muddle, I was ordered out of Greece.
I then took a year to travel round the world, visiting 19 countries. Highlights included being threatened by a man with a gun in Dubai, being given an armed bodyguard by the PLO in Beirut (not the same person with a gun), and visiting Robert Louis Stevenson’s grave in Samoa. What I did for the rest of the year I can’t quite remember
Surprisingly, I was approached by a government agency to work in intelligence, which just shows how shoddy government recruitment was back then. However, it turned out to be very boring and I don’t like vodka martini.
Craving excitement and adventure, I ended up as a PR consultant, which is the fate of all journalists who haven’t won a Pulitzer Prize, and I’ve still to listen to Oh, Mein Papa.
I am married with two grown-up children and live in central Scotland. And that’s about it.

Links:
Website
Facebook
Twitter

Synopsis :

Book CoverTitle: Love Potions and Other Calamities
Publication Date: November 7th, 2019
Genre: Comedy
Publisher: Headline

Welcome to the strange world of Rosie McLeod, an amateur detective with a big difference. Her deductive powers are based solely on the careful preparation and use of plants and herbs.
Love Potions and Other Calamities is pure comedy, with a bit of drama thrown in, as Rosie sets out to discover whether her husband is having an affair and, as the story unfolds, to solve a murder – before she becomes the next victim.
Rosie McLeod, pub proprietor and a gifted herbalist of some renown, is thirty-nine and holding, but only just. The talons of her fortieth birthday are in her back and her bloody, bloody husband hasn’t laid a lustful hand on her for months.
She has the fortune, or misfortune, to live in one of Scotland’s most famous places – the East Lothian village of Holy Cross, which takes its name from the legendary Glastonbury Cross that was spirited away – and subsequently lost – when Henry VIII purged the English monasteries. The cross of pale Welsh gold, reputedly buried within the village, had at its centre a fragment of emerald from the Holy Grail. The story is, of course, complete baloney.
But the association with the Holy Grail and the later witch persecutions of James VI mean that the village is as well known around the world as Edinburgh Castle, haggis or Loch Ness. It has been described as “the heartbeat of Scotland” and is a major tourist destination – many of whom visit the village with metal detectors, hoping to discover the elusive cross.
However, a sighting of a large, black cat by the local Church of Scotland minister sets off a chain of events that lead back twenty years and, although the villagers are blissfully unaware of it, to a woman’s murder. The black cat had last been sighted near the village some two decades before, and the minister’s predecessor was sure that it had triggered something evil. The villagers, of course, think otherwise.
Nothing ever happens in Holy Cross.

Goodreads

Amazon UK
Amazon US

Guest Post :

Love Potions and Other Calamities is a book that was decades in the making. It was also first published in 2015 as The Herbal Detective.
I’m grateful that Accent Press acquired rights to it and, now that Accent have been acquired by Headline, that it’s being republished. It completes my trilogy of standalone books set in East Lothian, just outside Edinburgh.
Rude and risqué, it’s also a book that I’m proud of, not least because it’s the book on which I really learned how to write, and which has guided my writing style ever since.
It started off being a rather spooky book set in the south of England. It then moved to the Scottish Borders and became a quasi-police procedural.
Only later, when I realised that neither of those genres worked, did it become a rather wacky comedy.
My books are character and plot driven, and now balance humour with poignancy. Love Potions was the journey that got me to where I am.
The idea for the book came to me at university when, for one module, I studied the Scottish history of the 17th and 18th century.
This was the time of the witch persecutions, which was really another chapter in the story of Christian imperialism.
In the early days of that imperialism, the church much preferred to assimilate by stealth. For example, until 834, All Hallows was on 13th May – moved to 1st November by Pope Gregory to overlay an older pagan festival. So too Christmas, to overlay the pagan winter solstice (also known as Yule, hence our Yule log).
Witchcraft’s journey to demonic intolerance took several centuries. In 8th century Saxony, the death penalty existed for anyone killing a witch. In 11th century Hungary, Charlemagne decreed that there was no legal remedy against witches “since they do not exist.”
Bit by bit, the church flexing its muscles, tolerance was chipped away. By 15th century Hungary, the memory of Charlemagne now dimmed, a first offender found guilty of witchcraft was made to stand in the town square wearing a Jew’s cap, a symmetrical punishment alongside Europe’s other principal scapegoat.
Indeed, in many parts of Europe, the social exclusion of the witches was only matched by the social exclusion of Jews. It was merely a matter for individual societies to pick the scapegoat which best suited their particular circumstances.
In the Alps and Pyrenees they burned witches, in Spain they burned Jews – for the simple crime of being either a witch or a Jew. In 14th and 15th century Germany, it was the Jews who suffered; by the 16th century it was the witches. In the 20th century, it was the turn of the Jew again, the cycle of persecution turning full circle in the ovens of Auschwitz.
The last person in the UK to be prosecuted for witchcraft was Scottish housewife Helen Duncan, jailed for nine months in 1944 because, a spiritualist, she seemed to know too much about the war effort.
The real story of the witch persecutions was the church’s successful PR campaign to define as evil everything that had gone before. It was brutally effective.
But the cult of the scapegoat isn’t dead, and has contemporary resonance. Take your pick from immigrants, benefits scroungers, health tourists, investment bankers, gays, gypsies, Muslims… the list goes on and on.
And that’s witchcraft’s relevance for today, because by picking scapegoats we are also defining our own prejudices and intolerances, and looking for somebody to blame for society’s ills.
That is the premise of Love Potions. The central character, a gifted herbalist, may or may not be a witch…but just suppose that someone in the locality believes that she is, and also believes in the old punishment for a witch?
After all, one of the principal targets of the witch persecutions were the local wise women. These were the local herbalists – and therefore pharmacist, doctor and midwife. During the persecutions, it wasn’t a good career choice.
(As an aside, there is evidence that the demise of the wise women led to women giving birth of their backs. The male medical profession that replaced the wise women thought it was more decorous).
For the book to work, my herbalist had to be more than one-dimensional. To suspend readers’ disbelief, she has to demonstrate a real knowledge of herbalism. To make her enigmatic, she also has to demonstrate a knowledge of wicca and wiccan spells – for example, using poisons.
In that regard, it’s a book I wish I had never embarked upon. Having decided on its direction, I had to balance its idiocy with all those large dollops of herbal and wiccan facts.
All the herbal lore and wiccan spells in the book are therefore fact-based, a task that took forever to research!
I hope readers see beyond its humour and at least glimpse the real message the book contains. That bigotry and intolerance are wrong.
It might be rude and risqué, but humour can sometimes be a good medium for making a good point. I hope Love Potions does just that.

The Magic of Wor(l)ds

Blog Tour Organized By:

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#BlogTour #RandRBookTours @RRBookTours1 / #QandAs : The Space Between Time #TheSpaceBetweenTime – Charlie Laidlaw @claidlawauthor @AccentPress

– ‘The Magic of Wor(l)ds’ blog is a hobby, reviews and other bookish stuff on this site are done for free. –

x

Today I’m on the ‘The Space Between Time’ blogtour, organised by R&R Book Tours.
To promote this book I have a Q&As post, but before I let you read it first some ‘basic’ information.

About the Author :

Charlie LaidlawI was born in Paisley, central Scotland, which wasn’t my fault. That week, Eddie Calvert with Norrie Paramor and his Orchestra were Top of the Pops, with Oh, Mein Papa, as sung by a young German woman remembering her once-famous clown father. That gives a clue to my age, not my musical taste.
I was brought up in the west of Scotland and graduated from the University of Edinburgh. I still have the scroll, but it’s in Latin, so it could say anything.
I then worked briefly as a street actor, baby photographer, puppeteer and restaurant dogsbody before becoming a journalist. I started in Glasgow and ended up in London, covering news, features and politics. I interviewed motorbike ace Barry Sheene, Noel Edmonds threatened me with legal action and, because of a bureaucratic muddle, I was ordered out of Greece.
I then took a year to travel round the world, visiting 19 countries. Highlights included being threatened by a man with a gun in Dubai, being given an armed bodyguard by the PLO in Beirut (not the same person with a gun), and visiting Robert Louis Stevenson’s grave in Samoa. What I did for the rest of the year I can’t quite remember
Surprisingly, I was approached by a government agency to work in intelligence, which just shows how shoddy government recruitment was back then. However, it turned out to be very boring and I don’t like vodka martini.
Craving excitement and adventure, I ended up as a PR consultant, which is the fate of all journalists who haven’t won a Pulitzer Prize, and I’ve still to listen to Oh, Mein Papa.
I am married with two grown-up children and live in central Scotland. And that’s about it.

Links:
Website
Facebook
Twitter

Synopsis :

The Space Between Time Book CoverExpected Publication Date: June 20th, 2019
Genre: Contemporary Fiction/ Drama/ Dark Comedy

There are more stars in the universe than there are grains of sand on Earth…
Emma Maria Rossini appears to be the luckiest girl in the world. She’s the daughter of a beautiful and loving mother, and her father is one of the most famous film actors of his generation. She’s also the granddaughter of a rather eccentric and obscure Italian astrophysicist.
But as her seemingly charmed life begins to unravel, and Emma experiences love and tragedy, she ultimately finds solace in her once-derided grandfather’s Theorem on the universe.
The Space Between Time is humorous and poignant and offers the metaphor that we are all connected, even to those we have loved and not quite lost.

Goodreads
Amazon

Q&A :

Hi

First of all thank you very much for taking the time to answer my questions, I really appreciate it. Here we go! 🙂

Can you, for those who don’t know you already, tell something about yourself and how you became an author?
I was born and brought up in the west of Scotland and, after university, became a journalist, first in Scotland, then in London. After a stint in defence intelligence I became a public affairs advisor, and then into marketing consultancy.
However, writing has always been at my core. I wrote my first two books as a teenager, but it wasn’t until much later that I began to take it seriously. However, there’s a world of difference between taking writing seriously, and being taken seriously by publishers.
That takes persistence and, frankly, a dollop of luck.

Which books did/do you love to read as a child/now as a grown-up?
Anything by Graham Greene, Ernest Hemingway or Fay Weldon. But there have. Been many other writers who have influenced me, and continue to do so. The first book that really blew me away was Jenny by Paul Gallico.

Is there a writer whose brain you would love to pick for advice? Who would that be and why?
I don’t think there would be any one writer because, over the years, simply by reading many books, I’ve already taken a lot of advice from other writers. The craft of writing is something you learn, and books are the best teachers.

If you could, which fictional character (from your own book(s) or someone else’s) would you like to invite for tea and why?
Perhaps the enigmatic character of Vianne Rocher from Chocolat. She’s a little magical, and I’d like to know how much of her magic is culinary skill, and how much comes from a different kind of power.

Do you have some rituals or habits whilst writing?
Nope, I’m incredibly lazy when it comes to writing. I only write in short bursts, then do something else. I’m no longer driven to the same extent as I was as an unpublished writer.

Where do you come up with your idea(s)? Do people in your life need to be worried? 😉
Mostly, inspiration only ever comes in bite-sized chunks. You come up with an idea, then come up with the next idea until, lots of ideas later, you have a book. The only time I had a complete flash of inspiration for a whole book was my last novel, The Things We Learn When We’re Dead. It came to me on a train from Edinburgh to London, an apt place for inspiration because Edinburgh, a civilised place, is the only city in the world to have named its main railway station after a book.
When I got home, I wrote the first and last chapters. The first chapter changed out of all recognition; the last chapter is almost how I first wrote it.

Are you a plotter or do you go with the flow, as a pantser?
A plotter but, as my characters develop, I give them some leeway to do things differently.

Can you give novice writers some tips (do’s/don’ts)?
As I said, books are your teachers – so read and read. Nobody is born a writer; it’s a craft you have to learn. You have to understand characterisation and structure, narrative and dialogue. Books are the easiest way to learn those things. I’d also advise aspiring writers to be honest with themselves, to recognise strengths and weaknesses, and go about overcoming the latter.

What are your future plans as an author?
My next novel, Love Potions and Other Calamities, is due out in November. After that, who knows? I’m working on three other books, so I’ll have to see which one first sees the light of day!

Last, but not least, can you give my readers one teaser from your book, which is featured here on my blog, please?
I’m not sure I can give you a teaser. It’s a book about a young woman coming to terms with the world around her, and her feelings for those closest to her. It’s a book about false memory, but told with humour. I hope it’s an uplifting story.

Isn’t that a great reason to pick up this book and to find out more?!
Thanks once again for this lovely interview, Charlie Laidlaw.

The Magic of Wor(l)ds

Blog Tour Organized By:

R&R Button

R&R Book Tours

 

 

#Review : The Space Between Time #TheSpaceBetweenTime – Charlie Laidlaw @claidlawauthor @AccentPress

– ‘The Magic of Wor(l)ds’ blog is a hobby, reviews and other bookish stuff on this site are done for free.
I’m grateful of receiving a free copy from the publisher/author in exchange for an honest review of this book. –

Synopsis :

The Space Between Time Book CoverThere are more stars in the universe than there are grains of sand on Earth…
Emma Maria Rossini appears to be the luckiest girl in the world. She’s the daughter of a beautiful and loving mother, and her father is one of the most famous film actors of his generation. She’s also the granddaughter of a rather eccentric and obscure Italian astrophysicist.
But as her seemingly charmed life begins to unravel, and Emma experiences love and tragedy, she ultimately finds solace in her once-derided grandfather’s Theorem on the universe.
The Space Between Time is humorous and poignant and offers the metaphor that we are all connected, even to those we have loved and not quite lost.

Goodreads
Amazon

About the Author :

Charlie LaidlawI was born in Paisley, central Scotland, which wasn’t my fault. That week, Eddie Calvert with Norrie Paramor and his Orchestra were Top of the Pops, with Oh, Mein Papa, as sung by a young German woman remembering her once-famous clown father. That gives a clue to my age, not my musical taste.
I was brought up in the west of Scotland and graduated from the University of Edinburgh. I still have the scroll, but it’s in Latin, so it could say anything.
I then worked briefly as a street actor, baby photographer, puppeteer and restaurant dogsbody before becoming a journalist. I started in Glasgow and ended up in London, covering news, features and politics. I interviewed motorbike ace Barry Sheene, Noel Edmonds threatened me with legal action and, because of a bureaucratic muddle, I was ordered out of Greece.
I then took a year to travel round the world, visiting 19 countries. Highlights included being threatened by a man with a gun in Dubai, being given an armed bodyguard by the PLO in Beirut (not the same person with a gun), and visiting Robert Louis Stevenson’s grave in Samoa. What I did for the rest of the year I can’t quite remember
Surprisingly, I was approached by a government agency to work in intelligence, which just shows how shoddy government recruitment was back then. However, it turned out to be very boring and I don’t like vodka martini.
Craving excitement and adventure, I ended up as a PR consultant, which is the fate of all journalists who haven’t won a Pulitzer Prize, and I’ve still to listen to Oh, Mein Papa.
I am married with two grown-up children and live in central Scotland. And that’s about it.

Links:
Website
Facebook
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Review :

I must confess that when Charlie Laidlaw asked me to read his book ‘The Space Between Time’ I only said yes because I read his ‘biography’ on his website and liked how he had put humor into it.
I guess I’m a sucker for people who can tell something rather serious with a touch of laughter in it, without making it less important or ridiculous.
And this book definitely needed that, as it’s a story about humankind/family, the good and the bad, and how the mind tries to work around a certain situation.
It’s, I guess, not a novel for everyone, as it has a certain vibe in it, but I liked it very much!
Emma Rossini is a great character who depicts a seemingly normal life from childhood to adult.
We soon discover that not everything is what it seems, there are cracks in everything and everyone.
The way it’s portrayed reminds me a bit of how I noticed when growing up that the dynamics in a family can differ from point of views.
Everything is different when you see it as an adult and Charlie Laidlaw has the ability to write about it, from childhood to adulthood, in a captivating way.
He adds a bunch of greatly sculpted characters and a grandfather, who’s a bit of a weird, but loveable scientist, his Theorem in the storyline and somehow that helps to connect everything.
I’m fairly sure however that some won’t like those parts as it can be a bit much and this sciency stuff isn’t for everyone.
Nevertheless I found it intriguing and it makes me ponder about life, scientific theories and mental issues.
Really a book one should read to make the latter more common, more talkable, as now people don’t talk that often about their mental state as they don’t want to be perceived as a fruitcake 😉.
An original and recommendable book which I loved from the beginning till the end.

The Magic of Wor(l)ds

#CoverReveal #RandRBookTours @RRBookTours1 : The Space Between Time #TheSpaceBetweenTime – Charlie Laidlaw @claidlawauthor

– ‘The Magic Of Wor(l)ds’ blog is a hobby, reviews and other bookish stuff on this site are done for free. –

Today I’m super pleased to be on the blogtour, organised by R&R Book Tours, to reveal the cover of

The Space Between Time
by
Charlie Laidlaw

But first some information.

About the Author :

Charlie LaidlawI was born in Paisley, central Scotland, which wasn’t my fault. That week, Eddie Calvert with Norrie Paramor and his Orchestra were Top of the Pops, with Oh, Mein Papa, as sung by a young German woman remembering her once-famous clown father. That gives a clue to my age, not my musical taste.
I was brought up in the west of Scotland and graduated from the University of Edinburgh. I still have the scroll, but it’s in Latin, so it could say anything.
I then worked briefly as a street actor, baby photographer, puppeteer and restaurant dogsbody before becoming a journalist. I started in Glasgow and ended up in London, covering news, features and politics. I interviewed motorbike ace Barry Sheene, Noel Edmonds threatened me with legal action and, because of a bureaucratic muddle, I was ordered out of Greece.
I then took a year to travel round the world, visiting 19 countries. Highlights included being threatened by a man with a gun in Dubai, being given an armed bodyguard by the PLO in Beirut (not the same person with a gun), and visiting Robert Louis Stevenson’s grave in Samoa. What I did for the rest of the year I can’t quite remember
Surprisingly, I was approached by a government agency to work in intelligence, which just shows how shoddy government recruitment was back then. However, it turned out to be very boring and I don’t like vodka martini.
Craving excitement and adventure, I ended up as a PR consultant, which is the fate of all journalists who haven’t won a Pulitzer Prize, and I’ve still to listen to Oh, Mein Papa.
I am married with two grown-up children and live in central Scotland. And that’s about it.

Links:
Website
Facebook
Twitter

Synopsis :

There are more stars in the universe than there are grains of sand on Earth…

Emma Maria Rossini appears to be the luckiest girl in the world. She’s the daughter of a beautiful and loving mother, and her father is one of the most famous film actors of his generation. She’s also the granddaughter of a rather eccentric and obscure Italian astrophysicist.
But as her seemingly charmed life begins to unravel, and Emma experiences love and tragedy, she ultimately finds solace in her once-derided grandfather’s Theorem on the universe.
The Space Between Time is humorous and poignant and offers the metaphor that we are all connected, even to those we have loved and not quite lost.

After this great teaser I hope you are still excited for the cover reveal, because this is happening

right now!

Book Cover

Just look at it! Totally worth the wait!

Did this all pique your interest in reading the book? It will be released on June 20th, 2019, but it’s already available for pre-order at Amazon.

The Magic Of Wor(l)ds

Cover Reveal Organized By:

R&R Button

R&R Book Tours