#MiniBlogBlitz #RachelsRandomResources @rararesources / #QandAs : The Bistro by Watersmeet Bridget – Julie Stock @wood_beez48

– ‘The Magic of Wor(l)ds’ blog is a hobby, reviews and other bookish stuff on this site are done for free. –

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Today I’m on the ‘The Bistro by Watersmeet Bridget’ blogtour, organised by Rachel’s Random Resources.
To promote this book I have a Q&As post, but before I let you read it first some ‘basic’ information.

About the Author :

fP6zKcAQJulie Stock writes contemporary feel-good romance from around the world: novels, novellas and short stories. She published her debut novel, From Here to Nashville, in February 2015 and her second novel, The Vineyard in Alsace in March 2017. Over You (Sam’s Story) and Finding You (Jenna’s Story), her follow-up novellas to From Here to Nashville were published in 2018, making the From Here to You series complete. She has also published a boxed set of the From Here to You trilogy of books. Julie’s next novel, The Bistro by Watersmeet Bridge, will be out in summer 2019. If you’d like to sign up to her newsletter list, you can do so here. As a thank you, you’ll be able to download Before You, the prequel story to the From Here to You series, for free.
You can connect with Julie via her website, on Twitter, via her Facebook Author, and on Instagram. Julie is a member of the Romantic Novelists’ Association and The Society of Authors.
When she is not writing, she works in communications. She is married and lives with her family in Bedfordshire in the UK.

Synopsis :

When Olivia goes to manage Finn’s failing bistro, will they end up sharing a table for two, or will it be a recipe for disaster?
Olivia Fuller longs to manage one of the restaurants in her father’s chain and to break free to live the independent life she’s wanted for so long. When her father finally puts his trust in her and sends her to a failing restaurant in Devon, she’s confident she can prove herself capable of doing the job.
Finn Anderson is about to lose his beloved seaside bistro, unless the bank can find a buyer to dig him out. When George Fuller offers Finn a deal, he has no choice but to accept if he wants any chance of getting his bistro back one day. And then the new manager arrives…
Even after meeting the prickly chef and discovering his complete lack of business skills,
Olivia is confident she can turn the struggling business round. But as Olivia and Finn start working together, a mutual attraction develops between them, and soon, nothing is going according to Olivia’s plan.
When there’s a real chance that the bistro might be sold off, Olivia and Finn determine to fight for it, united by their hard work and their growing feelings for each other.
But can they save the bistro and be together, or does destiny have a different path in mind?
A feel-good contemporary romance set in a bistro beside the sea in Devon.

Purchase Links:
Amazon US
Amazon UK

Q&A :

Hi

First of all thank you very much for taking the time to answer my questions, I really appreciate it. Here we go! 🙂

Can you, for those who don’t know you already, tell something about yourself and how you became an author?
Thank you so much, Stefanie, for inviting me on to your blog. I’m a contemporary romance author of novels, novellas and short stories. I started writing about 6 years ago when I was in my late forties. I’d often thought about writing a novel but had never been able to come up with an idea that I would be able to sustain over 80/90,000 words. Then one day, an idea came and I sat down and started writing what became my debut novel, From Here to Nashville, and I haven’t looked back since!

Which books did/do you love to read as a child/now as a grown-up?
As a child, I loved reading from a very early age and we would go to the library every week to get a pile of books to read. It was my favourite time of the week! I used to love reading Enid Blyton, first the Magic Faraway Tree books, then the Naughtiest Girl in the School and Malory Towers. I loved them all. Later on, I loved the Anne of Green Gables stories and The Secret Garden.
As a grown up, I love to read romance of all kinds, from contemporary through to historical. I especially like really sad stories though! I love JoJo Moyes’ ‘Me Before You’ and ‘The Time Traveler’s Wife’ by Audrey Niffenegger. I’ve always loved Romeo and Juliet too 🙂 I love a real tearjerker. I find it quite cathartic.
I also love Robert Harris novels and I enjoy a really good thriller.

Is there a writer whose brain you would love to pick for advice? Who would that be and why?
I’ve recently discovered Rosanna Ley’s books and I find them so beautifully written. Rosanna also teaches creative writing but she lives a long way from me so I’ll probably never be able to attend one of her courses. If I could pick her brain for advice about writing craft and how she manages to weave setting into her writing, that would be wonderful.

If you could, which fictional character (from your own book(s) or someone else’s) would you like to invite for tea and why?
I read The Lady of Hay by Barbara Erskine not long ago, which was an absolutely fascinating story set both in modern day and in medieval England. So I’d invite the main character – Jo Clifford/the Lady of Hay who goes between the two periods – because I’d love to know more about what it was like to live in medieval times, but also to be regressed in the way that she was.

Do you have some rituals or habits whilst writing?
Not really. I write on a Mac using Scrivener with my notes next to me on my desk. If I’m struggling to keep going, and not get distracted, I’ll set a timer making myself write for 30 minutes and then take a break, before doing the same thing all over again. I just keep going until I reach my word count for the session. I do usually like to drink a cup of tea while writing.

Where do you come up with your idea(s)? Do people in your life need to be worried? 😉
It’s usually a setting that gives me an idea for writing, but not always. I’m inspired by things I read, TV programmes – fiction and non-fiction, my own life experiences. The list is endless now that I’ve finally started writing.
I do use things from normal life in my writing but I would never write someone I know into a book exactly as they are. I take aspects of lots of people and merge them into a character that way. So no-one needs to be too worried…

Are you a plotter or do you go with the flow, as a pantser?
I started out as a pantser but only because I’d had no experience, really. Then even as I was writing my first book, I knew that I should have done more planning. With each successive book, I have plotted it out more, but I keep things flexible so I can make changes if I want to.

Can you give novice writers some tips (do’s/don’ts)?
One piece of advice I would give is to make time for your writing. Lots of us think that we have no time to write, but with even a small mindset change, we can make time. So for example, when I was writing my first book and finding it hard to find time to write, I started writing in my lunch hour at work. In just half an hour a day, I started writing 300 words and that turned into 10,000 words within the month. That’s a book within 8 or 9 months.
As an indie author, I would advise new writers not to be constrained into thinking that the traditional publishing route is the only path to publication. Self-publishing is a viable option for everyone now and it can be mastered by most people with a little effort.

What are your future plans as an author?
As well as my new novel, The Bistro by Watersmeet Bridge, I have a short story collection coming out this summer (it may even be out by the time your readers read this post!) Then I will be starting work on a new novel in the autumn. I’m not sure whether it will be the second book in a series or a brand new book, but I will be writing.

Last, but not least : Can you give my readers one teaser from your book, which is featured here on my blog, please?
This teaser is from the end of chapter 2 when Olivia has just arrived at the restaurant, and she is trying to find out what went wrong before. Finn is on the defensive but Olivia is determined to get her way.

‘To put it simply, Mr Anderson, I want to know if you can cook, otherwise we’re lost before we’ve even started. I’d like you to make me your signature dish, please.’
‘My signature dish? What the hell do you mean by that?’
‘Surely you’re not telling me you don’t know what a signature dish is? I don’t think you can call yourself a chef if you don’t know that term.’ Her lips twitched as she teased him.
‘I know full well what a signature dish is, and you know that’s not what I meant.’
Olivia raised her eyebrows but said nothing.
Finn went on. ‘I want to know why you’re asking me to cook it. I don’t need your approval, you know.’
‘Not to put too fine a point on it, Mr Anderson, the only way I can find out if you can cook is if you make me something to eat. Then I’ll know whether the reason the restaurant failed is because you can’t cook, or whether it’s down to something else.’

Isn’t that a great reason to pick up this book and to find out more?!
Thanks once again for this lovely interview, Julie Stock.

Giveaway :

Win Signed copy of The Bistro by Watersmeet Bridget and goodies (UK Only)
The prize will contain
• Signed paperback,
• Notebook with front cover on
• Postcard magnet with front cover on
• Bookmark with front cover on
• Bag of Devon fudge

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*Terms and Conditions – UK entries welcome. Please enter using the Rafflecopter box below. The winner will be selected at random via Rafflecopter from all valid entries and will be notified by Twitter and/or email. If no response is received within 7 days then Rachel’s Random Resources reserves the right to select an alternative winner. Open to all entrants aged 18 or over. Any personal data given as part of the competition entry is used for this purpose only and will not be shared with third parties, with the exception of the winners’ information. This will passed to the giveaway organiser and used only for fulfilment of the prize, after which time Rachel’s Random Resources will delete the data. I am not responsible for despatch or delivery of the prize.

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P.S. Are you an author (or publisher) who also wants a FREE interview like this? You can always contact me via e-mail!

 

 

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#BlogTour #RachelsRandomResources @rararesources / #PromoPost : The Stationmaster’s Daughter – Kathleen McGurl @KathMcGurl

– ‘The Magic of Wor(l)ds’ blog is a hobby, reviews and other bookish stuff on this site are done for free. –

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Today I’m on the ‘The Stationmaster’s Daughter’ blogtour, organised by Rachel’s Random Resources.
To promote this book I have a some ‘basic’ information for you.

About the Author :

PepDrn7gKathleen McGurl lives near the sea in Bournemouth, UK, with her husband. She has two sons who are now grown-up and have left home. She began her writing career creating short stories, and sold dozens to women’s magazines in the UK and Australia. Then she got side-tracked onto family history research – which led eventually to writing novels with genealogy themes. She has always been fascinated by the past, and the ways in which the past can influence the present, and enjoys exploring these links in her novels.

Social Media Links:
Twitter
Facebook
Website

Synopsis :

As the last train leaves, will life ever be the same?
Dorset 1935
Stationmaster Ted has never cared much for romance. Occupied with ensuring England’s most beautiful railway runs on time, love has always felt like a comparatively trivial matter. Yet when he meets Annie Galbraith on the 8.42 train to Lynford, he can’t help but instantly fall for her.
But soon the railway is forced to close and a terrible accident occurs within the station grounds, Ted finds his job and any hope of a relationship with Annie hanging in the balance…
Present day
Recovering from heartbreak after a disastrous marriage, Tilly decides to escape from the bustling capital and move to Dorset to stay with her dad, Ken. When Ken convinces Tilly to help with the restoration of the old railway, she discovers a diary hidden in the old ticket office. Tilly is soon swept up in Ted’s story, and the fateful accident that changed his life forever.
But an encounter with an enigmatic stranger takes Tilly by surprise, and she can’t help but feel a connection with Ted’s story in the past.

Purchase Links:
Amazon UK
Amazon US

The Magic of Wor(l)ds

#BlogTour #RandRBookTours @RRBookTours1 / #QandAs : The Devil’s Apprentice #TheDevilsApprentice #TheGreatDevilWar – Kenneth B. Andersen @K_B_Andersen

– ‘The Magic of Wor(l)ds’ blog is a hobby, reviews and other bookish stuff on this site are done for free. –

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Today I’m on the ‘The Devil’s Apprentice’ blogtour, organised by R&R Book Tours.
To promote this book I have a Q&As post, but before I let you read it first some ‘basic’ information.

About the Author :

Author PicI WAS BORN IN DENMARK ON A DARK AND STORMY NIGHT IN NOVEMBER 1976 …
… and I began writing when I was a teenager. My first book was a really awful horror novel titled Nidhug’s Slaves. It didn’t get published. Luckily.
During the next 7 years, I wrote nearly 20 novels–all of which were rejected–while working as a school teacher. The rest of the time I spent writing.
In 2000 I published my debut fantasy book, The Battle of Caïssa, and that’s when things really took off. Since then I’ve published more than thirty-five books for children and young adults in genres ranging from fantasy to horror and science fiction.
My books have been translated into more than 15 languages and my series about the superhero Antboy has been adapted for film, which is available on Netflix. An animated tv series is currently in development.
A musical of The Devil’s Apprentice opened in the fall 2018 and the movie rights for the series have also been optioned.
I live in Copenhagen with my wife, two boys, a dog named Milo and spiders in the basement.
About THE GREAT DEVIL WAR: The Great Devil War was published in Denmark from 2005-2016, beginning with The Devil’s Apprentice.
Even though the story (mostly) takes place in Hell and deals with themes like evil, death and free will, it is also a humoristic tale about good and evil seen from a different perspective. A tale that hopefully will make the reader – young or old, boy or girl – laugh and think.
Welcome to the other side!

Author Links:
Kenneth B. Andersen
Twitter
Facebook
Instagram

Synopsis :

Book CoverTitle: The Devil’s Apprentice (The Great Devil War #1)
Genre: YA Fantasy

Philip is a good boy, a really good boy, who accidentally gets sent to Hell to become the Devil’s heir. The Devil, Lucifer, is dying and desperately in need of a successor, but there’s been a mistake and Philip is the wrong boy. Philip is terrible at being bad, but Lucifer has no other choice than to begin the difficult task of training him in the ways of evil. Philip gets both friends and enemies in this odd, gloomy underworld—but who can he trust, when he discovers an evil-minded plot against the dark throne?

Goodreads

Amazon

The Great Devil War Books 1 – 3

Q&A :

Hi

First of all thank you very much for taking the time to answer my questions, I really appreciate it. Here we go! 🙂

Can you, for those who don’t know you already, tell something about yourself and how you became an author?
I’m 42 years old and used to be a school teacher, now a full time writer. I was born in Denmark and I live in Copenhagen with my wife, two sons and a dog. I began writing in high school. I’ve always loved to read, but when I was introduced to Stephen King it blew my mind. I was 15 years old when my school teacher gave me a copy of ”The Shining” and I was hooked. King inspired me (as well as many others) to start writing. But I wasn’t very good at it and it took me seven years and fifteen turned-down manuscripts before I finally got my first book published. But I was never close to giving up – on the contrary. It became an obsession for me to write something that was good enough to get published. Which finally happened in 2000. Since then I’ve published more than 35 books.

Which books did/do you love to read as a child/now as a grown-up?
”Narnia” and ”The Never-Ending Story” were favourites of mine. But mostly I was into horror when I was a kid. Still am, but now I’m more selective. I’m always excited when a new King-novel comes out. I’m also a big fan of his son Joe Hill. His graphic novel ”Locke & Key” is awesome. I try to read all different kind of genres, but like things with a twist. I recently discovered the author Christina Henry. She’s very good. I like it when the world we know is turned upside down, but I value credibility above all else. Not in the sense of story, but the way the story is told. Credibility and language.

Is there a writer whose brain you would love to pick for advice? Who would that be and why?
If I can go with a dead one, I’d pick Ray Bradbury. I’ve read all his books and short stories – ”Fahrenheit 451” is a book everyone should read (and no, it doesn’t count if you just see the movie). A tremendous imagination, a tremendous langauge, a tremendous mind.

If you could, which fictional character (from your own book(s) or someone else’s) would you like to invite for tea and why?
I would love to have both the Devil, God and Death over for tea (all characters in The Great Devil War). It would be a lot of fun, I think. And I would have a lot of questions for them.

Do you have some rituals or habits whilst writing?
I drink a cup of coffee or two and that’s it. No music, just silence. I write four hours a day. I have an office in my basement and I write from 8 am – 10 am and then again from 1 pm – 3 pm. I don’t aim for a certain amount of words or pages. Sometimes I write half a page in two hours if things go slow, sometimes three pages. It depends.

Where do you come up with your idea(s)? Do people in your life need to be worried? 😉
I often get inspired by reading books and watching movies, and sometimes I even get my ideas from them. A good example of this is ”The Devil’s Apprentice”. Years ago I was reading a Danish novel called “Little Lucifer”, where the main character misbehaves and someone yells at him, that he’s the Devil’s apprentice. At the exact moment I read those two words I thought that would be awesome: To write a story about a boy who literally ends up as that – the Devil’s Apprentice. In Hell where he is to be trained in evil by the Devil himself. Hell is very much inspired by Dante’s Divine Comedy – although my Hell differs a lot from Dante’s.

Are you a plotter or do you go with the flow, as a pantser?
I’m a plotter, but at the same time I try to go with the flow. If new (good) ideas pop up, then the plot will change. When I started writing ”The Devil’s Apprentice”, I basically knew everything that was going to happen. But I didn’t know, that I was actually starting a story which would turn out to be much, much bigger, making The Devil’s Apprentice book 1 of 6 in The Great Devil War series.

Can you give novice writers some tips (do’s/don’ts)?
Write a lot and read a lot. Books are good for inspiration, but it’s by writing and writing and writing you develop your own style and your own ideas. And if you want to be good at something then you have to practice. And not give up.

What are your future plans as an author?
Years ago I wrote a superhero series called Antboy. I wrote six books, which were turned into three movies (they are available on Netflix, low-budget, but high-charm 😊) Right now I’m working on three, maybe four more Antboy books. I’m also working hard on getting some of my other books out in English.

Last, but not least : Can you give my readers one teaser from your book, which is featured here on my blog, please?
In this scene Philip has just arrived at the gates of Hell, meeting the gatekeeper (the demon on the cover of the book) for the first time.

“You’re fairly young, aren’t you?” A forked tongue moistened his scaly fingers, and the gatekeeper flipped through more pages. “How old are you?”
“I’m thirteen.”
“Thirteen?” the beast mumbled, clearly impressed. “It’s not very often they come to us so young. You must’ve done something really horrific.”
“What do you mean?” Philip shook his head. “What is this place?”
“This place?” The monster raised an eyebrow. “Haven’t you figured it out yet? Oh well, evilness and stupidity often go hand in hand.” His crooked smile revealed pointed teeth, and his gruff voice lowered to a hiss. “This, my boy, is the outer court of Hell. That—” he directed a hooked nail at the black gate, “is Hell.”

Isn’t that a great reason to pick up this book and to find out more?!
Thanks once again for this lovely interview, Kenneth B. Andersen.

The Magic of Wor(l)ds

Blog Tour Organized By:

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P.S. Are you an author (or publisher) who also wants a FREE interview like this? You can always contact me via e-mail!

 

#BlogTour #FrasersFunHouse @FrasersFunHouse / #QandAs : The Children Of Lir – Marion Grace Woolley @AuthorMGW

– ‘The Magic of Wor(l)ds’ blog is a hobby, reviews and other bookish stuff on this site are done for free. –

The Children of Lir Banner

Today I’m on the ‘The Children Of Lir’ blogtour, organised by Fraser’s Fun House.
To promote this book I have a Q&As post, but before I let you read it first some ‘basic’ information.

About the Author :

MGW Author PhotoMarion Grace Woolley writes dark fiction and historical fantasy from her home in Kigali. When she’s not writing her own material, she edits technical reports, ghostwrites biographies, and is attempting to build the first piano in Rwanda.

Website
Blog
Twitter
Facebook
Instagram
Goodreads

Synopsis :

The Children of Lir CoverGenre: Historical Fantasy
Word/page count: 119,000 words/467 pages
Publication Date: August 15th 2019

A curse that lasted 900 years, a legend that lasted forever.
From the Iron Age of Ireland to the dawn of Christianity, this epic retelling traverses the realms of magic and sorcery. From the fort of Fionnachaidh to the watery wastes of Sruth na Maoile, it tells of the downfall of an ancient race and the children caught in its wake.
Grieving for the loss of his wife, King Lir marries her younger sister, Aoife. Jealous of her husband’s children she calls on the power of the Aos Sí and their Phantom Queen, making a bargain that will cost her life.
The children, turned to swans, are cast out upon the waves in an adventure that sees empires rise and fall as centuries pass. Eventually, they must choose between the world they once knew and a future they do not understand.

Amazon UK

Q&A:

Hi

First of all thank you very much for taking the time to answer my questions, I really appreciate it. Here we go! 🙂

Can you, for those who don’t know you already, tell something about yourself and how you became an author?
I’ve always loved writing stories. I’d make them up even in primary school, but spelling and grammar took a lot longer to master. I was very into MUDs, which are online text-based adventures, and that really helped to feed my interest. A friend showed me how to start building them and it was a real kick to see people walking around a world I’d created and interacting with the characters. It helped me to understand the importance of description and dialogue.
I was about twenty-seven when I wrote my first novel, Lucid. I was a volunteer Sign Language researcher in Rwanda at the time. I didn’t have a television or a radio, and books were hard to come by, so I had a lot of spare time in the evenings and few distractions. I wrote it to see whether I could make the word count as I’d never written anything that long before. I caught the bug and haven’t looked back since.

Which books did/do you love to read as a child/now as a grown-up?
I have very fond memories of the Puddle Lane series, which were children’s books with text on one side and a picture on the other. Under the picture was a sentence from the text in large print. My dad would make me read the sentence before he would continue with the rest of the story, so they really helped me learn to read.
Later, I loved Fighting Fantasy books, Point Horror – anything a little bit dark. Then graduated onto Stephen King and Terry Pratchett in my teens. I used to love going book shopping with my parents, just looking at the covers, reading the backs and taking in the smell of a new book.
Nowadays, I read very eclectically. I like factual books like Yuval Noah Harari’s Sapiens and Peter Frankopan’s The Silk Roads, as I like to learn about human development. I also like writers such as Nii Parkes, Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, Madeline Miller, and quirky stuff like Jorge Luis Borges. If it’s a good story, I’ll pick it up.

Is there a writer whose brain you would love to pick for advice? Who would that be and why?
I’m at a stage now where I teach English and creative writing, so I feel fairly confident in my own abilities, but there are definitely writers who have inspired me and who I greatly admire. Stephen King’s On Writing is obviously up there as an excellent guide to writing, and Joel Stickley’s 101 Ways to Write Badly Well, which takes examples of bad writing to the extreme and is very comical, so you remember the lessons because you’re laughing so much.
I hugely admire the style of authors like Chitra Banerjee Divakaruni and Arundhati Roy. There’s a really lyrical quality to their writing which reads like poetry. They make it look so easy, but there’s a fine line between poetic and verbose. Reading them is a masterclass in how to do it well.

If you could, which fictional character (from your own book(s) or someone else’s) would you like to invite for tea and why?
I think I’d avoid my own characters. Most of them are the kind of people you would go to lunch with and end up as the main course.
It might be entertaining to attend a feast at Pratchett’s Unseen University, but being a woman, I’m not sure I’d be welcome. I think Yhatzee Crowshaw’s Diablerie would be a fascinating, if extremely chaotic, dinner guest. The house might not be standing afterwards. So, I think I’d opt for tea with Howl and Sophie at Howl’s Moving Castle by Diana Wynne Jones. Afterwards, I’d like to play with the magic door.

Do you have some rituals or habits whilst writing?
I’m not really a creature of habit. I don’t have any writing routines, but once I’ve finished a novel, I like to take a hard copy somewhere nice and edit it in the garden of a restaurant with a coffee. I was travelling with a friend after finishing The Children of Lir and did the hard edit in Kibuye, on the shores of Lake Kivu in western Rwanda. It’s an utterly stunning location with lush, green islands and spectacular sunsets. You see the lamps of the fishing boats in the evening, and the fishermen singing as they bring in the catch. It was the perfect setting to finish up a legend about the sea.

Where do you come up with your idea(s)? Do people in your life need to be worried? 😉
Ideas tend to come to me either through travelling or from history, folklore and interesting things that I’ve read. My first published novel was called Angorichina, which was about a place in South Australia that I stayed for a night. It was a backpackers’ hostel that had once been a TB sanatorium. The Children of Lir is based on a story I first read on a trip to southern Ireland with my family. It’s hard to say where ideas come from. I think you fall in love with many things throughout your life, but not all of those passions have enough gusto to go for ninety to a hundred-thousand words. Often a book is a conglomeration of ideas that all sort of compliment each other and fall into place. When you’re interested in something, you want to share that enthusiasm and put it into words.
My characters are usually a patchwork of experiences and emotions taken from many sources. I don’t base them specifically on any one person that I know. When you write fiction, I think you have to let go of the world around you, otherwise you start dragging it into your stories and the real world shapes what you say. It places judgements and preconceptions on your writing, and I think readers notice that.

Are you a plotter or do you go with the flow, as a pantser?
I’m an unequivocal pantser. I very rarely plan anything. The downside of that is that you don’t always know if you’ve got a viable story when you start, but a good story tends to tell itself. You navigate your way through it. I like to be surprised by where the story goes. I’ve always found it difficult to pace endings because, once I know what the ending is, I’m ready tolet go. Sometimes I have very clear scenes in my head that I know I want to get in there somewhere, but I don’t always find an appropriate place, or, by the time I get there, the scene has changed. I think it’s good to set off along a path, but if you’re too focused on what’s in front of you, sometimes you miss the most interesting detours.

Can you give novice writers some tips (do’s/don’ts)?
Boring as it sounds, grammar is your best friend. Content’s great, but grammar gives your story pace. None of us manage it all of the time, but you’re aiming to be so smooth your reader doesn’t realise they’re reading. Language is a type of magic for making people see things, creating worlds in their heads, so you need to learn to cast the spell. When you get it right, the images become more vivid than print on paper.
That aside, read lots. Don’t just read for pleasure, but read to learn how other people write. What makes it good? Practice different styles of writing. Push outside your comfort zone and genre. Pastiche is a great way to deconstruct language and add to your skills.
Finally, write about the things you’re fascinated by. Don’t worry if you’re not an expert in the subject, you can learn. You have Wiki, YouTube, books and a world of experts just an e-mail away. The details are important, but fill them in as you go. Don’t let them hold you back from a good story.

What are your future plans as an author?
Just to keep writing. I’ve recently finished a manuscript about post-mortem photography, split between Victorian England and the present day. I have another planned about ancient Sumer. So long as I keep having ideas, I’ll keep putting them to paper.

Last, but not least : Can you give my readers one teaser from your book, which is featured here on my blog, please?
Sure. Here’s a little taster from Aoife. She’s one of the key characters of the ancient legend, the wicked stepmother who turned her children to swans. Of course, there’s more to it than that, but this is the first time we meet her at the Feast of Age:

Lir had arrived. Sidh-ar-Femhin was awash with the fact.
“Did you see his son holding their banner high? He could barely announce himself,” one drunk slurred through a mouthful of mead.
“There’s nothing of him to announce,” another joined in. “His clothes hang from him and his hair looks moon-stained. I reckon he was summoned, for he did not look glad to be here.”
My head was swimming with soma, the sparks of the fire spoke to me in riddles and rhyme.
“He’s come,” they whispered, their voices crackling like burnt twigs. “He’s here, he’s come.”
I swept them away with one hand and reclined, losing myself in the soft strings of the cláirseach. I did not wish to think on Lir, for his face held many reflections of my past. In his children I saw my sister’s face, and in their voices I heard her sing. It reminded me how alone I was. How alone I had always been. As the youngest of Oilell’s daughters, my heart had been left behind upon the shores of Aran. Aobh and Ailbhe were strong, but I was not. I cowered every day of our early years. A shadow in the glowing flame of Bodb’s constant light. Every time Queen Medb touched me it felt like ice and I shivered. My sisters tell me I was too young to remember our mother, but some senses transcend memory: her touch, her kisses, her scent.
Sometimes she would come to me in dreams, or in the visions of the dark juice which quenched my thirst for escape. I lived for the rituals and the holy days when we emptied the blood of animals upon the land and sucked down the sacred potions which allowed us to leave our bodies, to race with the hares and the wild horses, to sink beneath the sea with the selkies, the merrows and the slow-moving monsters of the deep.

Isn’t that a great reason to pick up this book and to find out more?!
Thanks once again for this lovely interview, Marion Grace Woolley.

The Magic of Wor(l)ds

 

 

 

P.S. Are you an author (or publisher) who also wants a FREE interview like this? You can always contact me via e-mail!

 

#BlogTour #DamppebblesBlogTours @damppebbles / #QandAs : The Fault #TheFault – Kitty Sewell #KittySewell @honno #ReadWelshWomen

– ‘The Magic of Wor(l)ds’ blog is a hobby, reviews and other bookish stuff on this site are done for free. –

The Fault Blog Tour banner.png

Today I’m on the ‘The Fault’ blogtour, organised by Damppebbles Blog Tour.
To promote this book I have a Q&As post, but before I let you read it first some ‘basic’ information.

About the Author :

kitty sewellKitty Sewell was born in Sweden, and has had four successive nationalities, living in the Canary Islands, Central and South America, Canada, England, Wales and Spain where she now lives in the mountains of Andalucía. She is a successful sculptor, and bestselling author. Her books have been translated into 15 languages and she has been short-listed for the CWA New Blood Dagger Award, the Wales Book of the Year, Winner of the “People’s Choice” BBC Radio Wales Prize, and the Bertelsmann Book Clubs International Book of the Month. She also writes as Kitty Harri. With Honno she has published Ice Trap (2005, later bought by Simon & Schuster) and Hector’s Talent for Miracles (2007) as Kitty Harri.

Website

Synopsis :

The Fault - coverChilling thriller set on Gibraltar – at the heart of The Rock are secret tunnels, hard to navigate and even harder to escape. Sebastian is a civil engineering prodigy and his latest project is his most ambitious to date: to build a new city on the sheerest face of The Rock. His fiancee, Eva, a diver, is entranced by the penisula’s hidden depths and concerned that her lover doesn’t push himself beyond human limits in his desire to see his dream realised. Mimi, still in her teens, is desperate to spread her wings and chafing at the limits placed on her movements by her overprotective older brother. When Mimi gets into a relationship with a neighbour intent on fighting the new development, Sebastian’s precarious mental health spirals out of control putting them all in danger. When Mimi is lost amidst their twists and turns the race is on to find her before the water rises.

Purchase Links:
Amazon UK
Amazon US
Waterstones
Hive
Book Depository

Publishing Information:
Published in paperback and ebook formats by Honno Press on 18th July 2019.

Q&A :

Hi

First of all thank you very much for taking the time to answer my questions, I really appreciate it. Here we go! 🙂

Can you, for those who don’t know you already, tell something about yourself and how you became an author?
I am Swedish by birth but have lived in many countries and speak several languages as a result. When moving to the UK from Canada many years ago I started writing a column for the South Wales Evening Post on the subject of personal growth. After ten years this column was syndicated to many newspapers through the Northcliffe Newspaper Group. It gave me a good grounding and weekly discipline for writing. Concurrently I attended short writing courses, wrote many short stories, and finally applied to do an M.A. in Creative Writing. I wrote the psychological suspense novel Ice Trap as my dissertation. Little did I know that it would become an international bestseller.

Which books did/do you love to read as a child/now as a grown-up?
I loved all the Famous Five. My first book was The Little Princess, followed by Anne of Green Gables and the Heidi books (all in Swedish). As a teen I graduated to science fiction, a favorite being Ursula Le Guin. Nowadays I read so many books it is hard to name a favorite author. I don’t often read thrillers or suspense (preferring to write them), but enjoy writers like Rose Tremain, Annie Proulx, Margaret Atwood, J.M. Coetzee, Ian McEwan, Helen Dunmore, to name a recent handful. I also love autobiographies, and books for the soul, such as about Buddhism, meditation and mysticism.
Because I am also a sculptor, I spend a lot of time working with my hands, and I am also an avid walker. For that reason I rarely read paper books but listen to them on audio whilst physically active. Good actors sometimes will bring books to life in a way that your eyes cannot. It allows me to listen to five or more books a week.

Is there a writer whose brain you would love to pick for advice? Who would that be and why?
I would love to have a chat with Stephen King, because, even though I find most of his novels a bit on the dark side, I am agog with admiration for his skill, stamina, prolific output and sheer unrelenting flow of creativity and imagination. I’ve of course read his book On Writing but I want to know more about what makes this man such a giant, and have it rub off a little on me.

If you could, which fictional character (from your own book(s) or someone else’s) would you like to invite for tea and why?
I would like to have a chinwag with Madeleine, one of the two heroines in my novel Bloodprint. She is probably the most interesting and complex character I have created, being a psychotherapist, a painter, a myrmecologist (look it up!) and a practitioner of Santeria, a type of voodoo practiced in Cuba since the days of slavery, having originated in Africa. We have quite a few things in common – not the voodoo though. It’s a bit scary.

Do you have some rituals or habits whilst writing?
When I get down to it I work like a beaver, hours and hours every day, sometimes sitting in bed with my laptop propped on a pillow. It’s not a good habit for your posture and your bed gets full of crumbs. I use “scene cards”, nice quality blank cards on which I give an overview of every scene in no more than three sentences. I use a different coloured felt pen for each character, so I can quickly see who is in the scene. I lay the cards out sequentially on my bed, so that I have the whole story in front of me. It is very useful for continuity, and often tells you to move scenes around.
I really recommend giving each character a back story and bio before starting to write, even if you never use the info in the story. This will inform your writing all the time and saves you endless backpedalling and tweaking.

Where do you come up with your idea(s)? Do people in your life need to be worried? 😉
Indeed they need to be worried. I base all my characters on people I have met, but most of them have quite a bit of me in them as well. All my novels are set in exotic locations, and I get my first ideas from the fascination I feel about a place. The Fault was inspired by a month I spent in Gibraltar. I was so taken with the underbelly of the place, the convoluted history, the miles and miles of tunnels and deep sea caves, the Neanderthal findings, the people and their quirky language (Yanito), a story set there immediately started brewing in my mind.

Are you a plotter or do you go with the flow, as a pantser?
I think a bit of both. Personally I need to have a good plot in place before I start, but having created the characters and set them free on the path, I let them play out their destinies by themselves. I am often surprised at the way they react to their dilemmas and resolve them.

Can you give novice writers some tips (do’s/don’ts)?
I have tons of do’s and don’ts, but here are a few.
Readers hate glaring misinformation, so I like to be totally sure about my facts. I do a lot of research. This leads to surprising new knowledge which can enhance your story.
Always remember: Show Don’t Tell. Wherever you can act out a scene, act it out, even scenes from the past (back story).
Don’t be afraid to show your writing to supportive friends, family and/or other writers, and ask for their critique. Don’t be defensive about your work. If you want to master your craft you need to hear the worst – and really listen.
Work every day, even if it is only half an hour.
Try not to get bogged down with endless editing. Let your creativity flow unhindered.
Don’t forget humour, no matter how serious or dark your story.

What are your future plans as an author?
Writing a novel is exhausting especially if, as with me, it takes two years plus. At the end of each novel, I wonder sincerely if I have the energy for another one. Every author knowns the sheer time, love and perseverance it takes, and this is without ever knowing if the novel will make the author a meagre living, or even see publication.
I have been very lucky, so I am optimistic about each of my novels. When I have recovered from The Fault, I will surely start another. I can always fall back on my other professions of Sculptor and Psychotherapist!

Last, but not least : Can you give my readers one teaser from your book, which is featured here on my blog, please?

‘Let go of me,’ she said, trying to pull away. ‘Enough, please. Let’s get to the surface.’
‘Be sensible now. I need you to be a little bit brave,’ he said. His soft monotone voice echoed around the tunnel walls. ‘There is absolutely nothing dangerous down here. There are no rats, no snakes, no ghosts or murderers or rapists. There are so many tunnels and so many openings in The Rock, there is always air flowing freely. There is even food and water.’
Her breath caught. ‘What do you mean, food and water?’
He held her at arms’ length and peered into her face. His eyes shone with excitement. ‘Yes food and water to last for years. Seven years, more or less exactly. This is what I want to show you. A secret chamber.’ He pointed downwards, towards the depths of the rock. ‘Someone has made a home deep down there. A real home.’
She swallowed repeatedly and shook her head. ‘No, really. I don’t want to see it. I’m not interested.’
‘We’ve come this far. We’re not going back without seeing it.’
Her fear transmuted a thousand times. So many scenarios traded places in her mind, one more terrifying than the next. Why had she not suspected a trap like this?
‘Please,’ she begged, pushing away from him. ‘Please don’t make me go down there.’
‘Just trust me,’ he said, holding her arms in a firm grip. ‘I am doing this out of love.’

Isn’t that a great reason to pick up this book and to find out more?!
Thanks once again for this lovely interview, Kitty Sewell.

The Magic of Wor(l)ds

dpbt 2

 

 

 

P.S. Are you an author (or publisher) who also wants a FREE interview like this? You can always contact me via e-mail!

 

 

 

#BlogTour #SilverDaggerBookTours @SDSXXTours / #QandA and #GiveAway : Wild Magic Series – Eileen Troemel @EileenTroemel

– ‘The Magic of Wor(l)ds’ blog is a hobby, reviews and other bookish stuff on this site are done for free. –

wild magic series banner

Today I’m on the ‘Wild Magic Series’ blogtour, organised by Silver Dagger Book Tours.
To promote this book I have some ‘basic’ information, a Q&A and a giveaway for you.

About the Author :

EileenFrom poetry to novel, I enjoy telling a good story or expressing a heartfelt emotion. I’ve been published in Circle Magazine, The American Tarot Association’s Quarterly Journal, What’s Cooking America, Children, Churches and Daddies, placed second in Words of Women 2010 Writing Contest, 2012 Daily Flash, and The Deadman’s Tome. I have a bachelor’s degree in business and a second bachelor’s degree in English Professional Writing and Book Editing. On the side, I have a small editing business. In addition to my work, I love to read, crochet, crafting, research genealogy, and spend time with family. I have three adult daughters and have been married to my husband for over 30 years. I’m the proud grandma of three fur babies – my daughters’ cats.

Website
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Synopsis :

Wild_Magic_600x900_400x600.jpgTitle: Wild Magic (Wild Magic Series Book 1)
Genre: Paranormal Fantasy

Mallory’s magi gifts send her north into the province where almost all the magi were killed. If anyone discovers she is a magi, her life is in peril. But she must go where her gifts send her. A boy needs her help or he will die.
Leland, Pintra, Faolan, Jadan, Ovra, and Erga travel from Scons province to Lins to seek a magi master. In a small village Jadan gets separated and is accused of theft. Without Mallory’s help, the angry mob will kill him. Mallory steps in, uses her gifts to save him but exposes herself as a magi.
The seven escape the angry village and hide out in caves. When Jadan’s injuries turn deadly, Mallory is forced to use her gifts, exposing herself to the group of strangers she doesn’t trust. Is she the magi master they’ve been looking for or will they turn her in for the bounty?

Goodreads

Amazon
Apple
B&N
Kobo
Smashwords

Hostile_Magic_600x900_400x600Title: Hostile Magic (Wild Magic Series Book 2)

Tensions rise between the leaders of Linos and Scons. Linos increases their soldiers at the border. War looms on the horizon.
Refugees flee from hunters into Scons. Garlen wants to protect them but prophecy warns of danger and betrayal.
Garlen sets aside his lingering distrust of magic and Mallory to protect his new daughter, Arial and his province.
Family – is it those you’re born to or those you love? Mallory meets her blood family. Anger clouds her judgement. Will her emotions cause harm to the family of her heart?

Goodreads

Amazon
Apple
B&N
Kobo
Smashwords

Q&A :

Do you prefer to write in silence or with noise? Why?
Usually with classical or Celtic music. Because this works for me and it allows my characters to talk to me.

Do you write one book at a time or do you have several going at a time?
I currently have about 22 WIP going. I don’t actively write on all of those but I tend to work on clusters. I just finished three stories for my pen name and am working on two more under my own name.

Pen or type writer or computer?
Computer – though I’ve done the pen thing.

What made you want to become an author and do you feel it was the right decision?
I love to tell a story and explore different aspects of story. It was definitely the right decision.

A day in the life of the author?
So I don’t have typical days… but here’s how my life goes generally.
6:00 drag my sorry butt out of bed – mornings suck – check social media and sales for all books
7:45 be at my day job – check social media and jot down any ideas – in between my day job tasks as I’m expected to actually work at my day job.
12:30 take lunch, edit a manuscript, look at book cover ideas, check social media, answer emails… oh and don’t forget to eat.
4:00 leave my day job to go home and spend time with husband and daughter – eat supper and wait (sometimes less than patiently) for them to go away so I can write.
7:00 – 12:00 – I’m writing (if life is good and the characters like me today) if I’m not writing, I’m editing, reading, crocheting (to create patterns to publish)
12:00 – 6:00 – sleep because people tell me I need to – this 12:00 thing is variable depending on how well the words are flowing.
Now on a weekend, I handle things like web site design and maintenance, marketing (this is a daily thing), social media, writing, editing, creating book covers, writing blurbs, learning about editing, and networking with other authors.

Advice you would give new authors?
Be tenacious and don’t let people put down your writing. If you don’t have good grammar, learn it. If you don’t know how to edit, learn it or pay for it.

Giveaway :

Follow the tour here for exclusive content and win $25 Amazon via this Rafflecopter giveaway. Good luck, everyone!

The Magic of Wor(l)ds

Blog Tour Organized By:

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Silver Dagger Book Tours

#BlogTour #LoveBooksTours @LoveBooksGroup / #QandAs : Hidden – Roger A. Price @RAPriceAuthor @Endeavour_Media

– ‘The Magic of Wor(l)ds’ blog is a hobby, reviews and other bookish stuff on this site are done for free. –

Hidden.jpg

Today I’m on the ‘Hidden’ blogtour, organised by Love Books Group Tour.
To promote this book I have a Q&As post, but before I let you read it first some ‘basic’ information.

About the Author :

ProfilePhoto MicrosoftI was born in Bury, raised in Whitley Bay, and have lived in Lancashire since I was thirteen. Currently living in Preston, I served for over thirty-one years with the Lancashire Constabulary, the Regional Crime Squad and the National Crime Squad.
I retired in the rank of detective inspector in charge of a covert unit, which received local and national acclaim for its successes in engaging those who openly sold Class A drugs, such as heroin and crack cocaine.
Prior to this I led the C.I.D. in Preston for a short while and before that I was in charge of a dedicated informant unit. Previous experiences include work on many murder investigations and other serious crimes, as well as time spent on drug squads.
I have served around the region, country, and overseas. My work on the National Crime Squad took me across Europe and to the Far East. I have been commended on four occasions.
I now write fiction based in-part on my experiences, and in-part from my fevered imagination.
I write full time, and in addition to my crime novels I am developing a TV crime drama.
I am represented by the ever patient and erudite Olav Wyper at SMA Talent Ltd. London.

Website

Synopsis :

Hidden Cover ArtVinnie’s romantic holiday did not go as planned. There was an assault, his companion was threatened and the police asked them to leave.
And when Vinnie returns to his police job in Manchester, things don’t get much better, as he finds himself at the heart of an investigation that stretches from Manchester to all corners of Europe. Women are being trafficked into the UK and forced into prostitution, and while the police are diligent in their enquiries, they seem to have a rogue in their midst.
As events unravel, the lines between good and bad, police and criminals, seem to become more and more blurred… and the stakes for all involved are getting higher.

Hidden is Book 3 in Roger Price’s the badge and the pen series, but it can equally be read as a novel in its own right. Existing fans of Vinnie and Christine are bound to love it, but Hidden is also perfect for crime and police fiction lovers, and anybody who loves a fast-paced, gripping story.

Amazon

Q&A :

Hi

First of all thank you very much for taking the time to answer my questions, I really appreciate it. Here we go! 🙂

Can you, for those who don’t know you already, tell something about yourself and how you became an author?
Always wanted to write, but as a busy detective I never found the time. I did a correspondence course followed by a college night school course and eventually knuckled down to it after I left the cops. I have travelled the world on investigations and worked on many squads so have plenty of experiences to draw from for inspiration. Though my novels to date have all been wholly fictional bar the odd sparkle of truth!

Which books did/do you love to read as a child/now as a grown-up?
I was inspired by the wonderful books of Enid Blyton as a child, but rarely found the time to read as an adult unless I was on holiday. And even though I write full time now I ensure I have some time left to read for my own pleasure.

Is there a writer whose brain you would love to pick for advice? Who would that be and why?
There are quite a few! But I’ll settle for Jeffrey Archer, or Lee Child. Archer to probe how he takes from his life’s experiences and uses them to such effect in his novels, and Child as to how he continues to keep Jack Reacher so interesting and relevant.

If you could, which fictional character (from your own book(s) or someone else’s) would you like to invite for tea and why?
It would be pretty cool to sit and chat with Jack Reacher, and ask him if he’ll ever put down roots?

Do you have some rituals or habits whilst writing?
I drink too much coffee and don’t go to the loo enough; bad combination. I sometimes get lost in my writing until my bladder makes me look at the clock and I realise 4 or 5 hours have passed.

Where do you come up with your idea(s)? Do people in your life need to be worried? 😉
I always base my characters on a combination of features plucked from many people. I never base a character from one person. Too restrictive in what you can do with the character, and you might offend (or even libel) someone if you need them to do something nasty. All my ideas are fictional but driven from real experiences to give them authenticity – hopefully. Though all my procedures are based on fact.

Are you a plotter or do you go with the flow, as a pantser?
I’m usually a pantser, but did plot my last book. The latter makes the writing easier, but the former allows for a more creative freedom. So, I think I’ll try a combination of the two next time. An intricate skeleton as a plot which would then allow me to put the flesh on as I write.

Can you give novice writers some tips (do’s/don’t’s)?
Study the craft before you start, and have your first completed novel edited by a literary consultant to highlight all the structural errors. Then re-write to that template, and keep it as a reference until you develop beyond it. For example, a common fault is getting point of view wrong, or all mixed up. (I did). Decide on how many viewpoint characters you are going to have – not too many – and who will be your main character. Give them the main voice. Stay in a character’s mind whenever you can and only use authorial voice when you have to. The longer you stay within a character when describing things, be that action or dialogue, the closer and more intimate the reading experience becomes. Show not tell when you can. If you don’t get the basics right, no publisher will read it past the first couple of pages, and you may have written the best story never told.

What are your future plans as an author?
To write more Badge & the Pen series novel-wise, and to continue writing script. I have written a 6-part TV Drama called McCall & Stamp about two cops who are covert trouble-shooters who are brought in when undercover type of jobs go wrong. That is currently being sent out to producers by my agent so wish me luck. I would love to get in to writing for TV but will always churn out novels as well.

Can you give my readers one teaser from your book, please?
If you want to find out what is rarer than a ‘dropped pie in Wigan’ you’ll have to read Hidden to find out!

Isn’t that a great reason to pick up this book and to find out more?!
Thanks once again for this lovely interview, Roger A. Price.

The Magic of Wor(l)ds

 

 

 

P.S. Are you an author (or publisher) who also wants a FREE interview like this? You can always contact me via e-mail!