#BlogTour #RachelsRandomResources @rararesources / #QandAs : The White and Gold People – Segun Starchild @Akashic84

– ‘The Magic of Wor(l)ds’ blog is a hobby, reviews and other bookish stuff on this site are done for free. –

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Today I’m on the ‘The White and Gold People’ blogtour, organised by Rachel’s Random Resources.
To promote this book I have a Q&As post, but before I let you read it first some ‘basic’ information.

About the Author :

TQKJe0NwSegun Starchild is a writer whose previous works include ‘Black Egyptians’, ‘The Capability Test’ & ‘Kamun vs. Leviathan’. He is a self confessed seeker of ‘The Truth’ and has a great hunger to know the mysteries of life. He has studied the esoteric mysteries of great sages to gain a reputable amount of wisdom and has the blessing of taking a journey through life with confidence and true knowledge of self and kind. He hails from the Yoruba tribe in Nigeria and is for the unification of the African continent. Segun currently lives in London, working in IT Development and Support and the director of Akasha Publishing Ltd.

Social Media Links:
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Pinterest
Website
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Twitter
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Facebook

Synopsis :

qJ0Lah9AA dress causes a huge debate across the world as some see it as black and blue and others see it as white and gold. The white and gold people suddenly start to get even stranger visions and develop super human abilities making the black and blue people seem old and inadequate. The government try to quarantine and control their power but the white and gold people react setting the stage for a war between the rival groups.

Purchase Links:
Book Website
Amazon
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iTunes
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hLjQYPEQ

Q&A :

Hi

First of all thank you very much for taking the time to answer my questions, I really appreciate it. Here we go! 🙂

Can you, for those who don’t know you already, tell something about yourself and how you became an author?
I like to think of myself as an Indigo Child and lightworker, that is, someone with incredible ‘gifts’ that can change the world for better. I became an author from reading a lot and being exposed to what I think is a wide range of spiritual and higher knowledge concepts and wanted to share it with others.

Which books did/do you love to read as a child/now as a grown-up?
I read a lot of Roald Dahl, Goosebumps was popular, and I remember reading the boy in the bubble.

Is there a writer whose brain you would love to pick for advice? Who would that be and why?
George R.R Martin, the author of Game of Thrones. He is a writing God, how to write such depth and volume and repeat it over a series of books is an incredible feat, and I could certainly learn from him.

If you could, which fictional character (from your own book(s) or someone else’s) would you like to invite for tea and why?
Lara Croft, because she has been on such amazing adventures, is fearless and good looking!

Do you have some rituals or habits whilst writing?
I like to treat myself to whatever I need to keep me going. Coffee, protein shakes, snacks, e.t.c Sometimes the hours can be long and the writing process daunting, so I need whatever pleasure I can get, lol!

Where do you come up with your idea(s)? Do people in your life need to be worried? 😉
I have a very vivid imagination and I watch a lot of sci-fic, anime and TV/Movies. Everything is related in some way so is a twist on something else. And yes I use some elements of peoples characters in my books even myself. As a writer you are the first point of centre of your book so it must come through you and your experiences right.

Are you a plotter or do you go with the flow, as a pantser?
I definitely go with the flow when writng fiction, but non-fiction is a lot more organised. The joy of writing comes with going with the flow as it’s a journey of self-discovery. Saying that. the most I would plan is a few headlines and ideas but from there its pretty much write as you go!

Can you give novice writers some tips (do’s/don’ts)?
You have to stay focused. The more you write the more you enjoy it and your story becomes part of you. Become obsessed, watch movies, travel and read for inspiration and don’t be scared to write what you want!

What are your future plans as an author?
I have a long list of books I would like to write so it’s a question of slow and steady and one step at a time. I’ll be starting the sequel to The White & Gold People towards the end of the year and I’m looking forward to that, as I don’t even know what’s going to happen yet, lol. I would definitely like to get worldwide translations, movie deals and huge sales. It’s why we write, I’m sure other authors would agree.

Last, but not least: Can you give my readers one teaser from your book, which is featured here on my blog, please?
The Goldies are more awakened so they feel more, they want more and this carries over into their sexual life. Most of the Goldies engage in naked yoga and have wild sexual escapades.
Here is an excerpt between two of the leading characters getting it on:

He walked up to her and kissed her on the lips, grabbing her gently by the side of her face and her thin blonde hair. The chemistry was electrifying, and she kissed him back pushing her body close to his. LaShawn took off his shirt, and began kissing her neck, working his way down to her upper chest. Taking his hands behind her, he unloosened her bra and took off her top, feeling her soft warm breasts pressed against his pecs. She began to feel his groin, and clumsily took off his belt and pulled down his trousers to feel his erect penis. She looked in his face intently and started kissing him again. “Your eyes,” she said. “They’re yellow.” He smiled. “So are yours.”

Isn’t that a great reason to pick up this book and to find out more?!
Thanks once again for this lovely interview, Segun Starchild.

Giveaway :

Win a T-Shirt, in the colours of the dress, in either white and gold or blue and black. (UK Only)

*Terms and Conditions – UK entries welcome. Please enter using the Rafflecopter box below. The winner will be selected at random via Rafflecopter from all valid entries and will be notified by Twitter and/or email. If no response is received within 7 days then Rachel’s Random Resources reserves the right to select an alternative winner. Open to all entrants aged 18 or over. Any personal data given as part of the competition entry is used for this purpose only and will not be shared with third parties, with the exception of the winners’ information. This will passed to the giveaway organiser and used only for fulfilment of the prize, after which time Rachel’s Random Resources will delete the data. I am not responsible for despatch or delivery of the prize.

a Rafflecopter giveaway

The Magic of Wor(l)ds

 

 

 

P.S. Are you an author (or publisher) who also wants a FREE interview like this? You can always contact me via e-mail!

 

#BlogTour #RachelsRandomResources @rararesources / #QandAs : Restoration – More tales from the House that Sat Down (The House That Sat Down Trilogy #2) – Alice May @AliceMay_Author

– ‘The Magic of Wor(l)ds’ blog is a hobby, reviews and other bookish stuff on this site are done for free. –

The House That Sat Down Trilogy

Today I’m on the ‘The House That Sat Down Trilogy’ blogtour, organised by Rachel’s Random Resources.
To promote book 2 “Restoration – More tales from the House that Sat Down” I have a Q&As post, but before I let you read it first some ‘basic’ information.

About the Author :

The House - Alice MayI am a multi-tasking parent to four not-so-small children, and I am fortunate enough to be married to (probably) the most patient man on the planet. We live in, what used to be, a ramshackle old cottage in the country. Our house began to fall down out of the blue one day, which resulted in the whole family living in a tent in the back garden for quite some time, while we worked out how to rebuild our home.
A few years afterwards, I decided to write a book and, once I started, I found I couldn’t stop.
Inspired by true-life events ‘Accidental Damage – tales from the house that sat down’ wouldn’t leave me alone until it was written.
Within six months of self-publishing my novel, I was delighted to learn that it had won two ‘Chill with a Book Awards’. This was a massive honour and motivated me to continue writing. Accidental Damage became the first book in a trilogy.
The Omnibus edition of all three books in the House That Sat Down Trilogy is now available via Amazon in both paperback and kindle format.

Social Media Links:
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Synopsis Book 2 in The House That Sat Down Trilogy :

96XAis-wLet us return to the crumbling cob cottage in the country, and our intrepid heroine and her hilarious family.
They are about to start rebuilding their home and their lives. Of course, nothing is going to go smoothly for them, is it?
In this sequel to ‘Accidental Damage – tales from the house that sat down’ we accompany our heroine on her journey as she bravely battles to restore everything that she loves; often against the odds and with a liberal sprinkling of humour, art and home-made cookies along the way.
One this is for sure, it’s going to be a bumpy ride!

Amazon UK

Also available
as a trilogy

The House That Sat Down Omnibus CoverInspired by a true story, The House That Sat Down Trilogy is a tale of triumph over tragedy. It is an astonishing account of sudden, first-world homelessness in the heart of the New Forest, and the unexpected consequences. Written entirely from a mother’s point of view, following the collapse of her family’s home, it is an uplifting and positive read in spite of the subject matter, with a thread of wry humour throughout. Follow this ordinary woman on an extraordinary journey of survival and self discovery as she reels from disaster, before picking herself up and coming back stronger and wiser than before.
Packed with humorous observations about what it is like to live in a tent in your garden with your husband and four children after a significant part of your house falls down out of the blue one day, this story takes you from the depths of despair right through to the satisfying heights of success against the odds, with lots of tea and cakes on the way.
Follow this crazy family as they cope with disaster in their own truly unique and rather mad way, and celebrate each small triumph along the way with them.

Purchase Links:
Amazon UK
Amazon US

Q&A :

Hi

First of all thank you very much for taking the time to answer my questions, I really appreciate it. Here we go! 🙂

Can you, for those who don’t know you already, tell something about yourself and how you became an author?
Hello, I’m Alice May and I have been writing for about four years now. I have recently given up my career as a GP practice manager and am focussing on all things book and writing related. Having spent my childhood as an avid reader, I never thought that I would ever write a book, so it has come as quite a surprise to me to find myself the author of three novels as part of The House That Sat Down Trilogy.

Which books did/do you love to read as a child/now as a grown-up?
There are so many books and so little time. I loved to read as a child, but I have to confess that I genuinely think children’s literature these days is so much more exciting compared to what was available when I was growing up. I’d love to have had the opportunity to read books by John Flanagan, Ali Sparkes, Ali Condie, Michael Grant and Veronica Roth when I was a teenager. Other favourites have to be Robert Galbraith, Claire McGowan, Lisa Gardner, but the list is simply too long. We are so lucky to have to many talented authors out there producing such exciting pieces of work.

Is there any writer whose brain you would love to pick for advice? Who would that be and why?
For me, the answer to that has to be J. K. Rowling, because she is so very talented. She faced adversity in early stages of her journey as a writer and battled against the odds to get where she is today. I think she would be a fascinating person to have a chat with.

If you could, which fictional character (from your own book(s) or someone else’s) would you like to invite for tea and why?
/

Do you have some rituals or habits whilst writing?
Not really, I have such a hectic schedule that I find myself simply being very grateful when any time presents itself when I might actually do some writing. I have learned to grab these opportunities as quickly as possible, boot up my laptop and get typing. No time to waste on rituals. I do have a coffee habit though.

Where do you come up with your idea(s)? Do people in your life need to be worried? 😉
So far, the ideas just arrive and I am very grateful. No doubt there will come a time when I have to actually sit and try to make them up but, so far, this hasn’t been a problem. As for the people in my life, I am an avid people watcher, but I am always extremely careful to create original characters based on a mixture of bits and pieces that I’ve observed from a multitude of sources around me.

Are you a plotter or do you go with the flow, as a pantser?
A little bit of both, to be honest; for the most part, I usually have a general plot in mind, but in many cases I simply put my characters into a room and see what happens. It can be very entertaining. However, whether the resultant chapter ends up in the book depends very much on how successful the outcome is.

Can you give novice writers some tips (do’s/don’ts)?
The best advice I can give is to keep going. There will be highs and lows in your journey as a writer, but, if you are serious about it, then you have to put in the time, keep picking yourself up if you get knocked back, and don’t take it all too seriously. Some people will like your work and others won’t. You can’t please everyone so make sure that you are happy with your work. Keep your goal in sight and don’t get diverted. One step at a time, you will get there.

What are your future plans, as an author?
My future plans as an author involve finishing my next novel, the first in a brand-new trilogy. I’ve been through the whole manuscript assessment stage and am now working on the second draft based on those initial reactions and comments.

Last, but not least: Can you give my readers one teaser from your book, which is featured here on my blog, please?
Well the most frequently asked question I get, when attending book launches and speaking events, is ‘why did the house sit down?’ It’s a reasonable enough question, after all people’s houses don’t usually ‘sit’ down do they? However we are talking about a 350-year-old property with an extensive and complicated history so there are a number of possible causes. It is such an intrinsic part of the plot, though, that I never give away any clues. I usually answer by saying that they have to read the book to find out. However, as a teaser for your readers I will say this, it isn’t any of the usual or obvious reasons that you might think would cause a house to ‘sit’ down. I really hope you enjoy finding out what the real culprit is. 🙂

Isn’t that a great reason to pick up this book and to find out more?!
Thanks once again for this lovely interview, Alice May.
Thank you so much for hosting The House That Sat Down Trilogy on your blog.
Love
Alice

The Magic of Wor(l)ds

 

 

 

P.S. Are you an author (or publisher) who also wants a FREE interview like this? You can always contact me via e-mail!

 

#BlogTour #RachelsRandomResources @rararesources / #QandAs : The Raided Heart – Jennifer Wilson @inkjunkie1984

– ‘The Magic of Wor(l)ds’ blog is a hobby, reviews and other bookish stuff on this site are done for free. –

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Today I’m on the ‘The Raided Heart’ blogtour, organised by Rachel’s Random Resources.
To promote this book I have a Q&As post, but before I let you read it first some ‘basic’ information.

About the Author :

J-Th524QJennifer C. Wilson is a marine biologist by training, who developed an equal passion for history and historical fiction whilst stalking Mary, Queen of Scots on childhood holidays (she has since moved on to Richard III). Enrolling on an adult education workshop on her return to the north-east of England for work reignited her pastime of creative writing, and she has been filling notebooks ever since. In 2014, Jennifer won the Story Tyne short story competition, and has been working on a number of projects since, including co-hosting the North Tyneside Writers’ Circle. Her Kindred Spirits novels are published by Crooked Cat Books and her time-slip novella, The Last Plantagenet?, by Ocelot Press. She lives in North Tyneside, and is very proud of her approximately 2-inch sea view.

Social Media Links:
Website
Amazon
Facebook
Twitter
Instagram

Synopsis :

Iawwp3igMeg Mathers, the headstrong youngest sibling of a reiving family on the English-Scottish border, is determined to remain at her childhood home, caring for the land and village she’s grown up with. When an accident brings her a broken ankle and six weeks in the resentful company of ambitious and angry young reiver Will Hetherington, attraction starts to build. Both begin to realise they might have met their match, and the love of their lives, but 15th century border living is not that simple, as Meg soon finds herself betrothed to the weakling son of a tyrannical neighbour, Alexander Gray. When tragedy strikes, can Meg and Will find their way back to each other, and can Will finally take his own personal revenge on Gray?

Purchase Links:
Amazon UK
Amazon US

Q&A :

Hi

First of all thank you very much for taking the time to answer my questions, I really appreciate it. Here we go! 🙂

Can you, for those who don’t know you already, tell something about yourself and how you became an author?
Thanks so much for hosting me today! About me… I sometimes feel a bit of a fraud here. I’m a marine biologist by training, and in the day job, and only ever took English Literature and Language to GCSE, but was always obsessed with history in the background, and began reading a lot of historical fiction during my teens. After university, I got back into my reading, and joined an adult-education creative writing course as a way to meet people, and just haven’t looked back.
Through that course, I rediscovered my love of historical fiction, and began coming up with ideas again, and working on old ones. As part of NaNoWriMo 2013, I wrote the first draft of Kindred Spirits: Tower of London, which became my first novel, when I was brave enough to send it off to Crooked Cat Books.

Which books did/do you love to read as a child/now as a grown-up?
As a child, I adored the Enid Blyton stories, but more the adventure books than the Famous Five tales. I was also a huge fan of the Chalet School books, convinced I wanted to go to a boarding school in Europe for a couple of years. I had the whole collection; they were wonderful books.
These days, I read mostly historical fiction, with the occasional contemporary romance thrown in, if the plot really appeals. Having stopped reading fiction entirely during my university days, getting back into reading novels has been lovely, and is the only reason I enjoy my daily commute on the Metro – it’s a great chance to get through a couple of novels a week.

Is there a writer whose brain you would love to pick for advice? Who would that be and why?
That’s tricky! There are three historical fiction writers who I love, and would jump at the chance to chat with for advice and general snippets: Philippa Gregory, Elizabeth Chadwick, and Anne O’Brien. All of them have this great way of writing about real historical people and events, but in such a way that even when you know the outcome, you’re really hoping that things might just be different this time…

If you could, which fictional character (from your own book(s) or someone else’s) would you like to invite for tea and why?
I read mostly historical fiction, so a lot of the people I read (and write) about, are real, rather than fictional, so, other than all the amazingly handsome highlanders I read about, I think I would go for either Anne Boleyn or Mary Queen of Scots. I think they were both women far more modern than their times allowed them to be, and that was part of their downfall. It would be fascinating to get an insight into their worlds, see what they were truly thinking, not just what official documents, or court gossip, was saying about them. I think both would probably be quite happy about the fact that they’re still so large in the public’s awareness, and seen as historical heroines.

Do you have some rituals or habits whilst writing?
I read somewhere that this can be a dangerous habit to get into, in case something breaks your habit or ritual, leaving you unable to write, so I don’t really have any rituals, but I do make sure there’s always a drink to hand. I’ve recently moved my computer set up into the spare room now too, so I can avoid any distractions on TV.

Where do you come up with your idea(s)? Do people in your life need to be worried? 😉
Not just yet, although, a colleague has inspired one of the characters in my draft contemporary romance. He isn’t the hero (that would be weird), but he has a very calming persona, and seemed a very good person to be a reliable deputy manager in the ‘friend’ role.
For the Kindred Spirits series, I’ve not had to come up with any new characters for myself, so for The Raided Heart, I did make sure I spent some time thinking about the new characters, making sure they were realistic and believable. Meg in particular took a lot of work between the 2009 and 2019 drafts, as I’d realised everything in the plot was being ‘done to her’, rather than her making any decisions for herself. So I made sure in the final version, she’s a stronger character.

Are you a plotter or do you go with the flow, as a pantser?
These days, I have to plan. With working full-time, I like to be able to sit down and know where I’m going, so I can get started straightaway, and with my old method, that was just never possible. I’d write snippets of bits here and there, throughout the story (which was a loose idea at best), and then panic, and use index cards to put it all together when I was around 30,000 words in. The last two novels, I’ve plotted through, start to finish, and it’s made the whole process a lot less stressful. I still don’t necessarily write from the beginning to the end, but at least, if I do dot around the story, I know how it will all work by the end. Probably.

Can you give novice writers some tips (do’s/don’ts)?
The biggest Do is to keep writing, whatever genre or field you’re in. There’s simply no other way to get better at it, however many workshops you attend, or books you read. Go to the workshops, read the books, but then keep writing, following up whatever you started following a prompt, or practise what the book suggested.
I think for a Don’t, it would be to not beat yourself up if the words aren’t flowing for whatever reason. We all have plenty of issues in our lives, whether that’s work, family or friends, and there are times when we just cannot write. During those periods, enjoy some reading, watch some drama similar in style or genre to what you want to write, and if you’re stressing about not writing, just label it all as ‘research’ so it still feels like you’re working. Once you have the background issues sorted, the words will probably start to flow again, but there’s a real chance that whatever you write when you’re unhappy will need reworking, so save yourself too much hassle, and have a break instead.

What are your future plans as an author?
To keep writing! I have so many things I want to do. There are at least two, possibly three more in the Historic Hearts collection that I have plots for, as well as a contemporary romance I’ve been thinking about for a few years. But my immediate plans involve a short story collection, going back to the Kindred Spirits world, exploring some new places, and meeting some new characters. I’ve started some of the research, and I’m really enjoying getting back to that set up.

Last, but not least: Can you give my readers one teaser from your book, which is featured here on my blog, please?
This is the opening of Chapter One, and I really hope you and your readers enjoy it!

Long Ridge, Northumberland, October 1471

The dark still wasn’t moving.
Meg Mathers stood at the window of the family’s bastle, trying to pick out any hint of movement, friend or foe, against the blue-black of the night, but there was none to be found. It had been hours since the men had ridden out – it couldn’t be much longer now. Without looking down, she polished the pewter dish in her hand once again; she didn’t know how many times she had cleaned it already that night, but she couldn’t stop. Just as she knew that behind her, Hannah Carstairs and Lizzie Wilkinson would be equally lost in equally meaningless repetition.
Behind each dot of light in the cottages beyond the enclosure’s defensive wall, it would be the same. The women, the old, the young and the infirm, each finding their own way to pass the hours until fathers, husbands, brothers and sons were safely returned to them. None were aware of what they were doing; the cloth in Meg’s hand could rub away to nothing and the fact wouldn’t have registered. At least it felt productive.
As much as Meg hated seeing them go on each raid, it was a necessity this time. One more failed try, and the dreaded possibility of over-winter starvation might just become their reality. Meat was already running low.
She kept staring into the dark.

Isn’t that a great reason to pick up this book and to find out more?!
Thanks once again for this lovely interview, Jennifer Wilson.

Giveaway :

Win 2 x e-copies of The Last Plantagenet? (Open Internationally)

1YkrxUzA*Terms and Conditions – Worldwide entries welcome. Please enter using the Rafflecopter box below. The winner will be selected at random via Rafflecopter from all valid entries and will be notified by Twitter and/or email. If no response is received within 7 days then Rachel’s Random Resources reserves the right to select an alternative winner. Open to all entrants aged 18 or over. Any personal data given as part of the competition entry is used for this purpose only and will not be shared with third parties, with the exception of the winners’ information. This will passed to the giveaway organiser and used only for fulfilment of the prize, after which time Rachel’s Random Resources will delete the data. I am not responsible for despatch or delivery of the prize.

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The Magic of Wor(l)ds

 

 

 

P.S. Are you an author (or publisher) who also wants a FREE interview like this? You can always contact me via e-mail!

 

 

#BlogTour #RachelsRandomResources @rararesources / #QandAs : Outreach – Shelly Berry @ShellyBerryUK @BookGuild

– ‘The Magic of Wor(l)ds’ blog is a hobby, reviews and other bookish stuff on this site are done for free. –

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Today I’m on the ‘Outreach’ blogtour, organised by Rachel’s Random Resources.
To promote this book I have a Q&As post, but before I let you read it first some ‘basic’ information.

About the Author :

hlBTIyoQShelly Berry lives in Waltham Forest, London. Having gained a BA Joint Honours Degree in Visual Art and Sociology at Keele University and a Diploma in Therapeutic Counselling, she has since worked in the public sector with vulnerable adults and children – including those affected by mental illness, drug and alcohol misuse, disability, criminal behaviour, homelessness and domestic and sexual abuse. During this time, Shelly developed and nurtured her love of writing. As well as writing fiction, she has previously written for a number of blogs and now writes for the Waltham Forest Echo.

Social Media Links:
Twitter
Facebook
Instagram

Synopsis :

RAk2An-AWhen Emily was offered a new job in London, she was sure that her life was about to change – new friends, a career in the big city and the boyfriend she always wanted.
Her new life turns out to be more complicated than she expected. Her flat mates don’t understand her. Her colleagues mock everything about her. Even her father doesn’t support her. The only person who offers her any encouragement is David.
He’s married. He’s her manager. To Emily it’s clear that they have something special. As their relationship develops, everyone seems to want to sabotage their chances.
But some things are meant to be…

Purchase Links:
Book Guild
Amazon UK
Amazon US

jHBBHoew

Q&A :

Hi

First of all thank you very much for taking the time to answer my questions, I really appreciate it. Here we go! 🙂
You’re welcome 🙂

Can you, for those who don’t know you already, tell something about yourself and how you became an author?
I started writing when I was about 6. My first “book” was called The Diamond Mistress. I think there was a sequel a year or two later followed by a long break before I began to write again. It started with a blog and a couple of night classes in my 20s around the time I began to develop my “just do it” attitude. It was this, sheer bloody mindedness and some strong organisational skills that produced a novel.

Which books did/do you love to read as a child/now as a grown-up?
I absolutely LOVED Roald Dahl as a kid, and still have a lot of his books! Nowadays I read a lot of books that relate to my work as a counsellor, but find getting stuck into a bit of Donna Tartt, Zadie Smith and of course Margaret Atwood a real luxury.

Is there a writer whose brain you would love to pick for advice? Who would that be and why?
I’d love to talk to any writer who could advise me how to carve out a sustainable career in the field, but would probably choose someone like Margaret Atwood who’s not only immensely successful but a writer I greatly admire. She’s been in the business for a long time and never seems to compromise on her individuality as a writer.

If you could, which fictional character (from your own book(s) or someone else’s) would you like to invite for tea and why?
Bridget Jones – we share the same birthday and a lot of the same hang ups. We’d probably get a little bit tipsy together whilst we put the world to rights. I’d probably end up offering to go on Sit Up Britain for her!

Do you have some rituals or habits whilst writing?
My writing rituals really depend on where I am. I work full time so squeeze in my writing whenever I can. I often spend train journeys with my laptop out, my headphones in and an Americano to hand. I’ve been known to write in the pub too – I love writing outside but don’t have a garden at present, so beer gardens are a favourite. As the afternoon progresses the coffee is usually replaced with wine.

Where do you come up with your idea(s)? Do people in your life need to be worried? 😉
Ha! I suppose people are my main inspiration. I’ve worked in the public sector since I graduated and have met a huge variety of people from different backgrounds, with different problems in different situations. I find myself pondering why people behave the way that they do and my stories stem from there…

Are you a plotter or do you go with the flow, as a pantser?
I plot out my stories using post-it notes – that way if the plot meanders in an unexpected direction, it’s easier to re-jig the rest of the storyline! I like to know where my writing is going, but I’m not scared to let it take its own course if that feels right.

Can you give novice writers some tips (do’s/don’ts)?
I think it’s really useful to go on some writing courses and read some books and publications like Mslexia to help get you started – but at the same time, don’t let them take away your own voice. And keep going – the more you write, the better your writing will become. I swear by diarising writing time, setting myself a target, and keeping going, even if I think what I am writing is drivel. Quite often when I read it back, it isn’t as bad as I thought it would be!

What are your futureplans as an author?
I’m currently writing a series of short stories I intend to amalgamate into a novel. It’s about a group of people whose paths cross on a housing estate in central London riddled with crime and “anti-social behaviour.” Watch this space…

Last, but not least : Can you give my readers one teaser from your book, which is featured here on my blog, please?
Page 204 – Eric offers Emily some advice about her relationship with manager that she doesn’t want to hear…

“Just a sec, Emily. A quick word, if I may?” As Eric’s fingers curled around my arm, I knew that I couldn’t escape – pretending I didn’t hear him would be one thing, but pulling away from his grip, however unwelcome, wasn’t really an option. I took a deep breath and turned towards him.
“Yes?”
I couldn’t keep my contempt from my voice. I knew he was the service manager and that I should show him due respect, but I couldn’t help but be repulsed by his touch and annoyed at his interference. He took a breath then hesitated, scrutinising me again with those tiny eyes. Eventually he exhaled loudly.
“Look, Emily, I’m not saying this to be deliberately difficult, or trying to patronise you, but I’ve seen the way you are around David and I can only conclude that you’ve developed an interest in him beyond his position as your manager.”
My mouth dropped open. I couldn’t believe what the ruddy, bulbous man in front of me was saying. Thankfully the cold prevented my blush from developing.
“I-I’m not sure that’s any of your business,” I stammered, lifting my chin defiantly. Eric shrugged.
“Well, I think that it is. At the end of the day, you and David work for a service I manage and I am your boss. And experience tells me that any emotional entanglement will just make things messy for everyone involved. Besides,” he continued, “I’m very fond of David and don’t want to see him getting into bother, at work or at home.”
I looked down at my feet and clasped my hands in front of me. Anger and embarrassment pulsed through me. I looked over at the door with longing before returning my gaze to my lecturer.
“Is that all?” I enquired, desperate to keep any emotion out of my voice.
“Not quite.” Eric met my gaze easily. “Emily, David is a wonderful man, and young enough to still be very attractive.” His chuckle made me want to scream. “But he’s also quite insecure at the moment, and the attentions of a young lady like yourself are no doubt incredibly flattering and doing his bruised ego the world of good. But he’s married, Emily. And a father.”
Eric’s grip on my arm tightened as he uttered the two words I really didn’t want to hear. I looked down at his hand, resentful of its part in reminding me of the stark reality of my situation. Our situation.
“Despite the difficulties he’s facing with these facts right now, I know that he loves his wife and his children dearly and nothing, or no one, is going to change that.” Eric’s free hand grasped my other arm. I looked at his round face, too fat to show the telltale lines of his age, and felt nothing more than hate. “Emily, do you understand?”
I clamped my teeth together and looked down at the slippery decking. There was no point arguing with this idiot of a man. He was wrong, so wrong, but too full of his own self-importance to be able to ever admit it. I nodded.
“Good. Now, I’m sorry if I’ve been harsh with you, but, well, I’ve been young too, believe it or not, and know how much these situations can screw with you if you let them. And I wouldn’t wish that on anyone. Okay?”
When I looked up at him he was smiling, his jowls wobbling with the effort. I forced a smile in return. He exhaled loudly through his nose as he released my arm.
“Good. Now, shall we go back inside so I can buy you a drink? Maybe a lemonade or something to sober you up a bit?” He chuckled again. My expression remained fixed on my face, my smile frozen. I didn’t trust myself to respond. Instead, I let him lead the way back into the pub and to the table of inebriated support workers.
When Jim told me David had gone home, I swallowed down my disappointment with a mouthful of the sticky Coke Eric smugly handed me.

Isn’t that a great reason to pick up this book and to find out more?!
Thanks once again for this lovely interview, Shelly Berry.

Giveaway :

Win – 5 x PB copies of Outreach (UK Only)
*Terms and Conditions – UK entries welcome. Please enter using the Rafflecopter box below. The winner will be selected at random via Rafflecopter from all valid entries and will be notified by Twitter and/or email. If no response is received within 7 days then Rachel’s Random Resources reserves the right to select an alternative winner. Open to all entrants aged 18 or over. Any personal data given as part of the competition entry is used for this purpose only and will not be shared with third parties, with the exception of the winners’ information. This will passed to the giveaway organiser and used only for fulfilment of the prize, after which time Rachel’s Random Resources will delete the data. I am not responsible for despatch or delivery of the prize.

a Rafflecopter giveaway

The Magic of Wor(l)ds

 

 

 

P.S. Are you an author (or publisher) who also wants a FREE interview like this? You can always contact me via e-mail!

 

A Bottle of Rum – Steve Goble @Steve_Goble , an #Interview #QandA @samijolien @KayePublicity @SeventhStBooks ⁩

– ‘The Magic of Wor(l)ds’ blog is a hobby, reviews and other bookish stuff on this site are done for free. –

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Today I’m not on a blogtour, but doing my own interview with Steve Goble, author of ‘A Bottle of Rum’, to promote this book.
Before I let you read my Q&As, I’ll first post some ‘basic’ information.

About the Author :

Steve Goble BWSteve Goble writes historical mysteries. He is the author the Spider John Mysteries, which combines his love of swords, pirates and murder to follow a pirate detective on water and land. A BOTTLE OF RUM (Nov. 12, 2019; Seventh Street Books) is the third installment in the series.
A former journalist, Goble now works in communications for a cybersecurity firm as a digital forensics analyst. Goble helps examiners analyze evidence from computers and smartphones to help resolve a variety of civil and criminal cases.
Goble also writes fantasy, horror, science fiction and poetry. An avid craft beer lover, he previously authored a column called “Brewologist”, which appeared on USA Today Network-Ohio, where he resides.

Website
Facebook
Twitter
Goodreads
Blog

Synopsis :

A BOTTLE OF RUM (A Spider John Mystery #3)
Seventh Street Books — November 12, 2019
Paperback: $15.95
Kindle: $9.99
ISBN: 978-1645060031

A Bottle of RumAugust, 1723 — Spider John Rush believes he has escaped piracy forever. Enjoying rum and chess in a dark Lymington tavern, he dreams of finding passage to Nantucket to reunite with his beloved Em and to finally get to know the son he remembers only as a babe in arms, though the lad must be dreaming of going to sea himself by now. But when a lazy taverner is stabbed to death, one glance at the victim tells Spider the pirate life has followed him ashore and he cannot possibly ignore this bloody crime. The wise maneuver would be to run before authorities arrive, but Spider is denied that choice because he’s already deeply, connected to the crime—he fashioned the murder weapon with his own hands.
The knife was a gift to a young man, one who ran off with the notorious Anne Bonny before Spider could drag him into a respectable life.
Soon, Spider John and his ancient shipmate Odin are dodging accusations and battling smugglers on a trail that leads to a madhouse where patients are dying one by one. Spider finds himself tangling with a horribly maimed former shipmate, vengeful pirates, a gun-wielding brunette, a death-obsessed young woman, a sneaky farmhand and a philosopher engaged in frightening experiments. But death seems to be winning at Pryor Pond, and the next life lost may be the one Spider desperately wants to save.
Spider must brave sharp steel, musket balls, gunpowder bombs, dangerous women and gruesome surgery if he is to find his foolish young friend alive and try once again to put piracy in their past.

Q&A :

Hi

First of all thank you very much for taking the time to answer my questions, I really appreciate it. Here we go! 🙂

Can you, for those who don’t know you already, tell something about yourself and how you became an author?
I grew up as an avid reader who loved murder mysteries and sea adventures. “The Hound of the Baskervilles” and “Mutiny on the Bounty” are two books that I loved and that made me want to be a storyteller, too. At some point, it occurred to me that I could write stories that blend my love of pirates and detectives, and soon I was writing the Spider John novels. I landed an agent, Evan Marshall, who thought I was on to something, and he found a publisher who thought maybe I was on to something, too. Time will tell whether any of us were correct about that … .

Which books did/do you love to read as a child/now as a grown-up?
I mentioned two crucial books above, but I also love Rex Stout, Alexandre Dumas, Rafael Sabatini, Patrick O’Brian, Mark Twain, J.R.R. Tolkien, Fritz Leiber, Robert L. Heinlein, Ursula K. LeGuin, Robert E. Howard, Raymond Chandler, Jane Austen and many others. I am coming to it rather late in life, but I also am developing a stronger appreciation for Agatha Christie these days.

Is there a writer whose brain you would love to pick for advice? Who would that be and why?
If only there was a way I could sit down with Twain for a day … .

If you could, which fictional character (from your own book(s) or someone else’s) would you like to invite for tea and why?
Hmmmm, first, let’s talk beer and whiskey, not tea. As for the guest, I think Simon Templar (The Saint, created by Leslie Charteris) would be about as entertaining as they come. Imagine the stories he could tell!

Do you have some rituals or habits whilst writing?
I write at my roll-top desk, which belonged to my father, in our living room. On the wall above me is a huge Godzilla poster, because I married a woman who is cool with that sort of thing. On top of the desk are four Leslie Charteris hardbacks I received as a Christmas gift, along with a baker’s dozen of Mark Twain’s works. Desk toys surrounding me include Conan the Barbarian, Doctor Strange, Cthulhu, the Balrog, a handful of Buddhas, and Spock. On the desk is a shot glass featuring Twain’s visage. I am a weird person.
As far as rituals, the only one I follow is this: I refuse to sit down to write until I have thought my way through the next chapter or scene. I won’t stare at my iPad wondering what to write. I think it through while mowing grass or daydreaming or whatever, and I hit the keyboard once I know what I am going to do. Of course, the plan often changes once I start tapping keys, but … I don’t stare at a blank screen wondering what to do.

Where do you come up with your idea(s)? Do people in your life need to be worried? 😉
I do occasionally steal a quirk from someone I know in real life and give it to a character in my books, but I never model a character after a real person. As far as the genesis of ideas goes, it’s really just me dipping a ladle into a great stew of ideas and notions derived from reading, following the news, observing people, etc. I start with characters and motivations — and that’s for my protagonist, my villains and my minor characters. I need to know all those before I begin. Then, I choose a starting point and go from there, guided entirely by what I think those characters would do based on what they know and what motivates them. It occasionally means I have to work harder at plotting, because one character or another stubbornly refuses to behave in a way that makes my life easier, but I honestly see that as a sign that my characters are very human. They don’t serve my needs. I serve theirs.

Are you a plotter or do you go with the flow, as a pantser?
I think I kind of answer that above, right? I do have a plot in mind: Here are the characters, here is what starts the story rolling, here is where it ends, with justice done (or not) and Spider John explaining it all as best as he can. But I don’t have a serious outline at the outset, and if the events of Chapter Three mean that a character will respond in a certain manner that gives me fits in Chapter Four, then, by thunder, I will just have to rethink Chapter Four. I think it is far mor important to let my characters do what they wish to do than to make them adhere to my preconceived notions. So … I guess I am a partial plotter who is willing to be a partial pantser.

Can you give novice writers some tips (do’s/don’ts)?
Don’t chase trends. I see people try to figure out what publishers want, and then try to write to that. I don’t think that pays off, or results in the best work. Write the stories that appeal to you, the stories only you can write. Then your passion will show through, and someone will notice. Do that and trust you will find your audience.
Tip number two is this: Find good test readers who love you enough to tell you what doesn’t work. They will make you better.

What are your future plans as an author?
I plan more Spider John books, and I am working on a modern-day detective series set in rural Ohio.

Last, but not least : Can you give my readers one teaser from your book, which is featured here on my blog, please?
Let’s just say that readers of the first two books who wonder what happened to Hob, Spider’s young friend, will find out.

Isn’t that a great reason to pick up this book and to find out more?!
Thanks once again for this lovely interview, Steve Goble.

The Magic of Wor(l)ds

 

 

 

P.S. Are you an author (or publisher) who also wants a FREE interview like this? You can always contact me via e-mail!

 

 

#5DayMiniBlitz #RachelsRandomResources @rararesources / #QandAs : Brad Was Sad – M. C. Goldrick

– ‘The Magic of Wor(l)ds’ blog is a hobby, reviews and other bookish stuff on this site are done for free. –

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Today I’m on the ‘Brad Was Sad’ blogtour, organised by Rachel’s Random Resources.
To promote this book I have a Q&As post, but before I let you read it first some ‘basic’ information.

About the Author :

OpBznNEgAward-winning author & mother of two, M.C. Goldrick sees feelings as our first language. Through her books she helps us identify and own our emotions. Her acclaimed Juvenile fiction series TIMEFLIES is an example of how stories can both enrich and entertain. She lives in Ottawa, Ontario, Canada with her family.

About the Illustrator :

Rebecca Alexander, mother of two now-grown-up boys, is an accomplished artist with a private gallery. Her work has been featured on Canada Post Christmas Cards & stamps. She lives in St.Catharines, Ontario, Canada.

Social Media Links:
Website
Amazon US
Facebook
Instagram

Synopsis :

ZsVxUYhwDid Brad’s dad make him sad? Brad thought he had…until his dog, Plaid, proved he could choose his outlook & feel glad.
Kids learn best through stories. Empower your child to own their feelings with this beautifully illustrated picture book by award-winning author, M.C. Goldrick.
Brad’s dog Plaid shows him how to feel and deal with emotions. Though Brad is having a bad day, Plaid shows him that it’s in his power to choose his perspective and his feelings.

Purchase Links:
Amazon UK
Amazon US

Q&A :

Hi

First of all thank you very much for taking the time to answer my questions, I really appreciate it. Here we go! 🙂

Can you, for those who don’t know you already, tell something about yourself and how you became an author?
I have always written. As a child, I filled notebooks with everything I could imagine and as a teen expressed myself through poetry. As a young adult, I began a career working at IBM writing. Though I wrote every day I was bored silly. All my energy went to writing technical documentation and contracts. I found it very stifling and my creativity went on pause.
After I became a mother, I decided to stay at home with the kids and as I filled our days with activities such as playdough, painting and music my creative juices began flowing again.
I began writing a novel for adults, a fantasy adventure. It’s awesome but incomplete. It was sent to the back of the line. TIMEFLIES butted to the front. The inspiration for a trio of kids who magically time travel disguised as houseflies took over and the first book was complete in a matter of months. Since then I have been writing and navigating the other aspects of being an author in today’s world. It has been a rewarding learning experience.

Which books did/do you love to read as a child/now as a grown-up?
The Chronicles of Narnia & A Wrinkle in Time are well known ones that I loved and have reread with my children. One lesser known book is called The Root Cellar by Janet Lunn. I loved this book so much as a child that I have kept the paperback to share with them.

Is there a writer whose brain you would love to pick for advice? Who would that be and why?
Phillip K. Dick. A Sci-fi writer who passed in the ‘80’s. His books, his process and his personal experiences are fascinating.

If you could, which fictional character (from your own book(s) or someone else’s) would you like to invite for tea and why?
It would be endlessly entertaining to sip tea with the Mad Hatter from Lewis Carrol’s Alice in Wonderland. The March Hare and the Dormouse would have to be there as well. I think it would be a hoot to listen to their inane chatter as they moved from seat to seat trying to stuff the Dormouse into the pot.

Do you have some rituals or habits whilst writing?
I like to light a candle and turn on my salt lamp. I put on some soothing spa music and use an aromatherapy diffuser. Together they create an ambience of relaxation.

Where do you come up with your idea(s)? Do people in your life need to be worried? 😉
The ideas in my book float into my mind from the ethers. No, the people in my life need not worry. I am an excellent secret keeper. Want to hear some really juicy ones? Well too bad! I told you I’m very good at keeping things confidential!

Are you a plotter or do you go with the flow, as a pantser?
Go with the flow for sure! When I write, it’s as though I’m reading. I don’t know what’s going to happen next. Sometimes I get a preview and can plan ahead a bit but there are always various plot turns that I had no idea were coming.

Can you give novice writers some tips (do’s/don’ts)?
Yes. Do!
Do it. Just write.
Don’t write for anyone else. Don’t write for an outcome. Don’t write for a finished product, money, or acclaim. Write because you can and you love it. Then, no matter what comes from it, you got to have that lovely experience of flow.
Art is for the experience of emotion (energy in motion) not for a final product. That’s a bonus! And a bonus you get to share. If people love it and it enriches their lives, even better.
Make your writing a win-win and you can’t lose.

What are your future plans as an author?
I plan to keep on keeping on as long as it feels good.
I have a plethora of materials in other genres, completed or near completed, that I will be sharing. However, I plan on using different pen names to differentiate the genres. M.C. Goldrick is a pen name I choose for children’s books. My maternal clan are the McGoldrick’s. There are a lot of jokers and storytellers in my family and I leapt at the opportunity to use their name for my books.

Last, but not least : Can you give my readers one teaser from your book, which is featured here on my blog, please?
I would love to! A rhyme that I’ve gotten a lot of positive feedback on is:
“Never again will I vow to disallow my inner WOW!”
xThe main character, Brad, says this when he realizes he has the power to choose his outlook. Earlier in the story his sister complained and plugged her ears in response to his singing. Her reaction caused him to vow to never sing again.
I think we can all relate to this experience. Most of us, at one time or another have internalized another’s negativity. We can take someone’s opinion and allow it to squash our self-expression.
Teachers critiquing my work as a child made me afraid to share. Not just my writing, but any kind of art. As an adult I felt inadequate, it took a lot of personal growth to step into the courage needed to become a published author.
Bad reviews were a challenge. The first one really took the wind out of my sails. But only for a minute. I choose to brush them off and keep connecting with the inner WOW!
I am using my author platform to nurture that WOW connection. Last year, my publisher, MotherButterfly Books began creating the Imagine-All Anthologies. This is a project that is close to my heart. In fourth grade, I had a poem published in an anthology. I think that validation helped to keep me writing. We want to bring that experience to more children. However, this is no contest. There are no judges. This is to encourage expression and celebrate creativity. Imagine-ALL is still in its infancy but as we receive submissions it will grow into a beautiful way to foster the artists of the future.

Isn’t that a great reason to pick up this book and to find out more?!
Thanks once again for this lovely interview, M. C. Goldrick.

The Magic of Wor(l)ds

 

 

 

P.S. Are you an author (or publisher) who also wants a FREE interview like this? You can always contact me via e-mail!

 

#BlogTour #RachelsRandomResources @rararesources / #QandAs : XYZ – William Knight @_William_Knight

– ‘The Magic of Wor(l)ds’ blog is a hobby, reviews and other bookish stuff on this site are done for free. –

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Today I’m on the ‘XYZ’ blogtour, organised by Rachel’s Random Resources.
To promote this book I have a Q&As post, but before I let you read it first some ‘basic’ information.

About the Author :

KzdAN71gWilliam Knight is British born writer and technologist currently living and working in Wellington, New Zealand. He’s chased a portfolio career which began in acting, progressed to music, flirted with handbag manufacturing and was eventually wired into technology in the late nineties.
“I had my first feature published in Computing magazine back in 2003 and subsequently wrote about the many successes and failings of high-tech for the Guardian, Financial Times and the BBC among many others publications. I now work as an IT consultant, and write blistering content for technology firms 🙂 ” says William.
The Donated (formerly Generation), his debut novel and a Sci-tech Thriller, started in 2001 and was ten years in development. XYZ, “A mid-life crisis with a comic vein”, took far less time. “But I think it’s funnier and better. Yay. Jazz hands!”

Social Media Links:
Facebook
Website
Twitter

Synopsis :

gGuHX4_AJack Cooper is a depressed, analogue throwback; a cynical, alcoholic Gen-Xer whose glory days are behind him. He’s unemployed, his marriage has broken down, he’s addicted to internet hook-ups, and is deeply ashamed of his son Geronimo, who lives life dressed as a bear.
When Jack’s daughter engineers a job for him at totally-lit tech firm Sweet, he’s confronted by a Millennial and Zoomer culture he can’t relate to. He loathes every detail – every IM, gif and emoji – apart from Freya, twenty years his junior and addicted to broadcasting her life on social media.
Can Jack evolve to fit in at Sweet, or will he remain a dinosaur stuck in the 1980s? And will he halt his slide into loneliness and repair his family relationships?
XYZ is for every Gen-Xer who ever struggled with a device, and for everyone else who loves emojis … said no one ever.

Purchase Link:
Amazon US
Amazon UK

Q&A :

Hi

First of all thank you very much for taking the time to answer my questions, I really appreciate it. Here we go! 🙂

Can you, for those who don’t know you already, tell something about yourself and how you became an author?
I have this dog, called Ludo. He’s a black and white border collie but is far too big and we suspect he’s got some greyhound genes or perhaps giantism. Anyway, he has his rituals, like cleaning himself between 6 and 7 in the morning, digging holes, walks, and he stands on the balcony at twilight and barks at the neighbours. I suspect most writers have something of the ludo in them. We have our rituals; we get ideas in our heads and regardless of how daft or pointless, we get them out on a PC and turn them into books. It’s simply in the genes. I am Ludo, he is me.

Which books did/do you love to read as a child/now as a grown-up?
I was asked to compile a list of all the books I’d read in a year for my English teacher when I was 11. I can still remember that list, because it gave me great anxiety ove whether Asterix and Obelix counted as books (their picture/comic books you see). I wanted to get the numbers up to seem like an avid reader but I spent so much time trawling for comic gems in those Gosciny and Urdezo classics that the only other thing on the list were a couple of Moominpapas and a Secret Seven. I did include them, I still do. I love Asterix.

Is there any writer whose brain you would love to pick for advice? Who would that be and why?
Robert Persig, the writer of Zen and the art of motorcycle maintenance. I don’t think the book is a particular example of literaryness (is that a word?) but the thinking that has gone into it and the concepts for a happy life are genius. I’d like to sit down with Robert, over a lovely vegetarian meal and a glass of Kombucha, to discuss life the universe and everything. Art is the root of all logic.

If you could, which fictional character (from your own book(s) or someone else’s) would you like to invite for tea and why?
Well I certainly wouldn’t invite Jack Cooper from XYZ to dinner without watering him down with some others. Like Victor Meldrew, he’s hilarious but can be terrifying with his truthful but cynical views of the world. Sometimes you just need to forget that it’s all fu**ed up. Don’t you?
So who else? Rob Gordon from Nick Hornby’s High Fidelity. He’s cynical too, but a little less political and moany than Jack. I’d invite him to dinner for a few rounds of the CD game (choosing your personal desert island discs) and discussions on famous break ups.

Do you have some rituals or habits whilst writing?
I like to write in a meditative state – sounds pretentious, but it’s not as bad as all that — let me explain. I write using a Pomodoro, which is a tomato shaped timer that marks each second with a satisfying low-frequency tick-tock. It ticks for 25 mins during which time you focus utterly on writing – no distractions, no Twitter or FB, no research or looking up baby-names and no disturbances that you can control (earth quakes are okay). It’s lovely. You get into this flowling zone of writingness, and it’s become a habit. I look forward to sitting down and turning the timer on. I just, well, chill.

Where do you come up with your idea(s)? Do people in your life need to be worried? 😉
Ha ha. Most definitely they should worry, but only about politics and climate change. My ideas come from my experiences and my interests in science/technology. There’s always a strong thread of cautionary tale in my work as I wrestle with the benefit-risk balance of some idea or other. My first book, The Donated (Generation), is about science gone wrong resulting in an epidemic of people coming back to life as they regenerate, and the most recent book XYZ is about the social dangers of our addictions to devices and the internet. You may not realise these books are connected, but they are.

Are you a plotter or do you go with the flow, as a pantser?
As in go by the seat of my pants? Well, I’m a panster-plotter. At my best, I write first drafts with little planning and lots of panstering, but I then map out the story, get the hero’s journey going, add and delete scenes and make the whole thing hang together. I work with a structural editor to do this.

Can you give novice writers some tips (do’s/don’ts)?
Sit. Write. Focus. Leave the internet alone.

What are your futureplans as an author?
Ludo (my dog) figures strongly in my life at the moment so I think I want to weave him into some story about a middle-aged man suffering from imposter syndrome. You see a dog thinks it’s human more than it thinks it’s a canine, so your average dog is a perfect character with which to explore this idea, because for all it’s humanity, it still digs for bones and barks at birds – it must annoy itself, but it can’t help it. Like us. We do stuff that reflects our animalism, and yet we know we shouldn’t or know better – we just can’t help it sometimes.

Last, but not least : Can you give my readers one teaser from your book, which is featured here on my blog, please?
Jack Cooper’s problems stem from the youthful hope he fostered as a young computer programmer. In this brief extract, we hear him think of his disappointment in a career that promised so much but delivered (in his eyes) so little.

I was part of a small wave of silicon-brained cool kids that was destined to become a tsunami. My generation was going to make the world a better place and in record time. We had ideas of perfect information, total transparency, evidence-based-government and university for all. We were the builders of Utopia and the founders of global prosperity. We were Gods.
And it was fun. Fun to spend 10p on a video game and bash the console into submission. Fun to program pretty patterns on a screen and load games from a floppy disk, and fun to be part of the BBC’s Micro Live phenomenon, when the broadcaster sponsored its own computer as part of its remit to educate the masses.
And it remained fun until it became a trap, when computers ceased to be the promise of progress and instead became the terrorists of truth. Somewhere along the way, I turned from God of Silicon to an anorak-wearing dweeb, and from dweeb to a lonely fifty-five-year-old bastard. One at the end of his career, hopelessly out of touch, and unable to operate his own phone.

Isn’t that a great reason to pick up this book and to find out more?!
Thanks once again for this lovely interview, William Knight.

Giveaway :

Win $10 Amazon voucher and a signed copy of XYZ (Open INT)
*Terms and Conditions – Worldwide entries welcome. Please enter using the Rafflecopter box below. The winner will be selected at random via Rafflecopter from all valid entries and will be notified by Twitter and/or email. If no response is received within 7 days then Rachel’s Random Resources reserves the right to select an alternative winner. Open to all entrants aged 18 or over. Any personal data given as part of the competition entry is used for this purpose only and will not be shared with third parties, with the exception of the winners’ information. This will passed to the giveaway organiser and used only for fulfilment of the prize, after which time Rachel’s Random Resources will delete the data. I am not responsible for despatch or delivery of the prize.

a Rafflecopter giveaway

The Magic of Wor(l)ds

 

 

 

P.S. Are you an author (or publisher) who also wants a FREE interview like this? You can always contact me via e-mail!