#BlogTour #RachelsRandomResources @rararesources / #PromoPost : The Bellhop Only Stalks Once – Cat Hickey @CatHickey4 @darkstrokedark @crookedcatbooks

– ‘The Magic of Wor(l)ds’ blog is a hobby, reviews and other bookish stuff on this site are done for free. –

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Today I’m on the ‘The Bellhop Only Stalks Once’ blogtour, organised by Rachel’s Random Resources.
To promote this book I have a some ‘basic’ information for you.

About the Author :

uAW8HjNMCat Hickey has a Master’s degree in Biology, and teaches Anatomy and Physiology at a university in Baltimore, MD, USA. She writes light-hearted mysteries and thrillers that are based, partly, on her extensive travels around the world. She is also an avid yogi who teaches aerial yoga and practices aerial circus arts, and spends the rest of her time with her four rescue animals, which consist of three cats and a horse.

Social Media Links:
Facebook
Twitter

Synopsis :

xFDPVovILies, secrets, and a sinister plot hide in broad daylight at the heart of the Club Pacifica.
A beautiful tropical resort, exciting new friends, and a handsome guest liaison – it’s the perfect getaway for Chloe, a free-spirited Baltimore girl just getting to know herself. But the vacation of a lifetime quickly takes a dark turn when a young, overly flirty bellhop starts following her everywhere. It gets even worse when he disappears, and Chloe is the sole witness.
As bellhop after bellhop goes missing, she struggles to figure out what’s happening. When suspicion falls upon her, Chloe must not only try to rescue the kidnapped bellhops, but also to clear her name.
Complicating things further is the relationship she forms with Mateo, Club Pacifica’s guest liaison. Charming and easygoing, he is everything that her fiancé at home is not, and she finds herself fighting a growing attraction to him. But can he be trusted?
She soon discovers that she’s landed herself in a world of secrets, and, worse, that these are not just those of others, but also the secrets she keeps from herself.
Can she find her way through all the lies to finally discover the truth before it’s too late?

Purchase Link

The Magic of Wor(l)ds

#BlogTour #RachelsRandomResources @rararesources / #Review : Murder Ahoy! (The Bella Tyson Mysteries Book 2) – Fiona Leitch @fkleitch

– ‘The Magic of Wor(l)ds’ blog is a hobby, reviews and other bookish stuff on this site are done for free.
I’m grateful of receiving a free copy from the publisher/author in exchange for an honest review of this book. –

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About the Author :

x3C3jwjoFiona Leitch is a writer with a chequered past. She’s written for football and motoring magazines, DJ’ed at illegal raves and is a stalwart of the low budget TV commercial, even appearing as the Australasian face of a cleaning product called ‘Sod Off’. After living in London and Cornwall she’s finally settled in sunny New Zealand, where she enjoys scaring her cats by trying out dialogue on them. She spends her days dreaming of retiring to a crumbling Venetian palazzo, walking on the windswept beaches of West Auckland, and writing funny, flawed but awesome female characters. Her debut novel and first in the Bella Tyson series, ‘Dead in Venice’, was published by Audible as one of their Crime Grant finalists. Fiona is represented by Lina Langlee at the North Literary Agency.

Social Media Links:
Twitter
Website
Pinterest

Synopsis :

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Famous crime writer Bella Tyson is hired to co-host a Murder Mystery cruise, on a luxury liner sailing from Southampton to New York. She’s expecting an easy ride; fun and games, surrounded by amateur sleuths and fans of her books, all the while staying in a deluxe cabin and enjoying the spa and the amazing restaurants on board, culminating in a visit to one of her favourite cities in the world – the Big Apple.
She’s NOT expecting to be stuck on a boat in the middle of the Atlantic with her two least favourite people in the world, her hot but unfaithful bastard ex-husband Joel Quigley and fellow crime writer, bitch goddess and Twitter frenemy, Louise Meyers. And when real live dead bodies start turning up – as well as fake not-really-dead bodies – Bella’s dreams of being pampered on the high seas turn sour.
Accused of a murder she would have liked to commit but didn’t, and helped (or hindered) by a gang of unlikely detectives, can Bella find out who the real murderer is before the ship reaches its destination and New York’s finest drag her off?

Amazon

Review :

After reading ‘Dead in Venice‘ I was quite eager to read another book about Bella and Will, so when I got my hands on ‘Murder Ahoy!’ I was excited.
The first book may have had some issues, in my opinion at least, but this installment is just one straightforward great cozy mystery.
I mean, we have a setting to die for (I’m humming the theme song of ‘The Love Boat‘ by the way! 😉 ) and characters that are just very funny.
I definitely do love Bella and her inner conversations, she’s really a woman I can relate to, and of course I adore Will, he’s such a hero.
There are a bunch of other great characters too naturally, some of we already know and who I must confess started to grow on me, you readers know who I believe, so well done author.
Needless to say there were murders too, real and fakes ones, it was a murder mystery cruise by all means, but it all stayed rather ‘light’ now from my standpoint, which the first book was missing when it came to the ‘why’ part.
Anyway, back to ‘Murder Ahoy!’, which is one splendid read, full of great fun and sleuthing, which I definitely enjoyed reading as I couldn’t put this one down.
I patiently, ahum, await another book in this series so keep on writing Fiona Leitch!

The Magic of Wor(l)ds

#CoverReveal #RachelsRandomResources @rararesources : Mindworm – David Pollard @dpollardauthor

– ‘The Magic of Wor(l)ds’ blog is a hobby, reviews and other bookish stuff on this site are done for free. –

Today I’m super pleased to be on the blogtour, organised by Rachel’s Random Resources, to reveal the cover of

Mindworm - Cover Reveal

But first some information

About the Author :

book jacket photoAfter more than forty years of paid employment David Pollard retired to glorious Hereford and immersed himself in the theatrical activities of the county. He is currently Chair of Hereford County Drama Festival.
David sees himself as a teller of tales – he is a playwright, author of short stories and novels. He has a preference for dark and dystopian material. He is also an actor and theatrical director. Among the many authors admired by David is Robert Louis Stevenson – for his website David adopted the appellation Tuistala – Samoan for ‘Teller of Tales’ which the Samoan people called RLS.
Several of David’s plays have been published by Lazybee Scripts – one of which ‘Aspects of a Betrayal’ was shortlisted for the Kenneth Branagh prize at the Windsor Fringe Festival.
David has two works published on KDP/Amazon:
‘His Cat and Other Strange Tales’ – a collection of macabre short stories
‘The Alienation of Ludovic Weiss’ – a psychological thriller
A third book ‘Mindworm ‘ is scheduled for publication in September 2020
When not writing, directing or acting David runs a podcast platform for the streaming of radio plays and short story readings – Hand to Mouth Sound Theatre.
For relaxation David reads voraciously with a liking for history and thriller fiction. He also enjoys country walks of the strolling variety.

Social Media Links:
Twitter
Website

Synopsis :

The placid life of a college librarian is plunged into a desperate fight for survival  when he witnesses the death of his only friend. Suddenly he is forced to confront disturbing changes in his nature and appetites and their consequences. Suspected of murder and pursued by an implacable police detective he runs – but is he running from the law or from himself?

After this great teaser I hope you are still excited for the

blog-cover reveal

because this is happening

right now!

Mindworm front cover

Did this all pique your interest in reading the book? It will be available on September 1st, 2020, but you can already pre-order on Amazon UK and Amazon US.

The Magic of Wor(l)ds

#BlogTour #RachelsRandomResources @rararesources / #GuestPost : Resurrection Men – David Craig @SootyFeathers @elsewhenpress

– ‘The Magic of Wor(l)ds’ blog is a hobby, reviews and other bookish stuff on this site are done for free. –

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Today I’m on the ‘Resurrection Men’ blogtour, organised by Rachel’s Random Resources.
To promote this book I have a guest post written by its author, but before I let you read it first some ‘basic’ information.

About the Author :

aqPzD9lIAside from three months living on an oil tanker sailing back and forth between America and Africa, and two years living in a pub, David Craig grew up on the west coast of Scotland. He studied Software Engineering at university, but lost interest in the subject after (and admittedly prior to) graduation. He currently works as a strategic workforce planning analyst for a public service contact centre, and lives near Glasgow with his wife, daughter and two rabbits.
Being a published writer had been a life-long dream, and one that he was delighted to finally realise with his debut novel, Resurrection Men, the first in the Sooty Feathers series, published by Elsewhen Press in 2018. Thorns of a Black Rose was David’s second novel, also published by Elsewhen Press. He returns to the Sooty Feathers series with Lord of the Hunt.

Social Media Links:
Twitter
Facebook
GoodReads Blog

Synopsis :

1c4R8cLQGlasgow 1893.
Wilton Hunt, a student, and Tam Foley, a laudanum-addicted pharmacist, are pursuing extra-curricular careers as body snatchers, or ‘resurrection men’, under cover of darkness. They exhume a girl’s corpse, only for it to disappear while their backs are turned. Confused and in need of the money the body would have earnt them, they investigate the corpse’s disappearance. They discover that bodies have started to turn up in the area with ripped-out throats and severe loss of blood, although not the one they lost. The police are being encouraged by powerful people to look the other way, and the deaths are going unreported by the press. As Hunt and Foley delve beneath the veneer of respectable society, they find themselves entangled in a dangerous underworld that is protected from scrutiny by the rich and powerful members of the elite but secretive Sooty Feathers Club.
Meanwhile, a mysterious circus arrives in the middle of the night, summoned to help avenge a betrayal two centuries old…

Purchase Links:
Elsewhen Press
Amazon UK
Amazon US

Guest Post :

One of the challenges in writing fantasy is to show the readers a different ‘world’ (or different aspect of our world) with different rules, but still make it relatable to them.
Resurrection Men is a story with a lot of supernatural elements, and I wanted to balance it by grounding it heavily in reality. To do this, and to make it relatable to readers who don’t normally read fantasy, there were two elements I looked to; the world and the characters.
The story is mostly set in in Glasgow, 1893, a city where the rich live in large townhouses and country manors, and the poor live in squalid, overcrowded tenement flats crammed tightly together. My goal was to recreate Victorian Glasgow in all its splendour and squalor, using real places, many of which are still around today.
Among these places are the Southern Necropolis, a cemetery on the southern edge of Glasgow, and the northern Necropolis next to the Cathedral, a hill covered in gothic mausoleums. Several of the pubs are real, such as the Old Toll Bar, which has many of the fittings installed in the year this novel is set. I found it helped me create the world, to sit at the same spot in the bar where the protagonists sat, and imagine the bustle of pedestrians and horse-drawn trams outside. The stench of a city with a polluted river and dung-covered streets.
The Cathedral is about all that remains of medieval Glasgow, and the city council oversaw the demolition of much of Glasgow’s Victorian heritage during the 20th century, but some notable buildings remain. It’s worth recognising that many streets are named after people or places involved in the slave trade (Jamaica Street, Plantation, Kingston, Glassford Street among others), and that many of its notable citizens made their fortunes from that trade and the trades associated with it (tobacco, sugar and cotton).
Making the city as ‘authentic’ as I could was one half of grounding the story in realism; the second was to try and write the characters as three-dimensional, and to have them react realistically in dangerous situations, with their own motivations.
The main protagonists, Hunt and Foley, are men of questionable virtue. They make extra money on the side digging up freshly buried corpses and selling them to an anatomy professor. Both drink too much, and Foley’s depression and general dissatisfaction with his life is impacting his pharmacy shop.
I particularly wanted the characters to react appropriately in dangerous situations, to show them under the influence of fear and adrenalin. If you’ve ever been in a dangerous situation (i.e a fight or potential fight), you may recall the confusion and clumsiness if such a situation was new to you. Hunt is inexperienced in fighting and so he’s unsure how to act as fight or flight instincts war with one another. Foley is an ex-soldier with combat experience and responds more decisively.
I also wanted to show the impact fighting the undead has on the characters. The danger is new to Hunt and Foley, and over the course of the books they must decide whether to continue facing it. And learn, perhaps too late, whether or not that choice remains to them.
What would your choice be? To face going out night after night, to hunt and face the undead or their mortal servants, knowing death is a possibility each time – or turning a blind eye? In contrast to the young Hunt and Foley, the story also features Wolfgang Steiner and Lady Delaney, two veterans in the war against the undead.
Both have lost much and spent two decades fighting the undead. What toll would such a struggle take on them? When the rain falls and the wind howls at night, what drives Lady Delaney to go out in search of danger rather than sit next to a roaring fire with a book and a glass of wine in the relative safety of her home? After twenty years of such a life, I suspect she would not be entirely sane. Certainly, such misadventures in his youth took a heavy toll on Professor Sirk, another who years before learned of supernatural creatures and thought to fight them.
In Delaney, Steiner and Sirk, all of whom have suffered loss, do Hunt and Foley see their future if they stay involved in the supernatural world? This possibility will occur to them, more than once across the series.

The Magic of Wor(l)ds

 

#BlogTour #RachelsRandomResources @rararesources / #QandAs : A Good Match For The Major – Josie Bonham @BonhamJosie

– ‘The Magic of Wor(l)ds’ blog is a hobby, reviews and other bookish stuff on this site are done for free. –

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Today I’m on the ‘A Good Match For The Major’ blogtour, organised by Rachel’s Random Resources.
To promote this book I have a Q&As post, but before I let you read it first some ‘basic’ information.

About the Author :

twqKBEngJosie lives in the English midlands, surrounded by towns full of history such as Evesham, Stratford-Upon- Avon, Warwick and Worcester. Which is perhaps why her favourite reads are historical. Out of all the periods to choose from the Regency Era stirs her imagination the most. The true Regency lasted from 1811 until 1820 but dates as wide as 1789 to 1837 have been included in the extended Regency period. For Josie the true flavour of this period emerges after the iniquitous hair powder tax of 1795, unsurprisingly, scuppered the fashion for hair powder almost overnight.
Josie has always dabbled in stories but it took the combined efforts of her sister and eldest niece to set her on the path to writing novels. Her Regency romances, with a dash of adventure and intrigue, are the result.
There is more information on her website.

Social Media Links:
Twitter
Facebook

Synopsis :

_xYoPWtcPride meets prejudice – can love blossom?
Beautiful young widow, Lady Eliza Wyndham, is determined never to remarry after a disastrous first marriage. The undeniable attraction that fizzes between her and Major Nathaniel Overton terrifies her. She rejects his advances.
With his pride badly dented, Nat vows to forget Eliza until he finds her in danger from an old adversary of his army days. His protective instincts are stirred and he steps back into her life, but will Eliza be prepared to accept his help?

Purchase Link

Q&A :

Hi

First of all thank you very much for taking the time to answer my questions, I really appreciate it. Here we go! 🙂
It’s lovely to be here. Thank you very much for inviting me.

Can you, for those who don’t know you already, tell something about yourself and how you became an author?
I’ve always dabbled with storytelling and was often accused of daydreaming as a child. I would make up stories in my head when lessons got a bit slow. Later I would scribble the start of novels in notebooks but never finish them. That all changed when my sister persuaded me to do a free online course on creative writing with the Open University on Future learn. With encouragement from my sister and niece, who is also an author, and armed with a smattering of craft advice I decided to write a novel. Half way through I discovered the Romantic Novelists’ Association and was lucky enough to get a place on the New Writers’ Scheme. That gave me the push I needed.

Which books did/do you love to read as a child/now as a grown-up?
As a child I read everything I could get my hands on. My first reading adventure was Thomas the Tank Engine. I read most of the Enid Blyton books and was addicted to Rupert the Bear. I loved the Narnia books. Favourites of mine were Black Beauty, Anne of Green Gables, Little Women, the Chalet School Series, the Nancy Drew series and many more. When I ran out, I would read Mum’s books and so was introduced to authors like Jean Plaidy at a very early age. Later I developed a taste for Georgette Heyer, Jane Austen, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle and Wilkie Collins. Now I read historical and contemporary romance, romantic suspense, romantic comedy, contemporary and historical mystery, crime and cosy crime. It’s perhaps not surprising that my Regency Romances tend to have a good dash of mystery, suspense or even thriller in them.

Is there a writer whose brain you would love to pick for advice? Who would that be and why?
Susanna Gregory. Her Matthew Bartholomew medieval sleuthing series is absolutely brilliant. I would love to write a full on Regency mystery and some advice on how she builds her characters and keeps the pace of each story just right would be great.

If you could, which fictional character (from your own book(s) or someone else’s) would you like to invite for tea and why?
Oh, it would have to be Eliza Bennet from Pride and Prejudice. Such a clever girl and I’m sure she could tell me an awful lot about life in the Regency era.

Do you have some rituals or habits whilst writing?
Not really. I tend to be rather chaotic, although I like to claim it’s organised chaos. The jury is out on that one.

Where do you come up with your idea(s)? Do people in your life need to be worried? 😉
The slightest thing can spark me off. Being in the middle of an edit that needed finishing didn’t stop a post on the Regency Reader blog sparking a story idea that compelled me to write it down and even rough out the first page.
I don’t consciously use any details or characteristics of people I know but I had a shock when I realised the hero in my first completed manuscript had the exact same eye colour as my husband.

Are you a plotter or do you go with the flow, as a pantser?
I have strong pantser tendencies but I do like to do a rough plan of at least the beginning of a novel before I start writing. It changes a lot but it gets me on my way. I find that if there is a suspense subplot that does need a bit more prior planning. I also like to think about what makes my characters tick before I look for the best situations to put them in.

Can you give novice writers some tips (do’s/don’ts)?
Make sure you understand point of view and spend some time with your characters, it doesn’t have to be for long, before you start writing.

What are your future plans as an author?
I love writing Regency romance so I will carry on with that, starting with finishing the Reluctant Brides series. The new story idea may well spill over into a second series. I may also have a try at writing crime.

Last, but not least: Can you give my readers one teaser from your book, which is featured here on my blog, please?
Eliza has her future all mapped out. She flees to London with her sister to avoid the unsettling presence of Nat but he has promised to spend some time with an army friend – in London. Sparks fly when they meet and Eliza tries hard to persuade herself that Nat is just another fortune hunter. Anything is better than falling in love again, but is it already too late for Eliza to protect her heart?

Isn’t that a great reason to pick up this book and to find out more?!
Thanks once again for this lovely interview, Josie Bonham.

 

The Magic of Wor(l)ds

 

 

 

P.S. Are you an author (or publisher) who also wants a FREE interview like this? You can always contact me via e-mail!

 

#BlogTour #RachelsRandomResources @rararesources / #QandAs : Deadly Wishes – Rachel McLean @rachelmcwrites

– ‘The Magic of Wor(l)ds’ blog is a hobby, reviews and other bookish stuff on this site are done for free. –

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Today I’m on the ‘Deadly Wishes’ blogtour, organised by Rachel’s Random Resources.
To promote this book I have a Q&As post, but before I let you read it first some ‘basic’ information.

About the Author :

b1W-RY-QMy name’s Rachel McLean and I write thrillers that make you think.
What does that mean?
In short, I want my stories to make your pulse race and your brain tick.
Do you often get through a thriller at breakneck pace but are left with little sense of what the book was really about? Do you sometimes read literary fiction but just wish something would damn well happen?
My books aim to fill that gap.
If you’d like to know more about my books and receive extra bonus content, please join my book club at rachelmclean.com/bookclub. I’ll send you a weekly email with news about my writing research and progress, stories and bonus content for each book. And I’ll let you know when my books are on offer.

Social Media Links:
Twitter
Facebook
Instagram

Synopsis :

FRDFGMAkMeet Zoe Finch, West Midlands Police’s newest Detective Inspector. She’s outspoken, ambitious, and damaged. And she’s working a case that could make her career, or cost her everything…
Fresh from the success of the Canary investigation into depravity and corruption at the highest levels, Zoe has attracted attention. Not least from Assistant Chief Constable Bryn Jackson.
But when Jackson is brutally murdered on the night of his retirement party, Zoe is dragged into a case that’s deeply personal.
All the evidence points to the victim’s downtrodden wife, who has secrets of her own. But Zoe begins to suspect all isn’t as it seems. Could Jackson’s death be linked to the Canary case? And what is her new boss, DCI David Randle, hiding?
Seeking out the truth will force Zoe to confront her own past and put her career, and her team’s lives, on the line.

Purchase Links:
Amazon UK
Amazon US

Q&A :

Hi

First of all thank you very much for taking the time to answer my questions, I really appreciate it. Here we go! 🙂

Can you, for those who don’t know you already, tell something about yourself and how you became an author?
I’ve been writing since I was old enough to hold a pen! I loved writing stories in primary school but then had the creativity drummed out of me in secondary school and switched to more humdrum writing. In every job I’ve had I’ve been the person people go to when they need something written.
My first nonfiction book came out about ten years ago but have been working on fiction on the side, and published my first novel in 2018. Deadly Wishes is my first crime novel, and I thoroughly enjoyed writing about my home city of Birmingham for the first time.

Which books did/do you love to read as a child/now as a grown-up?
As I child I loved Nancy Drew – her mysteries always gripped me and were unputdownable. Now I love crime and thriller authors like Angela Marsons, JD Kirk and Sharon Bolton.

Is there a writer whose brain you would love to pick for advice? Who would that be and why?
I’d love to talk to Angela Marsons about her DI Kim Stone books and how she developed the character. Kim is so damaged but so strong, and I love reading about her.

If you could, which fictional character (from your own book(s) or someone else’s) would you like to invite for tea and why?
Definitely not David Randle, who is a lying DCI in my book! I guess I’d like to have a coffee with my protagonist DI Zoe Finch (she doesn’t drink tea, thinks it tastes like dishwater) and get to know her better.

Do you have some rituals or habits whilst writing?
I like to write at the library where I can’t be distracted – and I have a Spotify playlist, mainly classical, that I listen to, to get me into the zone.

Where do you come up with your idea(s)? Do people in your life need to be worried? 😉
Haha! No, they don’t. Ideas really aren’t an issue for me – they pop into my head and I carry a notebook everywhere to write them down. If they’re still going around in my head a few days later I’ll start developing them to see if they’re good enough to turn into a book. I currently have ideas for six more DI Zoe Finch books so finding the time is more of a challenge!

Are you a plotter or do you go with the flow, as a pantser?
Definitely a plotter. I prepare a detailed outline before I start writing, and it makes the writing so much easier.

Can you give novice writers some tips (do’s/don’ts)?
Don’t worry about how good your first draft is. It’s better to have something to edit than nothing at all. And learn how to craft a great story by writing lots of short stories. Creating a story that readers engage with is much harder than refining your prose, and isn’t given enough attention.

What are your future plans as an author?
I have ideas for at least six more Zoe Finch novels and am currently working on book 2, Deadly Choices. It’ll be out in September, on my 50th birthday. I thought it was as good a way to celebrate as any.

Last, but not least : Can you give my readers one teaser from your book, which is featured here on my blog, please?
This excerpt is from early in the book, when Zoe is searching the house of the victim, Assistant Chief Constable Bryn Jackson, for documents that might identify a suspect. She goes to a storage room and finds the victim’s wife, Margaret, also looking for something. Margaret leaves and then Zoe works though the boxes…

The letter at the back was on softer paper, not as yellow. It was only two weeks old. The writing was clear, in bright blue ink. Zoe thought of the woman downstairs writing this and hiding it so recently. She smoothed it out, the gloves numbing her fingers.
Zoe felt a flash of adrenaline course through her. She gripped the paper, then forced herself to relax her grip. Her breathing had picked up.
She straightened, hitting her head on the ceiling. She looked back towards the door. This was what Margaret Jackson had been looking for.

Isn’t that a great reason to pick up this book and to find out more?!
Thanks once again for this lovely interview, Rachel McLean.

 

The Magic of Wor(l)ds

 

 

 

P.S. Are you an author (or publisher) who also wants a FREE interview like this? You can always contact me via e-mail!

 

#BlogTour #RachelsRandomResources @rararesources / #PromoPost : The Dead Tell Lies – J F Kirwan @kirwanjf @Bloodhoundbook

– ‘The Magic of Wor(l)ds’ blog is a hobby, reviews and other bookish stuff on this site are done for free. –

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Today I’m on the ‘The Dead Tell Lies’ blogtour, organised by Rachel’s Random Resources.
To promote this book I have a some ‘basic’ information for you.

About the Author :

hBWryfeQJ. F. Kirwan is an insomniac who writes thrillers in the dead of night. He is also a psychologist, and has drawn upon this expertise, including being taught by a professor who examined serial killers for Scotland Yard, to pen the crime/mystery/thriller The Dead Tell Lies for Bloodhound Books. He wanted to shed light not only on the darkness of serial killers, but of those who track them down, who must inevitably step inside the serial killer’s worldview, and may not come out clean afterwards. He is also the author of the Nadia Laksheva thriller series for HarperCollins (66 Metres, 37 Hours and 88 North). His favourite authors include Lee Child, David Baldacci and Jo Nesbo. He is married, and has a daughter and a new grandson, and lives between Paris and London.

Social Media Links:
Website
Twitter
Facebook

Synopsis :

L7y5GuUIGreg Adams, a criminal psychologist at Scotland Yard, specialises in bringing serial killers to justice. He tracks down a spree serial killer nicknamed the Divine, who has already killed six teenage girls and is about to kill a seventh. Greg works out the location where he is hiding and joins a raid. The police capture the Divine and save the girl, but on the very same night, Greg’s wife is brutally murdered by another serial killer, known as the Dreamer.
A year later, unable to bring the killer to justice, Greg has quit his job and is ready to end it all, when he receives a phone call from a man who tells him the Dreamer is dead, and that he didn’t kill Greg’s wife, Kate.
Greg returns to Scotland Yard to work for Superintendent Chief Detective Donaldson in the hope he can re-examine the case with the help of two new detectives, Finch and Matthews.
As Greg delves into the case further, he becomes more convinced that the Dreamer wasn’t the man responsible for his wife’s murder.
But if it wasn’t the Dreamer, who was it?
In order to solve the mystery around his wife’s murder, Greg is going to have to delve even deeper into the mind of a terrifying psychopath. And this time he might not make it back in one piece…

Purchase Links:
Amazon UK
Amazon US

The Magic of Wor(l)ds

#BlogTour #RachelsRandomResources @rararesources / #GuestPost : Death Remembered – KE Coburn @KeCoburn

– ‘The Magic of Wor(l)ds’ blog is a hobby, reviews and other bookish stuff on this site are done for free. –

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Today I’m on the ‘Death Remembered’ blogtour, organised by Rachel’s Random Resources.
To promote this book I have a guest post written by its author, but before I let you read it first some ‘basic’ information.

About the Author :

2PxDxTS0K E Coburn lives by the seaside in Kent, England, and spends her time plotting murders and mayhem for her imaginary friends in the Sleuthing Club!
As well as having a master’s degree in history, she’s a huge fan of everything vintage, especially the 1950s, and loves researching this interesting period. Nothing makes her happier than looking at old photographs, drinking old-fashioned cocktails, and doing as little work as possible.
Her debut novel Death Remembered: A Sleuthing Club Mystery (Book 1) will be published in July 2020.
If you fancy keeping up to date with her murderous plots you can find her on Twitter, at her website and on Facebook.

Synopsis :

oapPi7CASummer 1952.
The sun is shining, the birds are singing, but Charity Nicholls is bored of her quiet life in a tiny English village where nothing ever happens. Other than her nagging, marriage-obsessed mother, all she has to fill the time are her dreams of becoming a writer, and the Sleuthing Club – the mystery-reading book club she attends every week.
But everything changes the day her father receives a poison pen letter.
With the help of the Sleuthing Club, particularly handsome Henry Taylor, Charity is determined to find the culprit. But when people start dying and the police arrive, led by the infuriating Inspector James Lawrence, her little village becomes a hotbed of crime.
Can Charity find the murderer before anyone else dies?

Purchase Links:
Amazon UK
Amazon US

Guest Post :

How do you plan a murder?!

Since I started telling people that I write cozy mysteries, the question I keep getting asked is, how do you plan a murder?
It’s not a question I ever thought I’d be asked and I’m quite relieved it’s not being asked by the police! Luckily though, the answer is far less sinister than the question and no actual weapons are involved. I plot a murder on a sheet of A3 paper with bubbles here, there and everywhere and lots of different coloured pens to write stuff down with.
Now, I’m not advocating anyone actually plotting to kill someone. For starters, it’s against the law and not the best way to settle your differences and also, my method is purely for writing fiction. I’m a real plotter, so I have quite extensive notes and plot outlines anyway, but it’s important for the story (and my sanity) to have it all figured out beforehand, otherwise I get very confused and then have to try and unpick the mess during edits. Trust me, that is not fun! However, when it comes to cozies and for the purpose of getting all the foundations in place before I start writing, I always begin with the victim.
By starting with a fun victim, I can figure out who they are, why they died and how. And most importantly who did it, so I can make sure I lead the reader away from them and towards other suspects until the very last minute! By doing it this way, I can create a list of clues that I add into the story and then pull all those details back together at the end when my sleuth does her big reveal.
The next thing to do, (in a different coloured pen!) is to move onto other suspects and their connection with the victim. This often leads to ideas for red herrings too. Every mystery has to have red herrings otherwise, what’s the point? If the sleuth gets everything right straight away there isn’t going to be much of a mystery and there’ll also be a very low word count!
One of my favourite things about plotting murders is then turning this ‘murder map’ on its head and noting how Charity, my sleuth, is going to approach it. This is where the investigation really becomes a story. It needs to be logical because no one likes a sleuth who just magically guesses stuff! So, from here I start building an idea of her step-by-step investigation. The story starts to come together as I realise where she needs to be at what point to uncover the clues and can decide how she’s going to get there.
I also need to include the Sleuthing Club too! They act kind of like sidekicks, giving Charity someone to bounce ideas off, but they also allow me, as a writer, to use them as plot devices to deliver red herrings or clues as well. There’s a lot of layering involved in writing a cozy mystery, especially one like the Sleuthing Club that uses golden age crime stories as reference points, and though they’re easy to read, it doesn’t mean they’re easy to write. At least, not for me!
That’s where plotting and planning your murder comes in and why my number one tip for writing a cozy mystery is to create yourself a murder map! (Plus, playing with coloured pens is always fun!)

The Magic of Wor(l)ds

#BlogTour #RachelsRandomResources @rararesources / #QandAs : Homeward Bound – Richard Smith @RichardWrites2

– ‘The Magic of Wor(l)ds’ blog is a hobby, reviews and other bookish stuff on this site are done for free. –

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Today I’m on the ‘Homeward Bound’ blogtour, organised by Rachel’s Random Resources.
To promote this book I have a Q&As post, but before I let you read it first some ‘basic’ information.

About the Author :

OfBnvHGcRichard Smith is a writer and storyteller for sponsored films and commercials, with subjects as varied as caring for the elderly, teenage pregnancies, communities in the Niger delta, anti- drug campaigns and fighting organised crime. Their aim has been to make a positive difference, but, worryingly, two commercials he worked on featured in a British Library exhibition, ‘Propaganda’.

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Synopsis :

LFkfpHNUHomeward Bound features 79-year-old grandfather George, who didn’t quite make it as a rock star in the ‘60s. He’s expected to be in retirement but in truth he’s not ready to close the lid on his dreams and will do anything for a last chance. When he finds himself on a tour of retirement homes instead of a cream tea at the seaside his family has promised, it seems his story might prematurely be over.
He finds the answer by inviting Tara, his 18-year-old granddaughter, to share his house, along with his memories and vast collection of records. She is an aspiring musician as well, although her idea of music is not George’s. What unfolds are clashes and unlikely parallels between the generations – neither knows nor cares how to use a dishwasher – as they both chase their ambitions.

Purchase Links:
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Amazon
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Q&A :

Hi

First of all thank you very much for taking the time to answer my questions, I really appreciate it. Here we go! 🙂

Can you, for those who don’t know you already, tell something about yourself and how you became an author?
Well, I’m in my eighth decade and the greater part of that has been spent making films. That’s meant TV commercials and documentaries and later, with my own company, public relations films, internal communications, education, training  . . . all sorts of things. The trick was always to find a new way to catch people’s imagination and give them a new perspective on what they may already think they know about. I used to joke it was propaganda until two of my films turned up in a major national exhibition called ‘Propaganda’! So I’ve written hundreds of scripts but I’d always wanted to write a novel, and it’s taken this long to free myself from writing for others to write for myself.

Which books did/do you love to read as a child/now as a grown-up?
I remember the librarians in my local children’s library would say, ‘What, back already?’ because I would devour Arthur Ransome and Wilkie Collins at a rate of knots. As a teenager, I remember my mother’s reaction when she saw me with Anthony Burgess’ The Wanting Seed that she must have thought unsuitable, and my secret copy of Lady Chatterley was discovered and taken from me. Then life, and 100% commitment to work, meant I became a summer holiday-only reader. That left me with a quick browse of the library before going away or at the airport, and it means I can end up reading almost anything. Not very helpful, I know but that’s how it is!

Is there a writer whose brain you would love to pick for advice? Who would that be and why?
I would listen to anyone because we all have stores to tell and experiences we can share and learn from. But advice? It’s dangerous to give and even more dangerous to follow! We have to follow our own instincts and take the chances when we can.

If you could, which fictional character (from your own book(s) or someone else’s) would you like to invite for tea and why?
The thing about fictional characters is that they all have character flaws and their own traumas. Why would I want them at a party? Anyway, they’ve got enough to contend with in their own stories, so they don’t want to be getting caught up in my real life dramas!

Do you have some rituals or habits whilst writing?
I discovered I need a discipline in order to get anything done. I need to get out of the house and away from distractions – preferably the Reference section of a library – with the succour of a coffee and Danish en route to get me started. And I will stay at work until my laptop battery dies – even if I’m composing using pen and paper (as I always do for first drafts). The computer battery is my time clock!

Where do you come up with your idea(s)? Do people in your life need to be worried? 😉
Ideas can come from anywhere any time. The starting point is invariably something I’ve witnessed or feel strongly about. But who experiences it depends on how I see the idea developing. From a germ of a story, I work out what character traits are necessary to make it believable. The characters then shape events and the events shape the character. Whatever characters I create, I always look back and ask myself, ‘Would I or would anyone react in this way? And if they would, what elements of their character do I need to make clear to the reader so that those reactions come across as genuine?’
Should anybody reading my book worry it’s about them? Not really. I want my characters to be real, and to be real I have to believe in them, so I’m inevitably going to be influenced by people and incidents I’ve experienced. The odd reaction, mannerism, figure of speech. But is any one character based on a single person? No. It’s my imagination extrapolating from life. If you think it’s you, it means I’ve succeeded in making the characters believable. But it isn’t you! Or me, before you ask!

Are you a plotter or do you go with the flow, as a pantser?
I have a beginning and an end when I start writing, with the outline of a lead character and maybe a couple of key incidents along the way, but what exactly will happen in order to get to the end, who he/she will meet on the way and how those characters will flesh out and develop, I don’t know at the outset. An editor, after reading my first three chapters, showed me the complex plot matrix from a major novel and suggested I did the same. I think she must have thought I hadn’t got a proper grip on the structure and direction for what I was writing. So I tried, for her, but I couldn’t do it. I find my characters grow as the story grows. Natural responses to incidents open up character traits I hadn’t considered at the start and those lead into consequences I might never have considered at the outset. So rather than shoe-horning characters into a structure, I have a basic outline and develop the characters to determine the route to the finish. We grow together! Plus as scenes unfold, I can sense where twists and suspense need to be added. I got that from making films. I used to watch the audiences at my rough cuts and see where were gripped and when they fidgeted, so understood ebb and flow. I can’t do that in advance when writing. Only as the action develops do I get a sense for when something needs to upset and challenge the characters!

Can you give novice writers some tips (do’s/don’ts)?
I’m still something of a novice writer. I have only Homeward Bound. So I’m not really in a position to be a sage. In that I came really late into writing a novel and had been doing a full-time job up until then, I suppose I can give some hope. I can sympathise with those trying to write and hold down a job. If it’s as demanding and full on as mine was, it’s almost impossible. In my experience, you need a concentrated period to write, without distractions. You have to live the events and the characters, and spending a day in the real world makes that almost impossible. Perhaps detach yourself for a couple of weeks – though if you have family and commitments, that’s hard too. So my only tip is not to give up, keep filing away those ideas, then when you get a chance to settle on writing, at least you have the material to hand. And I prepared myself when I knew I was close to really doing it by taking writing courses and looking for professional editorial services. An independent person to read what you’ve done is vital. Friends won’t want to do it – nor want to jeopardise your friendship by being brutal! Get a professional who can help you take it forward and ready to publish.

What are your future plans as an author?
Well, while I was writing Homeward Bound, I had another idea that I have now converted into a first draft, full manuscript. After I’ve done this blog I should go back to it and see if it’s any good! I’ll then spend the next six months rewriting it. And In the meantime, I woke up in the night with another idea that I’ve scribbled down on a notepad in the bathroom – I haven’t looked at it since but I’m hoping when I do, I can decipher it and it’ll make the germ of a third novel.

Last, but not least, can you give my readers one teaser from your book, which is featured here on my blog, please?

“Do I have to stop loving music because I’m old and decrepit?” seventy-nine year-old George asks his nineteen year-old granddaughter Tara. “I didn’t stop loving music when the sixties ended. The decade, or mine. Nothing’s new. Things get changed, sometimes improved.” He pauses before adding ruefully, “But not often.”

George’s daughter wants him to move to an old folks home, but he believes he’s too young, he can cope, and he has his music. He has been a musician all his life, but never made it to the big time. Tara is heading off to uni in London and lodging with her grandfather looks ideal. But can a uni student follow her course and have a social life under the subtle eye of her grandfather, who is getting frailer, even if he doesn’t like to admit it? Might they muddle through together?
Thus the stage is set for a tale of family, generational differences, deceit and music references!

Isn’t that a great reason to pick up this book and to find out more?!
Thanks once again for this lovely interview, Richard Smith.

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The Magic of Wor(l)ds

 

 

 

P.S. Are you an author (or publisher) who also wants a FREE interview like this? You can always contact me via e-mail!

#BlogTour #RachelsRandomResources @rararesources / #QandAs : Space Academy – Hannah Hopkins

– ‘The Magic of Wor(l)ds’ blog is a hobby, reviews and other bookish stuff on this site are done for free. –

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Today I’m on the ‘Space Academy’ blogtour, organised by Rachel’s Random Resources.
To promote this book I have a Q&As post, but before I let you read it first some ‘basic’ information.

About the Author :

0CRyZxf0In 2017, Hannah Hopkins released a self-published novel entitled ‘The Split’; the story of four teenagers navigating life after Earth as they journey through space to a new planet. Two years later, the book was picked up by ‘The Conrad Press’ and re-vamped as ‘Space Academy,’ with a new cover, new title and new additions to the story. ‘Space Academy’ was released in 2020, kickstarting Hannah’s career as a writer.
Hannah is currently busy writing a historical fiction novel with a feminist twist. She spends the rest of her time working at a University and caring for her two young children in the UK.

Social Media Links:
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Website

Synopsis :

Bp39T04kIt’s the year 2100. Earth is dying. A young woman, Elsie, has risked everything to get her newborn son, Will, aboard ‘The Mayflower’ – a spaceship that will transport a select number of people to a new planet they can call home. Elsie’s luck takes a turn when she discovers the captain of ‘The Mayflower’ is an old friend. He allows her to board with her son, giving them a place on the luxurious Floor One, where they live amongst the most honoured of ‘The Mayflower’s’ passengers.
Thirteen years later, and Will is ready to start school at Space Academy, an institute specialising in subjects such as Alien Studies, Technology, and Rocket Control. While a pupil there, Will starts to uncover secrets about his father’s death, becoming wrapped in a mystery that he and his friends must solve if they are to have any hope of saving humanity from the threat that lies in wait.
Lose yourself in this brilliantly addictive novel as it takes you on a journey through the stars. But be warned – you might be surprised by what you find.

Purchase Links:
Amazon UK
Amazon US

Q&A :

Hi

First of all thank you very much for taking the time to answer my questions, I really appreciate it. Here we go! 🙂
You are so welcome! Thank you for having me on your blog. 😊

Can you, for those who don’t know you already, tell something about yourself and how you became an author?
Of course! I am 25 years old and I have two small children, who take up a huge amount of my time. I work at a Creative Arts University, and their attitude towards all things creative means that I can take a notebook and write during any spare moment I get, which helps a lot with time management. I have always written ever since I could write! My first story was about an injured beetle in my grandmother’s garden. I named him “Dead-Legs.” I still have the story. I was very fortunate to be published by the Conrad Press with my book ‘Space Academy’, which was the first full-length novel I’ve ever written. I had many, many attempts before that which never made it. I really believe writing is a ‘learn by doing’ process.

Which books did/do you love to read as a child/now as a grown-up?
I loved the Harry Potter books and they shaped a huge part of my life growing up, as I think they did for most people of my generation. I also loved to read Jacqueline Wilson. The way she portrayed familial dysfunction through the eyes of a child was unique and incredibly perceptive. As a grown up, I am a big fan of the classics. I love anything where I read a sentence and do a double-take. Authors who are masters of their craft and can paint beautiful pictures with their words really take my breath away! The Great Gatsby is one of my all-time favourites. I think it’s the most beautifully written book I’ve ever read.

Is there a writer whose brain you would love to pick for advice? Who would that be and why?
If I could choose anyone living or dead, it would have to be Daphne Du Maurier! The way she builds suspense and creates mystery is fascinating to me. Her inclusion of setting as part of the narrative is also incredibly unique and wonderful. In ‘Rebecca’, the house ‘Manderlay’ is just as important as any of the characters, and becomes an intrinsic part of the story. I also love the way she wove early messages of feminism into her gripping narratives!

If you could, which fictional character (from your own book(s) or someone else’s) would you like to invite for tea and why?
Elizabeth Bennett from Pride and Prejudice is someone I would love to invite for tea. I relate to her a lot, and I feel if I had lived in the same period as her, I would be very much like her. Her wit would also make for a very entertaining tea party! If I was to choose from ‘Space Academy’, I would definitely invite Mr Krecher, the teacher of ‘Alien Studies’. I feel I would have a lot of questions to ask him about extra-terrestrials!

Do you have some rituals or habits whilst writing?
I have an old writing desk in my house, and I love sitting there in the evening while the sun sets through my big old-fashioned windows. I usually put relaxing music on in the background. Sujhan Stevens is my go to. His music is so calming but emotive. His lyrics are also like poetry, so it really gets my creative juices flowing. I can pass by many hours at that desk!

Where do you come up with your idea(s)? Do people in your life need to be worried? 😉
Haha! I would say my ideas come from a combination of things. I think all writers draw from experience, and I definitely draw the more emotional parts of writing from events that have happened to me, or things that I have thought about or felt. The concept of a novel usually comes to me in a more mysterious way. ‘Space Academy’ started from a dream, which was then combined with a sort of escape fantasy when things felt really difficult in the world. I am currently writing an alternate history where women are the dominant sex, and that was born by a fascination with women in history (such as Anne Boleyn and Elizabeth Woodville) and how hurt they were by the patriarchy. It definitely all comes from somewhere deeply personal.

Are you a plotter or do you go with the flow, as a pantser?
I would say I am a bit of both. I usually start writing the first few chapters, and then stop to draw up a plan. The plan changes several times when I’m writing though, and I feel the story comes to me more organically when I get into the flow! I think it’s helpful to have a rough outline, but also good to lose yourself in the narrative and see where it takes you.

Can you give novice writers some tips (do’s/don’ts)?
I think the most useful thing I learnt as a writer was ‘show don’t tell’. So, instead of ‘he was angry’, maybe he ‘balled his fists’, or ‘clenched his jaw’. I think anyone who wants to write should just write! If you write one page a day, by the end of the year you will have a book. There’s a lot that goes into the technical side of cleaning up a novel when it’s finished, but if your story has heart and imagination, you will create something that will captivate and enthral your readers!

What are your future plans as an author?
I am currently just finishing up the alternate history novel I mentioned earlier, which I then intend to try and get a deal on. I would love to return to the ‘Space Academy’ series and write some more instalments. I already have a rough draft of a sequel, and I would love to share the rest of the character’s story if there’s enough people who want to read more!

Last, but not least : Can you give my readers one teaser from your book, which is featured here on my blog, please?
When Will, Lois, Emily and Finley encounter a terrifying creature at their school, they are brought together in a way they never imagined. They begin to investigate the truth, leading them back to Earth where uncover some frightening secrets. Will discovers he is more connected to the mystery than he could have bargained for and is left questioning his identity after a series of revelations rock the foundations of all he has ever known.

Isn’t that a great reason to pick up this book and to find out more?!
Thanks once again for this lovely interview, Hannah Hopkins.

The Magic of Wor(l)ds

 

 

 

P.S. Are you an author (or publisher) who also wants a FREE interview like this? You can always contact me via e-mail!